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Full text of "Compute! Gazette Issue 43"

A Buyer's Guide To Modems 



COMPUTEFs 



$3.00 

January 1987 @ 

Issue 43, Vol. 5, No. 1 

02220 S4.25 Canada 




FOR COMMODORE PERSONAL COMPUTER USERS 



The Fundamentals of Downloading 

A Step-by-step guide to accessing software via telecomputing 



Connect ^Em 

The classic pencil-and- 
paper game takes on a 
new twist in this computer 
version. For the 128, 64, 
Plus/4, and 1 6. 




Keyword i,^^}>^ 
Construction Set 

WRITE instead of PRINT? 
NUEVO for NEW? Easily 
change any BASIC 
keywords with this clever 
p-'ogram for the 64. 

1 



'7148602220" 6 




One-Touch 
Function Keys 

Disk directories, LIST, 
SAVE, or LOAD with a 
single keypress. 
For the 64. 



Also In This Issue: 

Medium-Resolution 
Graphics For The 64 

Icon Changer For GEOS 

CP/M: Surviving With 40 
Columns 

Software Reviews 

And More 







'b^-' m' 



Decipede 

Stay calm and shoot fast to defend yourself from a 
frantic insect invasion in this arcade-style action game 
for the Commodore 64. 



(Not Bad for a 37-Ton Tank.) 



to 100 MPH In 4 Seconds 

In Antarcticei, no one can hear you scream . . . 

You're caught in a blizzard with your air supply running low. Snowbllnd, you hear a scream ouerhead and 

it isn't the wind An alien Tighter plane has spotted you and he's got you locked-on. If he's got buddies, 
you could end up Spam®-in-a-can. Uh-oh, your radar picks up incoming /ig/ifers, tanks, missiles and rockets. 

Get ready for the fight of your life . . . 




ARCTICFOX 



HAVE YOU GOT WHAT IT TAKES? 



TJte gtikied missiic's on-boafd camera. 

PitlfXt for n^onrraLvssnci! . . . if gou't-e 

got the time for sighlseei/ig. 



CODE NAME: Arctlcfox 

MISSIOM: Infiltrate alien stronghold Search out and 
destroy alien mafn fortress. Terminate 
alien troops with extreme prejudice. 
PRIMARY ASSAULT VEHICLE: Arctlcfox. 37-ton 

advanced all-terrain vehicle. 
ARMAMENT: 150mm cannon 

2 mine dispensers 
Tunnel scries missile- launcher 
Line- of- sight guided missiles 
MAX SPEED: 100 mph 
CREW: 1 

MISSION SUCCESS PROBABILITY: Slim 
MISSION SURVIVAL PROBABiUTY: Worse 



T 




"•vifflS 



j» 



The Main Fortress, //ycn/'n? 

good enough to fb\d it. are you bud 

enough to destroy it? 



-'^ff^"'' 



M# 





7 



ELECTRONIC ARTS" 

How to order, l/tsil your retslier. If you iK unable to find the product ji( yaur Ixal retailer, you can call e0O.245JI52S for direct WSW or MMtomrd orders 

(In CA caJI BOO-Sezl 112). The direct price is SJ9.S5 for the /'<pple and Amiga uersions and ^32.95 for the CB4/I2a uersion. 

SPAM Li J rrgatcred trademark of Ceo. A Hamel & Co. To buy by malL send check or money order to Electronic Arts DiKCl Sates, P.O. Box 7530, San Mateo. CA 94403. 

AM SS for shipping and handling li 7 Canadian}. There Is i3 (4 i(jy money-back guarantee on difecl orders. For a coniplclc product catalog, 

scndSOC and a stamped self- addressed enuelope to: ElcelmntArls Catalog. IB20 Csleway Drive, San Mateo, California, 9«M. 



CompuServe. 

You DONT Have 1) Know How It Works 

Tb Appreciate All It Can Do. 



CompuServe is a computer inlonnation 
service. You subscribe to il. Iti relurn. you bave 
access to an incredible amount o( inlonnation, 
entertainment, communications and services. 
Here are a few of tlie hundreds of amazing 
things you can do. 

COMMUNICATE 

CB Simulator features 72 channels for 
"talkiiiff Willi other subscribers. National 
BuUelin Boards let 
you post messages 
where thou- 
sands will 




see 

Ihem. ^^i 

Friends, 

relatives and business associates can stay in 

touch Ibrougti EasyPlex™ Electronic Mail, 

More 111 an 100 CompuServe Forums 
welcome [jarticipation in discussions on all 
sorts of topics. Software Forums help witli 
online solutions to software problems. 
Hardware Support Forums calcr lo spe- 
cific: cominiters. There's e'en free software, 
and online editions of computer periodicals. 

HAVE FUN 

Play all sorts of sports and enter- ^ >^_ 
tainment trivia games, brain-teasing ^ ^ 
educational games and the only i. y 

online TV-style game show with # 
real pri zes. r, f or the ul li m a le ^ ., 

in excitement, !^et into an inlerac- ^ ^ 
live space adventure. 



'8 



SHOP • 0- 

THE ELEaRONIC IrtALL™ • ; 

takes youonacoast- to-coa st ^ 

shopping spree of nationally * 

known merchants, wjlhoiit ever , ^ 

leaving home. ^ 



• 



'v.. 



SAVE ON TRIPS 

With CompuSerw's travel services jbu can 
scan flight availabilities, find airfare bargains 
and even booltyour own flights online. Plus, 
there are complete listings of over 23,000 
hotels worldwide. 

BE INFORMED 

CompuServe puts all of the latest news at 
>'our fingertips, including the AP news wire, 
llie Washington /V«/, tlie St. Louis Posl- 
Dispatch. specialized business and trade 
publications and more. Our executive news 
service will electronically find, "clip" and file 
news lor >«u . . . to read whenever )tiu'd like. 

INVEST WISELY 
Gel complete stalistics on 
over 10,000 NYSE, AM KX and 
OTC securities. Historic 
trading statistics on over 
90,000 stocks, bonds, 
funds, issues and 
options. Five years of 
daily commodity quotes. 
Uixiates on hundreds ol 
companies worldwide. Stan- 
dard A Poor's, Value Line. Over a 
do?.en investment lools. 

So much for so little. 

All you pay is a low, one-time cost for a 
Subscription Kil (suggested retail price 
S:^y .9 5). Usage rates lor st a n - y<TTx 
da rd on I i ne t ime (wh e n - V"^ s 





^\ 



CompuServe is most 
active) are just IOC a 
minute. In most major 
metropolitan areas wu 
can go online with a local 
phone call. Plus, you'll receive 
a $25.00 latroductory Usage 
Credit with the purchase ol your 
CompuServe Subscription Kit, 





So easy the whole family 
can go online. 

Comi)uSer\'e is "menu-driven," so begin- 
ners can simply read the menus (lists ol 
options) Ihat appear on •■ 
their screens, then t>i)e in 
their selections. It >-ou e\er 
get lost or confused, ty[)e H 
tor help. Iiememi)Gr, you 
can always ask ques- 
tions online through 
our feedback ser- 
vice or phone our 
Customer Service 
Department. 

Before you 
can access CompuServe, yt)u need 
a computer, a modem (to connect >'our com- 
puter lo >X)ur phone) and, in some cases, some 
simple communications software. Now >'ou're 
ready to order. For your low, one-lime sub- 
scription iee, you'll receive: 

• a complete, easy-to-understand, 170-page 
spiral-bound Users Guide 

• your exclusive preliuiinfiry pass^word 

• a subscription lo CompuSerw's monthly 
magazine. Online Today 

• a $25.00 usage credit! 

To buy a CompuServe Subscription Kil, see 
yotir nearest computer dealer. To receive our 
informative brochure or to order direct, write 
or call 800-848-8199 (in Ohio, f)lt-457-08()2), 

CompuServe. You don't have to know how 
it works lo appreciate all it can do— for you. 



CompuServe^ 

inlormallon Sorvpcos. RO. Box 20212 

5000 Ailinglon Centre Blvd^ Columbus, Ohio 43220 

An HSR Btodi Cofnpnny 

EnyPloi and ELECTROKIC MALL an iriOpnud^t cf 



The next revolution in 
It's called Virtuoso® 

So unique, so sophisticated, 
It's up for a patent. 



\\ 



•' » 




We promised mullimcdia software 
with more capabilities thati any exist- 
ing personal software on the market. 
The experts said it couldn't be done. 
But we delivered the VIRTUOSO® 
Software System.'-'" A single disk that 
combines fuil-color rotational graph- 
ics plus text, music, and telecommuni- 
cations. We call it the the touch of 
genius and it 'sup for a patent. 

You can draw and move up to 16 im- 
ages independently of each other at 
different speeds anywhere on the 
screen, Scale them larger or smaller. 
And then turn them all full circle — 
yes, 360dej«recs! In real time. 

Those Ullages can be graphics you 
draw with a keyboard, joystick, touch 
pad, or mouse. Or text — letters, 
words, sentences — that you treat like 
graphics. Talk about desktop publish- 
ing! How about a newsletter that sings 
and dances? 

You can put music in mntinn. 
Through the graphics you draw and 
the movements you choose, you simul- 
taneously produce and control music. 

The same actions and movements 
that change and maneuver your graph- 
ics also control the music so you can 
change the melody, make it louder or 
softer, speed it up or slow it down. 

You say you can't draw or compose 
music? Few of us can. That's why we 



vmruoso" isi 

registered trademark of 
VirtusoiTtcs Corporatloa 
Commodore" 64^*" and 
Commodore 128TM are 
registeied trademarts 
of Commodora 
Electronics Limited. 
Atari" 800XL™ and 130XE™ 
ara tfademarltB of the 
Atari'' Corporation. 



computer power is here. 

Multimedia Software: 



buik in a library of graphics and 

music. You can "draw" almost any 
scene easily, quickly, and expertly by 
calling up standard components or 
"building blocks." Create a baseball 
team, a band, a spaceship, a futuristic 
car, a dream city skyline — anything. 

Then, choose from a variety of 
music themes— classical, pop, rock- 




Using the built-in lltirary o( graphics as "build- 
ing blocks," you can oxpertly create any story, 
like this adventure In the tropics. Make the 
plane dive, spin iho propellers, pull up and 
away. Bend the palms. Simultaneously make 
the red car speed toward you, growing 
larger as it zooms into the night. With j.f 

your original music or a track from ,;V* 

the library of music. ^' 

j0'j 



and use them as is or make changes to 
suit your ear. No worry; VIRTUOSO 
Software has iiours of memory. 

Synchronize your graphics and 
music easily to produce yow show, 
your personal music video. Play it, 
store it, change it, print it frame by 
frame. And phone it. 

Imagine sending your creation — 
graphics, music, text— to friends across 
the country by modem. Or picture 
yourseli" receiving someone else's show 
and interacting with it. 

Clearly, this is a total breakthrough 
technology that deserves a patent . 

Best of all, VIRTUOSO Software is 
easy to use. Instructions and choices 
are offered by menu screens, using sim- 
ple action words and icons. 

The price? You can have it all for a 
song. Only $4'>.95 per disk. With full 
Virtusonics support and updates. 

We're advertising directly to you so 
you can enjoy VIRTUOSO Software 
right now, the moment it's available. 
At the same price you '11 pay wherever 
and whenever you buy it— a price that 
gives you value and satisfaction. Be- 
cause we're here for the long run. 

Free Bonus: 
CompuServe S15 Starter Set 

Order now and your Virtuoso Software 
will include a FREE CompuServe 
INTRO-PAK'\' a starter set that gives 
you instant access to CompuServe plus 
$I5credit. Whalabuy! 



4 Ways to Order 

Use the coupon, phone us, shop the 
CompuServe Electronic Mall, or ask 
your dealer. But don't wait. Get (he 
touch of genius now. What a gift ! 

2 12-3 16-6744 in New York City 
1-800-528-6060 
askforext. 105 




ft^ K**' 



To: Virtusonics CorpnraUon 

123 Duke Ellinglon. Boulevard, NY, NY 10025 

Yes, send me__ Virtuoso Software disks at 

$49.95 each for a toial of 



CALL 

TOLL-FREE 

TO ORDER NOW! 

1 ■800-528-6060 

ASK FOR EXTENSION 105 



New York State rosidetil.'i add sales tax. 
U Check D VISA □ MasterCharee 

Card* 



.Exp, Dale_ 



Ship lo: (Name). 
Address 



City/State/Zip 
Signature 



For: D Atari, or □ Commodore 




One for all. 



or. I M.-i-("K UOThOII I'H I .'I'l 




':«!m«MMHM^^ 



RWMMimMMMniMM 



Affordable, Compatible, and Full Color Capablel 



Besides being the one printer for 
all the PC's pictured above, the 
OKIMATE' 20 is also the one for all 
your printing needs. 

Want to spruce up your 
homework with colorful charts 
and graphs? The OKIMATE 20 is 
for you. 

Need crisp "Near Letter Quality" 
printing for business correspondence? 



The OKIMATE 20 is for you. 

Maybe you want expanded or 
fine prim, italics, underlining, 
superscripts, or subscripts? You 
guessed it. the OKIMATE 20 is for 
you, too. 

In fact, no matter what you have 
in your PC. you can put it on paper 
with the OKIMATE 20. 

With this versatile printer you 



also get such high-end features as 
built-in type fonts, a 24 -element 
printhcad and the ability to make 
transparencies for overheads. 

All at a very low-end price: $268* 
complete with "Plug 'n Print'" 
personality module. 

For the name of the OKIMATE 20 
retailer nearest you. simply call 
1-800- OKI DATA. 

'Sui^fit'iled ft?lail fifice De^iler pnce nuy vary 




KffsmcriKl TcatJfm.Kk* OKIDAlA.Ol Arawico Inc Mamuf ilnnisiv OliAm«k.ii Inc PLUG N PEIMT Oil AmMit.,i Ini UKlMAlt Okl tlctWt liliiiKJtv Compiny, Ul) Crmimudiitf ifldCummtxIare M. 
Coiiiil.™lfm? F.l«lr!in>«. LUl A(l|>le Apple Computn, Ira IBM (ntwrialioiul Busin«s MashinesCorp ■ AWn Awn Ira ttmifMi,irkv Arm^ t\>riimii|Jii»--ApiilSH .Inr KTlt . ll11w1istl!iridniiliiiii-». MdiiiiMS CiHp 



m^^TW' 



©(Q)ffi]l^©ffi]ftS 



January 1987 Vol. 5, No. 1 



features 



Getting Started with Telecommunications Services Kathy Yakal 

A Buyer's Guide to Modems Caroline Hanlon 

The Fundamentals of Downloading Todd Heimarck 



reviews 



Battlefront Neil Randall 

Hacker II: The Doomsday Papers Scott Thomas 
Gettysburg: The Turning Point George Miller . . 
Superscript 12B Ervin Bobo 



22 


* 


30 


* 


34 


* 


64 


64 


66 


64 


68 


64 


70 


128 



games 



Decipede James Knesel< 

Connect 'Em Francis Chambers 



50 64 

52 128/64/+4/16 



education/home applications 



Keyword Construction Set Rick Bauer 

Computing for Families: 

Beyond the Desktop — New Metaphors for Computers 



Fred D'ignazio 



56 64 
99 * 



programming 



Hints & Tips: Screen Tricks 

Mastering 128 Sound and Music, Part 4 D. C. Holmes 

Machine Language for Beginners: A Simple Magic Richard Mansfield 

Video Setup, Part 2 Jim Butterfieid 

One-Touch Function Keys Keith Ashcraft 

Icon Changer for GEOS Douglas S. Curtis 

Medium-Resolution Graphics for the 64 Louis Giglio 

Data-Aid Henry Pesch 

CP/M: Surviving with 40 Columns Ken Arbuckle 

Power BASIC: Information Please Rick Nash 

BASIC for Beginners: All About Loops Larry Cotton 



54 * 

58 128 

74 64 

78 128 

82 64 

84 64 

88 64 

92 64 

97 128 

101 64 

102 128/64/-H4/16/V 



departments 



Robert C. Lock . . . 
Editors and Readers 



The Editor's Notes 
Gazette Feedback 

User Group Update 

Bug-Swatter: Modifications and Corrections 
Horizons: User Groups Todd Heimarck , , . 



10 * 

16 * 

62 * 

81 * 

100 * 



program listings 

How to Type In COMPUTEt's Gazette Programs 
The Automatic Proofreader 

MLX 

Advertiser's Index 



104 * 

106 128/64/-f4/16/V 

107 64 
144 * 



= General, V-VIC-20, 64=Commodore 64, -l-4=PJus/4, IS^Commodore 16, 128= Commodore 128 



COSirL'TFf'^ GAZt:TT}:\^ jjubli^htd monthly bv COKPUTil fubltfation^. Int-.. SZ."? 7[h Avenue. \(nv ^oik. X^ IDOl'^ USA. Phone: [111) ^65.3360. Editorial offices are locittdHjt 324 
West Wendoi-et AvcnUf, Greensboro, \'C 27408. Diinn->.tit Subwriptioni: 12 iwues, $24 POSTMASTER: Sorlil address changes to COAf/'L'TAVi CAZfTTf. P.O. Bos 10937, Dm 
Moinff, [A 5(1340. Sitond cljss application pendinj! ,lt Creeniboro, NC 27403 jnd jdrfillonal mailing offices. Kntiri' tontents copyright >ii\9Sii l>v COMPUTtl Pubficarians, Itic, All 
rights reserved, ISSN 07370716, 

COfffUTB Publlcjlions, Inc. is part of ABC Consumer Magaiines, Inc, Ont o( Ihe ABC Publishing Compinioi: ABC Publljhing, i*re»ldent, Robert C Burton; 1330 Avenue o( thu 
AmeriCils: Ne>\' York. Ni'w Yurk lOOW. 



COMPUTE! Publications Jnc.^ 

One or Ths^ ABC Hubhsfimq Cornpari'ffS ^^^^ 



Publisher James A. Casella 
Founder/ Editor in Chief Robert C. Lock 
Senior Editor Richard Mansfield 
Managing Editor Kathleen Martinek 
Executive Editor Selby Bateman 
Editor Lance Elko 
Assistant Editor Rhe» Anderson 
Production Director Tony Roberts 

Editors 

Tom R. Hal/hill, Editor, COMPUTERS Atari ST Disk & 

Magazine; Stephen Levy, Editor, COMPUTE! Books Division; 

Ottis R. Cowper, Technical Editor 

Assistant Editors 

Gregg Keizer, Ann Davies (Books); George Miller, Dale 

McBane, (Technical); Philip L Nelson (COMPUTE! Magazine); 

Todd Heimarck, {COMPUTEI's Atari ST Disk & Magazine); 

Kathy Yakal, Assistant Features Editor; Tammie Taylor, Karen 

Uhlendorf, Copy Editors; Caroline Hanlon, Editorial Assistant; 

Mark Tuttle, Submissions Reviewer 

Editorial Programmers 

Patrick Farrish (Supervisor), Tim Victor, Tim Midkiff 

Programming Assistants 

David Florance, David Hensiey, Troy Tucker 

Administrative Staff 

Executive Assistant, Debi Nash; Julia Fleming, Iris Brooks, 

Mary Hunt, Sybil Agee 



Production 

Irma Swain, Production Manager; Janice Fary, Art & Design 

Director; Lee Noel, Assistant Editor, Art & Design; De Potter, 

Mechanical Art Supervisor; Terry Cash, Carole Dun ton. 

Typesetting 

Artists 

Dabney Ketrow, Robin Case (Publications); Harry Blair, 

Illustrator 

Associate Editors 

Jim Butterfield (Toronto), Fred DTgnazio (Alabama) 



415-348-8222 
415-348-8222 
212-887-8476 
919-275-9809 



Sales Offices, Jules E. Thompson, Inc. 




1290 Howard Avenue 






Suite 303 






Buriingame, CA 94010 






Midwest 


312-726-6047 


M>A 


Texas 


713-731-2605 


Pacific Northwest 


415-348-8222 




Northern CA 


415-348-8222 




Southern CA 


213-378-8361 


ffp^^ 


Arizona 


213-378-8361 


\r^ 


New Mexico 


213-378-8361 


An^l Boriin 


Colorado 


303-595-9299 


<i1 CLrcalftlDDj 



COMPUTEI Publications, inc., publishes 

COiym/TB COMPUTEI Book! COMPUm't OASTTE 

COMPUm't QAZETTi Dltk Apple Applleatlons 
COMPVTil's Atari ST Disk & Magazlna 
Editorial Office: 
324 West Wendover Ave., Suite 200, Greensboro, NC 27408 

Corporate Offices: 

825 7th Avenue, New York, NY 10019 
Customer Service: 

P.O. Box 5038, F.D.R. Station, New York, NY 10150 

Telephone: (In NY) 212-887-8525; 
(In U.S.) Toll free 1-800-346-6767 
Office Hours: 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM Monday-Friday 

Subscription Orders 

COMPUTEI's GAZETTE 

P.O. Box 10957, Des Molnes, lA 50340 

TOLL FREE 
Subscription Order Line 

1-800-247-5470 

tn lA 1-800-S32>1272 

COMPUTEI'S GAZETTE 
Subscription Rates 

(12 Issue Vesr)! LIS (one year) $24. Canada, Mexico and Foreign 
Surface Mail $30. Foreign Air Mail S6S. 



CustcHner Service 

Diane Longo, Customer Service Manager; Orchid Tamayo, 
Dealer Sales Supervisor; Cassandra Greene, Customer Service 
Supervisor 

Receptionist, Anita Armfield 

Warehouse Manager, John Williams 

President James A. Casella 

Vice President, Advertising Richard J. Marino 

Vice President, Finance & Planning Christopher M. S a vine 

Advertising Sales 

Richard J. Marino, Vice President, Advertising Sales; Peter 
Johnsmeyer, Director of Advertising Sales; Bernard J. Theobald, 
Jr., Associate Advertising Director; Kathleen Hanlon, 
Production Coordinator 
Sales Representatives 
Jerry Thompson 
Lucille Dennis 
Tom Link 
Harry Blair 

Address all advertising materials to; 

Kathleen Hanlon, COMPUTEI's GAZETTE 

324 West Wendover Ave., Suite 200, Greensboro, NC 27408 

Sales Offices 

Northeast 212-315-1665 

Mid-Atlantic 212-315-1665 

Southeast 212-275-9809 



The COMPUTEI's GAZETTE Subscriber list is made available to carefully 
screened organizations with a product or service which may be of 
interest to our readers. If you prefer not to receive such mailings, 
please send an exact copy of your subscription label to; comi>ute['s 
GAZETTtr, P.O. Box 10958,' Des Moines, iA 30950. Include a note in- 
dicating your preference to receive only y our subscription, 

Authors of manuscripts warrant that all materials submitted to 
coMrUTEii GAZETTE are original materials with full ownership rights 
resident in said authors. By submitting articles to comI'UTEVs 
GAZETTE, authors acknowledge that such materials, upon accep- 
tance for publication, become the exclusive property of COMPUTEI 
Publications, Inc. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced 
in any form without written permission from the publisher. Entire 
contents copyright © 1987 COMPUTEI Publications, Inc. Rights to 
programs developed and submitted by authors are explained in our 
author contract. Unsolicited materials" not accepted for publication 
will be returned if author provides a self- ad dressed, stamped en- 
velope. Where programs are included in an article submission, a 
tape or disk must accompany the submission. Printed listings are 
optional, but helpful. Articles should be furnished as typed copy 
(upper and lowercase, please) with double spacing. Each article 
page should bear the title of the article, date, and name of the 
author. COMPUTEI Publications, Inc., assumes no liability for errors 
in articles or advertisements, Opinions expressed by authors are 
not necessarily those of COMPUTEI Publications, Inc. COMPUTE! 
Publications assumes no responsibility for damages, delays, or fail- 
ure of shipment in connection with authors' offer to make tape or 
disk copies of programs published herein. 

PET, CBM, VIC- 20, Commodore 64, Plus/4, 16, and 128 are trade- 
marks of Commodore Business Machines, Inc., and/or Com- 
modore Electronics Limited. Other than as an independent supplier 
of quality information and services to owners and users of Com- 
modore products, COMPUTEI Publications, Inc., is in no way asso- 
ciated with Commodore Business Machines, Inc., or any of its 
subsidiaries. 












Flight Simulator II 

Scenery Dislcs 

The Challenge of Accomprished Flight 

With a realism comparable to (and in some ways even surpassing) 
$100,000 aircraft flight simutacors. Flight Simulator II includes foil 
flight instrumentation and avionics, and provides a full-color out-ihe- 
window view. Instruments are arranged in the format standard to 
modern aircraft. All the radios needed for IFR (light arc included. 
Front, rear, left, right, and diagonal views let you look in any direction. 
Program features are clearly documented in a 96-page Pilot's Operat- 
ing Handbook. 

For training in proper flight techniques. Flight Simulator II includes 
another 96-page instruction manual, compiled by two professional 
flight instructors with over 8,000 hours flight time and 1 2,000 hours 
of aviation teaching experience. You'll learn correct FAA- 
recommended flight procedures, from basic aircraft control through 
instrument approaches. To reward your accomplishments, the 
manual even includes a section on aerobacic maneuvers. 

The Realism and Beauty of Flight 

Go sight-seeing over detailed, realistic United States v__ 

scenery. High-speed graphic drivers provide an '*™™ 

animated out-the-window view in either day. dusk, or 
night fiying modes. . a. 



Flight Simulator II features over 80 airports in four 
different scenery areas: New York, Chicago, Seattle, 
and Los Angeles. Six additional Scenery Disks covering 
the entire Western half of the United States are now 
available in IBM and C64/ 1 28 disk formats. \ 



pi',.. ;.*I\ti' 'i ;--1e/ -y.A' 



Appte and Atari versions will be released soon. Each disk covers a 
geographical region of the country in detail, and is very reasonably 
priced. 

The Pure Fun of "World War f Ace" 

When you think you're ready, you can test your flying skills with the 
"World War I Ace" aerial battle game. This game sends you on a 
bombing run over heavily -defended enemy territory. Six enemy 
fighters will attempt to engage you in combat as soon as war is I 
declared. Your aircraft can carry five bombs, and your machine guns 
are loaded with 100 rounds of ammunition. 

See Your Dealer. Flight Simulator II is available on disk for the 
Apple II, Atari XL/XE, and Commodore 64/128 computers for 
$49,95. Scenery Disks for the C64 and IBM PC (Jet or Microsoft 
Flight Simulator) are $19,95 each. A compiete Western U.S. Scenery 
six-disk set is also available for $99.95. For additional product or 
ordering information, call (800) 637-4983- [~~ 

ftppIC II ill trliUmirk oF A(jplc Compute^. \K 1 

Atjf, XL ind XE jrc tradcmarkt of Atari Corp Z 

Commwioft it mi IIS irt s^JdiTirn o( Coimodorir Eleciromci Ll< 

IBM PC n S rs(rtltf»d trldtrrufk el H!crnlI,0'Hl autmdl Mllhiwl Ccifp 




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You. 



No matter what the sport, we have become a nation 
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as you wish— and at no extra cost, The Bodylink System 
provides instontaneous feedback on the exoct manner in 
which your muscies ore performing, enabling you to 
correct your swing or refine your pitch while still in motion. 
Bodylink allows a true two-way conversation between you 
and your body, giving you the winning edge. 

MUSCLE COORDINATION PACKAGE— 5149.95 

This pockage includes Bodylink, Standard EMG Sensor ond 
Lead Set, Heod-Band, three electrodes and two software 
cortridges containing several programs. 




Reducing Stress. 
A Healthier and 
More Productive 
You. 



fvledicai authorities now consider stress a major health nsk 
which may result in migraines, ulcers, bock pain and 
heart attacks. With Bodylink you hove within reach a 
powerful stress reduction system. Bodylink allows you to 
focus on physical signs of stress such as muscle tension 
and skin temperature. By using this feedback, Bodylink 
quickly and effectively teaches you to reduce stress for a 
healthier and happier life. 

STRESS REDUCTION PACKAGE— $239.95 

This package includes Bodylink, Bioteedbock EtVIG Sensor and 
Lead Set Head-Band, three Electrodes, Biofeedback 
Temperature Sensor, and two software cartridges containing 
severol programs. 




Getting in Shape. . . Easier. . . 
Safer. . . More Effectively 

Home exercise now becomes exciting and more effective. 
With Bodylink you can be sure you ore exercising for 
maximum benefit. While using the cardio exercise 
package, Bodylink monitors your heart rote and helps you 
determine the ideal level you need for aerobic gain. 
With the muscle development pockoge, Bodylink guides 
you to do muscle developing exercises correctly and 
effectively. Bodylink moti votes you to work harder if you 
are not reaching your forget level, or helps you slow down 
if you ore working too hard. 

CARDIO EXERCISE PACKAGE— S209.95 

This package includes Bodylink, Standard EMG Sensor and 

Lead Set, Leg-Band, Pulse Rate Sensor, ond two software 

cartridge's containing several programs. 

IVIUSCLE DEVELOPMENT PACKAGE— $169.95 

This package includes Bodylink, COMET, and two software 

cartridges containing several programs. 

BODYLINK is Q peripheral ttiat plugs Into ttie cartridge slot of ttie 
Commodore 64/128 computer. Knowledge of computers or computer 
programming Is NOT necessary to use BODYLINK. You don't even 
need a disk drive to save your date. Various sensors ate used to 
fecord Intemal signals tcom your tiody and leloy ttiem to BODYLINK. 
You simply place the sensor against the part of your body to be moni- 
tored and watch the result on your TV screen. 

CommKJOffi is a fegistered irademark of 
Ccmmorfore Eloctronies Limited. 

DEALERS, PROGf^AMMERS AND USER GROUPS 
INQUIRIES WELCOtVIE 







LOOK BETTER! 

FEEL BETTER! 

COMPETE 
BETTER! 



With the BODYLINK 
"COMET""-' (computerized 
Muscle Exerciser and 
Trainer) attachment, you 
can build and tone the 
muscle groups of your 
stomach, chest, back, 
legs, and arms. COMET is 
an electronic muscle builder 
that is connected to BODY- 
LINK and sends a mes- 
sage to your TV screen 
when ifs compressed or 
pulled. 




MAIL ORDER TO; 



BODYLOG, INC. 

34 MAPLE AVENUE 
ARMONK, N.Y, 10504 



DESCRIPTION 


UMT 


QUAN 


PRICE 


Muscle Coorfllrotlon Pockoge 


S149.95 






Muscle Development Package 


SI 69.95 






Cardio Exercise Pockage 


3209.95 






Stress Reduction Package 


$239.95 






SATISFACTION GUARAIJTEED! t„m„„^„„^ 
f you are not completely satisfied, 
^nu may return the products witPin i^lJS^f *f'°r "'''' 
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Payment must accompany Sumoiqi 








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To purctiose oddltionol sensors and software seporately. 

Call for More Information and 
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As you read this, we're preparing to 
make our annual trek to that great- 
est of trade shows, the Winter Con- 
sumer Electronics Show, held in Las 
Vegas, Nevada, in early January 
each year. At the risk of seeming un- 
grateful, we've always wondered 
why anyone would spend the latter 
portion of the first week in January 
in the middle of the Nevada desert, 
but we make the journey, year after 
year, finding very little element of 
choice in the matter. 

Imagine a group of intercon- 
nected enclosed football stadiums, 
and you can only begin to visualize 
the inside of a Consumer Electron- 
ics Show. In the course of less than 
a week, over 100,000 electronics- 
industry representatives, buyers, 
sellers, watchers, manufacturers, 
etc., will whisk through the hun- 
dreds and hundreds of exhibits, 
making buy and sell decisions that 
most of us won't see on store 
shelves for months, if ever. As we 
have those among us here who ex- 
hibit the decided traits of high-tech 
groupies, we invariably fall madly 
in need of one of those and two of 
those and,, .you get the picture. 

Imagine seeing a quite excep- 
tional digital television exhibiting 
multiple screens, incredible clarity, 
and amazing fidelity, and discover- 
ing that no mortals will be able to 
obtain one until maybe next No- 
vember. Or imagine running across 
that product that's just exactly what 
you've been looking for and discov- 
ering (three month.s later) that its re- 
ception at the Consumer Electronics 
Show earned it a place on the list of 
products that were cancelled due to 
lack of interest. The same phenome- 
non that cancels our favorite televi- 
sion shows now manages to follow 



our product choices around. These 
digressions aside, we're really there 
to follow the pendings and happen- 
ings of our own special end of the 
industry, and the occasion of the 
fifth anniversary year of the Com- 
modore 64 seems a good time to 
look back, and ahead. 

We attended our first Winter 
Consumer Electronics Show in Jan- 
uary 1980. There we introduced our 
then-new magazine, COMPUTE!. 
Commodore was an exhibitor at 
that show, with quite a large booth 
exhibiting their product main- 
stream: watches. In the very back 
comer of their booth, relegated to a 
lesser positioning so as not to inter- 
fere with the real business of the 
company, was a display of a couple 
of Commodore computers. 

We were a very timid industry 
then, and there was very little in the 
way of activity for computer watch- 
ers at that show. Off in a separate 
hall, a company called Automated 
Simulations was demonstrating 
some of its software — it's the only 
software vendor we recall seeing 
then. Automated Simulations, for 
those of you who don't recall, is 
now Epyx, The intervening years 
have brought us great looming 
booths and displays from Commo- 
dore and Atari. We've also seen 
quite a bit of coming on strong and 
going away quietly: the massive 
personal computing extravaganzas 
of Texas Instruments, and Sinclair, 
and Acorn, and Ohio Scientific, and 
many, many others. 

Now a great deal of the per- 
sonal computing show activity has 
slowed. Some have moved to COM- 
DEX, a computer-dealer/industry 
trade show that occurs in the fall. 
Some have simply opted for alter- 



native avenues to visibility. CES is a 
trendy show, in part. In the midst of 
what one perceives as a great deal 
of stability among the present gi- 
ants of the industry — the Sonys, 
the GEs, etc., one is aware of mas- 
sive consumer trends moving 
through and around the exhibit 
halls. The excitement is quite real, 
and you can't help but be aware of 
the magnitude of moment in 
watching the first compact-disk 
read-only drive talk to an Atari, or 
be fascinated by the convergence of 
various product lines into an evolu- 
tionary marriage of electronic home 
products. So each year, while we're 
warming up for this, wondering 
why anyone would go spend a 
week in the Nevada desert during 
early January, we begin to get just a 
tiny bit excited, and wonder what 
we'll see this rime. 



Robert C. Lock 
Editor in Chief 



10 COMPUTE! S Gazeffe January 1987 




T:';/T;T?=^-'/T^,''.- 



Introducing ActionSoft! 



Colonel Jack Declares War to Improve Strategy/Action Software 

Colonel Jack Rosenow, President of ActionSoft Corporation, is out to turn 
the simulation software industry upside down: 



"IMost current simulations are little more tfian games," says the Colonel. 
"They're a far cry from what can be done with modern stale-of-the-art 
graphics technology. They have limited strategic depth and a limited sense 
of realism. That's why ActionSoft Corporation was created. We're going to 
redefine the state of the art in simulation software. 



"My own area of expertise is military helicopters - their flight characteristics, 
and their deployment on the battlefield. We've assembled a collection of 
experts in other fields (combat strategists, fighter pilots, submarine IS 
commanders) to help us develop the most realistic strategy/action simula- 
tions ever seen. 

"ActionSoft puts you at the center of the action. We take you from the depths 
of the Pacific ocean to the infinite frontiers of space. And with the incredible 
^ graphics/animation technology provided by SubLOGIC, our products 
draw you into the simulation like never before. Up to now this type of realism 
has been available only on the most expensive military simulators. We're 
making it available to everyone, jg 

"Our first product is Up Periscope!, a WWII fleet class submarine simulator 
for Commodore 64/1 28 and Apple II computers. Up Periscope! is available 
for the suggested retail price of S29.95. 

"Next up is ThunderChopper, a high-performance scout'rescue/attack 
helicopter simulator. ThunderChopper is also available for the C64/128and 
Apple II computers for $29.95." 



Colonel Jack Rosenow, USAF 



(Ret) 






i 




i 


m 


i^< 


' '? 



Captain John Patten's years of 
US Navy experience provide the 
realism and submarine combat 
strategy of Up Periscope! 



Colonel Jack Declares War on Inflated Software Prices 



"My motto has always been 'Better Quality at a Better Price'. ActionSoft 
simulations are generations ahead in strategy, action, and technology. And 
at $29.95, they're also priced less than the competition. 

"Why pay more for a second-rate simulation when you can have the best for 
less? ActionSoft simulation software sets the new price/performance J.. 
standard against which all other simulations must now be judged. But don't 
just take my word for it. Try ActionSoft - you'll be convinced." 



Acmmi^Soft - 

-GENERATIONS AHE«) IN STDATEGV ACTION SOFTWARE- 

122-4 S-BACE ST.URBANA , IL 61801 

(217)3671024 



Colonel Jack's 9000-plus hours 
of flight time are put to good use 
in the development of Thunder- 
Chopper! 



i 




■^ ^WWWW l MWW Wiw 



"'^'m^. 



' n'.tv'.wtfivuuiunnmwwivAcwn^uBTmMi 



Don't buy another submarine simulation (like Silent Service or G^|Q) assuming that 
comes close to Up Periscope! We think you'll find that the superior sir^l^Qic play action 
and 3D animated graphics of this simulation put it generations ahead of the pack! 



strategy 

You command a WWII fleet class submarina. 
Patrol the Atlantic and Pacilic thealresof war . 
Take your ordecs from COMSUBPAC 
(Commander Submarine Force Pacilic), or 
go hunting on your own. 

Captain John Patten's years of US Navy 
service provide the submarine combat 
strategy missing from other sub simulations. 
Successful enemy engagements are 
conducted in tour separate phases: 



1 . Contact (Determine direction of target 

motion) 

2. Approach (Close to within effective 

weapons range) 

3. Attack (Obtain optimum firing position 

& avoid detection) 

4. Withdraw (Avoid enemy destroyers & 

aircraft) 

Relive eight different historical situations and 
compare youf strategies with those o( real 
submarine commanders. When you master 
the daytime periscope-depth attack, move on 



to Ihe dangerous arid sktll-domanding night 
surface patrol. 

Up Periscope I includes extensive realistic 
equipment: surface and attack radars, 
variable-power periscope, torpedo data 
computer, and much more. Armament 
supplies include everything from a selection 
of old reliable Mark lOs to advanced 
wakeless (but unproven) Mark 18 torpedoes 
that can be tired from both fore and aft 
torpedo tubes. 




HE, 



l^lEIEJi'ZjlilJ 



i.TiwtmL •">*' 



Graphics and Animation 

Allied and enemy ships are depleted In truly 
unprecedented 3D detail, courtesy of 
SubLOGIC graphics and animation 
technology. Potential targets include enemy 
freighters, tankers, troop ships, destroyers, 
and battleships, plus various friendly forces. A 
complete instrument panel and split-screen 
views let you scan all vital information at a 
glance during the heat of battle. 

All major land masses and islands (and even 
a tew minor ones) are properly located. Use 
detailed Pacific and Atlantic charts to plot 
your course and navigate right to the action. 
But be careful not to gel rammed or depth- 
charged by enemy ships. And try to avoid the 
embarrassment of sinking one of your own 
Allied ships or running aground on an 
unchaned Pacific atoll, 

For true submarine action and realism, 
nothing else compares with Up Periscopel 




eriscope. 



Simulation animation and 3D 

Igraphic technologies licensed from SubLOGIC 




n 



pHmiflt » »m n <tt n. nmwwm* *v 



"-"^ — *'''***i^ 










Ltpr iguoaninai 



See Vour Dealer... 

Of writ8 or call us fof more Informalion. Up 
Periscope! is available on disk tor the 
Comoiodore 64/1 28 and Apple II computers 
(or a suggested retail price of S29.95, For 
direct orders please specify which computer 
wersion you want. Include S2.00 (or shipping 
and specify UPS or first class mail delivery. 
Visa, MasterCard, American Express, and 
Diners Club cards accepted. 



Captain John Patten, USN (Ret) 



- $29.95 - 

Better Engineering at a Better 
Price 



' 1966 AcllonSott Corporation 

3D Graphics and spacial effects courtasy 

SubLOGIC Corp Electronic Boat Diwtsion 

Commodore 64 and Commodore 128 are 
trademarks o1 Commodore Electronics, Ltd. 
Apple II is a tracfemark of Apple Compuier, Inc. 



MflON SoM - 

-GeNEHATIONS AHEAO IN STRATEGV ACTION SOnWARE" 



122-4 S. RACE ST. URBANA . IL 61801 
(217) 367-1024 



-^»ij^^^ 




^m^: 




Ctimb into the pilot's seat of a tiigh- 
performancescoul'rescue/ligtit-attack 
helicopter! This chopper for the 1990s and 
beyond, based on the Hughes 530MG 
Defender, provides the enhanced power and 
controllability not found in today's helicopters 
- or helicopter simulations, And with over 
9000 flight hours to his credit, Colonel Jack 
Rosenow has the experience to provide all 
the helicopter action and strategy you've 
been looking for. 




ThunderChopper's combination of power 
plus control lets you land on helipads or 
rooftops with case. Gain enough experience 
and you'll be ready to test your skills In a 
variety of realistic rescue or combat 
scenarios. Or relive pre-programmed 
historical situations to see how your 
strategies and abilities compare to those of 
real chopper pilots. In attack mode, you can 
skim right above the If eetops in 'nape-of-lhe- 
earth' flight and make full use of your 
chopper's advanced flight controls and 
avionics. 



Graphics and Animation 

High-speed 3D graphics, courtesy of 
SubLOGlC, offer superb oul-the-windshieW 
views in both day and night flight modes. A 
complete instrument panel and split-screen 
view allows you to scan all vital information 
at a glance while performing combat and 
rescue operations. 



ThunderChopper carries all the standard 
flight instrumentsaswell as advanced 
instrumentation (Fonward-Looking 
Infra Red, C02 laser radar, zoom television, 
and ECM) patterned after the equipment 
now being tested in the US Army's LHX 
helicopter-of-the- future' program. Armament 
includes TOW and Stinger missiles, a 
Hughes Chain Gun, and Zuni rockets - 
ThunderChopper's 750hp jet turbine and 
precise controls provide the power and 
maneuverability to use Iherrt all effectively. 

From simple landing practice to the most 
complicated exploration, rescue, or combat 
mission, ThunderChopper is tfie ultimate in 
helicopter action and realism. No other 
heticopler simulation even comes close. 




ThunderCh 




ies licensed from SubLOGIC 



h^^i^^K-ij 




See Your Deafer . . . 

Or wrile or call tis for more information, 
ThunderChopper is available on disit for Ihe 
CommoiJorB 64/1 23 and Apple II Computers 
lor a suggested retail price ol $29.95. For 
direct orders please specify wHicti computer 
version you want. Include $2.00 for sfiippintj 
and specify UPS or first class mail delivery. 
Visa, MasterCard. American Express, and 
Diners Club cards accepted. 



Colonel Jack Rosenow, USAF (Ret) 



- $29.95 - 
Better Engineering at a Better 



1986 Action Soft Corporalion 
3D Graphics and spacial eHects Courtesy 
SubLOGIC Corp. Skunk Works 

Commodore 64 and Commodore 128 are 
Irademarks ol ComrTiotJoro Eleclronics, Lid 
Apple H is a trademark ol Apple Computer. Inc. 



ACTIONSoft 

OrNl RAtrONS AHI At) IN SlHAtt (WACtKJN Slir \WMl\ 

122-4 S HACE ST.UHBANA . II 61fl01 



f?aft»r?ts8p*s?; 




Editors and Readers 



Do you have a question or a problem? 
Have you discovered somethitig that 
could helfr other Cotnmodore users? 
We imint to hear from you. Write to 
Gazette Feedback, COMPUTEl's GA- 
ZETTE, P.O. Box 5406, Greensboro, 
NC 27403. We regret that due to the 
volume of mail received, we cannot re- 
spond individually to programming 
questions. 



Magnets, Peripherals, And 
Smeared Ink 

We've had our two 64s (one for us and 
one for the kids) for almost three years, 
and use them daily. Kocently we were 
told the disk drive must be kept on the 
right side of the computer as there is a 
maj;net in the left side that would erase 
disks placed in the drive. Is there any 
truth to this? 

Would you also please tell us the 
correct order for turning on peripher- 
als? We have had several discussions 
with friends and agreed that you would 
have the last word. 

Also, what would be the cause and 
correction of the faint black lines run- 
ning across the paper (as if the ink were 
smearing) when using certain programs 
such as PrtHf Shop or Newsroom! We've 
adjusted the paper thickness lever and 
changed ribbons, but the problem 
persists. 

Jan VVcis 

W/ji7e If'.! true thai strong magnetic fields 
can destroy information recorded on disks, 
you needn't be concerned about which 
side of the computer the disk drive resides 
on. There's no significant source of mag- 
netism inside a Commodore 64. hi a quick 
glance around the office, we noticed that 
many people place their disk drive to the 
right of the 64. but that's probably because 
it's easier for right-handed people to use a 
disk drive if it's on the right. Those who 
have a disk drive on tlie left have experi- 
enced no problems. 

The "which order to turn on peri- 
pherals" question has caused quite a bit of 
discussion in the past few years. Here's 
the final word: It doesn't matter whether 
you turn on the computer, printer, or disk 
drive first. Some Commodore owners 
swear that turning on the printer first, 
then the disk drive, makes everything 
work more smoothly Otiiers argue that 

16 COMPUrers Gazette January 1987 



the disk drive should be turned on first. 
Still others say the computer should be 
first. If you feel that a specific power- on 
sequence works best for you, then that's 
the right one for your equipment. 

The black lines in your printouts are 
caused by overlapping lines. Printers are 
most often used to print letters and other 
characters, so they're set to put spaces be- 
tween lines by feeding the paper fonoard a 
little between lines. Within programs like 
Print Shop and Newsroom, the printouts 
are high-resolution images. Ideally, each 
hi-res line would print just below the line 
above. But this isn't always possible, so 
printer manufacturers have a choice: 
Either put a smidgen of white space be- 
tiveen lines or overlap the lines a hit. 
Overlapping lines gives the picture a 
more "solid" look, so it's preferred. 



Thc64C 

I'm planning to sell my regular 64 to 
buy the new Commodore 64C. Is it 
worth it, or should I keep my regular 
one? 

Scott Cummins 

The new computer differs from the old 
only cosmetically; internally the 64C is 
exactly the same as the older 64. The 64C 
does come with new softtvare^the GEOS 
operating system and software for the 
Quantumlink telecomputing service, but 
you can buy this software separately and 
run it on your regular 64. You may prefer 
the enhanced packaging of the 64C; or you 
may prefer to purchase the software and 
"upgrade" the computer yourself 



OUT OF DATA 

When 1 put the cursor on the line that 
says "READY." and press RETURN, 
the computer prints an OUT OF DATA 
error message. Is READY a command? 
Rehan Ahmed 

READY isn't a command, but READ is. 
READ takes information from DATA 
statements for use within a program. 
When you press RETURN over READY, 
you're telling the computer to read data 
into the variable Y. if there are no DATA 
statements in the program in memory, 
there's nothing to read and that's why you 
see the OUT OF DATA error. 

To see how tiiis works, type NEW; 
then enter a line such as 10 DATA 500. 



Press RUN /STOP-RESTORE (to get the 
READY prompt). Cursor up to READY, 
press RETURN, and then type PRINT Y. 
The READ has put the number 500 into 
the variable V, and PRINT Y prints out 
the number. 



The Mystery Of The Two 
Missing Bytes 

When the 64 is turned on, it says 389 1 1 
bytes free. But if I type PRINT FRE(O) -H 
2tl6 in immediate mode, it prints the 
number 38909. Now I don't care about 
the two bytes, but is that normal or 
should it be 38911? 

Stephen ]. Sommer 

On power-up, the 64 tests the beginning 
and end of free memory and sid'tracts to 
find out luw much memory is available. 
There are 38911 bytes free for use by 
BASIC. 

A BASIC program line always ends 
with a zero, and the last line in a program 
contains three zeros— one for the end of 
the line, plus two more zeros that indicate 
the end of the program. When you turn on 
your 64, there's no BASIC program in 
memory and the memory test finds 38911 
bytes free. But the initialization of BASIC, 
which comes later in the power-on se- 
quence, places two zeros at the start of the 
BASIC program text area (at 2049 and 
2050), just in case you try to LIST or RUN 
with no program entered. 

So, even though there's tw program, 
two bytes are used. When you use the PRE 
function to print the amount of free mem- 
ory, you see 38909 instead of 38911. 

CP/M Listings 

All of your programs are written for 
BASIC or MLX-format machine lan- 
guage. Is there any possibility you'll 
print programs for the CP/M mode of 
the 128? 

Hubert Lin 

The Comynodore 64 and 128 have a built- 
in operating system and a built-in BASIC 
language. Readers can type in BASIC pro- 
grams as is, with no other software or 
hardware (although a disk drive is neces- 
sary if you want to save the program). 

CP/M is an operating system which 
can run various languages such us BASIC, 
C. Turbo Pascal, and so on. But 128 own- 
ers don't gel a language with the CP/M 



m 



m 



GET UP TO 200 FUN-HLLED 




when you subsaibe now to COMPUTETs Gazette 




Subscribe to COMPUTErs Gazette today 

through this special introductory money-sav(ng,>^^j>^^ 

offer, and you'll be getting a lot more than just- --^^^^ 

another computer magazine. That's because 

each issue of COMPUTEI's Gazette comes 

complete with up to 20 all-new, action-packed 

programs. 

Subscribe now and you can depend on a 
steady supply of high quality, fun-filled 
programs for your Commodore computer — 
programs like Disk Editor, Mini-Filer, Arcade 
Baseball, Budget Planner, Sound Designer, 
SpeedScript. and hundreds of other educa- 
tional, home finance and game programs the 
entire family can use all year long. 

The superb programs you'll find in each 
issue are worth much, much more than the 
low subscription price. ■• 

And there's more to COMPUTE! 's Gazette 
than just exciting new programs. Month after 
month, the superb articles in COMPUTE! 's Ga- 
zette deliver the latest inside word on every- 
thing from languages to interfaces... from 
programming to disk drives. 

Whether you're a novice or an expeti-''^^ 
enced user, COMPUTEI's Gazette is the 
magazine for you. So subschbe today. Return 
the enclosed card or call 1-800-247-5470 (in 




Iowa, 1-800-532-1272). 
Do it now. 



'^M. 




ACT NOW 
ANDSAQI 



^S^^ 



Computers ; 
Aod MIDI „ 



V*nw« 



^ 



//■ 



ttiparlynth 



■sm^ 



COMJ^ini! Publications, Inc.® 

One of ttie ABC Publishing Companies ^^^r 



H attached order card is missing, write: COMPUTEI's Gazette RO. Box 10955. Des Moines, lA 50950 



disk; fJi[*v have to bu^ their own. Prices for 
CP/M languages range from $50 to $200 
or more. 

All oivners of the 128 have CP/M, 
but onl}/ a smali percentage own a given 
language. A type-in program for CP/M 
mode would appeal ontii to a small group 
of 128 owners who happened to own a 
particular language. We do, however, 
publish an ides for 128 owners who use 
CP/M. For example, see page 97 of this 
issue. 



Secret Codes 

I'vL> been trying to write a program that 
would both encode and decode a mes- 
sage. The code works by taking the first 
two letters of a word, checking the 
number or the enclosed grid, and writ- 
ing down that number. For example, 
"THIS IS MY CODE" would turn into 
348-365 365 505 113-149, because the 
number at column T, row H, is 348, the 
number for 1 and S is 365, and so on. 
My question is, how do you break 
a word down two letters at n time and 
then turn it into a number? If you have 
any ideas, I'd appreciate them, 

Robb Foldhege 

The MIDS function, which extracts a 
substring from a larger string, would 
serve your purposes. It's followed by pa- 
rentheses containitig a string and two 



numbers, separated by commas. The first 
number is the starling position wilhin the 
larger string. The second is hozv many 
characters you wish to extract. 

For example, AS = "SECRETLY": 
PRINT MiD$(AS,5,2) would start at the 
fifth letter, take fit'o characters, and print 
ET. If the second number is one, you can 
look at characters one at a time. 

Another useful function is LEW, 
which returns the length of a string. 
PRINT LENC'THIS IS A TEST") would 
print the number 14. The following pro- 
gram asks you to input a word and then 
prints out the characters one by one, using 
LEN ami MIDS: 

10 PRINT "INPUT A WORD (OR END)" 
20 INPUT W$: IF W$ - "END" THEN 

STOP 
30 A = LEN(WS) 

40 FOR J = 1 TO A: XS =^ MIDS(W$,J,1) 
50 PRINT "LETTER #";];"1S ";X$ 
60 NEXT: GOTO 10 

Now that you can pull out individual 
letters, you need a way to convert iheni to 
numbers. The ASC function takes a letter 
as input and returns the ASCII value. The 
ASCII numbers 65-90 represent the let- 
ters A'Z. PRINT ASCC'C"), for example, 
should return a 67. If you subtract 64, 
you'll end up with a number from 1-26, 
assuming the string contains letters but no 
numbers, spaces, or punctuation marks. 

Given two numbers that represent 
characters (2 and 5 for the letters B and E, 



for example), you could encode the mes- 
sage with a two-dimensional array. With- 
in the sample grid you sent, the 
intersection of B and E contains the num- 
ber 55, so you would have to create an ar- 
ray with the DIM statement— DIM 
T(26,26) — and then assign a unicjue num- 
ber to each slot. T(2,5) tcould hold a 55, 
T19,19) a 365, and so on. Since there are 
676 combinations (26 times 26), you 
should either put the numbers in DATA 
statements and then READ them into the 
array or xerite the numbers to a disk file 
and then INPUTS them into memory. To 
decode the numbers into letters, use a one- 
dimensional string array (DIM F$(676)), 
each element of which contains a two- 
letter siring. 



Avoiding The Save-With- 
Rcplacc Bug 

I have read that it is wise to avoid save- 
with-roplnco. My problem is commer- 
cial software that uses save-with- 
replace. 1 have already lost one file, and 
I'm afraid it will happen again. Can you 
give advice on how to use such software? 
Ornulf Nyberg 

One solution is to use a different filename 
with each save and then delete the old 
files manually from BASIC. Unfortunate- 
ly, some software uses the name that you 
loaded the file with to save it back. If your 



Infbcom introduces four newgam 



Infocom,"' the ci'azy people 
who brought you "Zork"'*' and 
"The Hitchhikei-'s Guide to the 
Galaxy" ™ has a habit of coming 
up with games that add a new 
dimension to uiteractive fiction. 
And the best keeps getting bet- 
ter. Case in point: "Leather God 
dessesofPhobos."™ Ithiisa 
sci^atch n' sniff ciU'd and a 3-d 
comic book to excite all youi' 
senses. Once youi* interest is 



piqued, youTl embai'k on a rowdy 
romp through the soku* system. 
This hilaiious spoof of 19J^0's pulp 
science fiction has 3 "naughtiness 
levels," for the pioide to the lewd. 
"Leather Goddesses" is sui'e to 
amuse membei's of either sex. 

One's really warped. 

Then there's "TtTnity."'" It 
answer the question of whether 
a game can be both light-heaited 




and profound. You journey 
thi'ough a time waip into a mis- 
chievous lantasy world where all 
atomic e.xplosiojis ai'e mysteri- 
ously connected. 'Trinity" takes 
you back to the dawTi of the 
atomic age and puts the com'se 
of histoiy in your hands. 

One's a real circus. 

It has been said that the 
cii'cus is the only really mysteri- 
ous thing left in ci\Tlization. 
One thing's for sui'e, there 
is plenty of mysteiy in 
"Ballyhoo."™*While tr^iiigto 
locate the cii'ciLs owners iSd- 
napiKd daughter, you ai-e 
somei'saulted into athi-ee- 
lingvTOrld of deception and 
Clime. To solve the crime 



Get $245 worth of coupons riii-:!-; ai yinir lelailer today. 



software lets you specify the drive num- 
ber, your files will be safe. For example, 
when the program asks for the filename, 
type O.filename itistead of just filename. 
If none of these options is available, turn 
ifourdisk drive off and then on before sav- 
ing a file. This is inconvenieni, but it will 
prevent the problems caused occasionally 
by savc-with-replace. 

Deleting A Record From A 
Relative File 

Commodore-indexed relative files fas- 
cinate me. Unfortunately, there appears 
to be relatively little known about how 
to delete a record from an indexed file. 
The articles you've published about rel- 
ative files didn't address this question, 
I'm sure there are other programmers 
who would like to know more about 
the topic. 

Larry E. Rich 

Herd's a brief overvieio of Commodore's 
various file implementations. 

Imagine a small business that has 
four customers: Young, Abel, Norton, and 
Delaney. To save those names to a sequen- 
tial file, a program has to open the file for 
writing, write the four names, and then 
close the file. The names are stored in the 
order in tohich thei/'re written, so if Young 
were the first name in the file, it zoould be 
the first one to appear when you opened 
the file for reading. 



A potential problem derives from the 
sequential nature of such files. If the busi- 
ness grows to the point where there are 
5000 customers, it will take a long time to 
find, say, the 4182nd name. You'd have to 
read sequentially through 4181 records 
before you reached the one you wanted, a 
very sloio process. You could give each 
customer a separate sequential file, but 
Commodore disks allow a maximum of 
only 144 files in the directory. 

Another limitation occurs when you 
need to sort the file. To alphabetize, you 
coidd read the four names into memory, 
alphabetize them, scratch the old file, and 
write a neiv file. That's fine for small 
amounts of data, but when there are sev- 
eral thousand records, time becomes a 
factor. 

Relative files to the rescue. If you 
know where a certain record is, you can 
read it directly from a relative file without 
having to search through the intervening 
records. To find the name at position 
3284, you'd set the pointer to 3284 and 
read the name (or other data) in the record. 

To alphabetize a relative file, you 
could read all the records into memory, 
sort them, and write them ail back out. But 
that would be just as slow as rewriting a 
sequential file. A faster way to handle the 
information is to use a separate index file. 
(Such indices are usually stored as ordi- 
nary sequential files.) 

If the files have been written in the 



order (1) Young, (2) Abel, (3) Norton, and 
(4) Delaney, the index file would contain 
the numbers 2, 4, 3, 1, 0, because Abel is 
record 2, but should be first in the alpha- 
betical list. Delaney (record 4) is next on 
the sorted list, and so on. The is used to 
mark the end of the list. Instead of a 0, you 
could also set anotlier variable to keep 
track of hoie many records there are. 

If a new record is added, it goes in the 
next available position in the relative file. 
Let's say you add record (5) Micliaets. The 
7ieiv index file would contain the numbers 
2, 4, 5, 3, 1, and 0. The number 5 ^los been 
inserted in the third spot on the list. Note 
that you don't have to resort the entire 
list; all you need do is find out where the 
new record belongs. 

Noiv let's say Delaney 's name—re- 
cord 4~needs to be removed from the list. 
The first tlwig you do is change the index 
file to 2, 5, 3, i, 0. If the record number 
isn't on the list, it has liccji deleted. You 
might also want to add the number 4 to a 
list of available records. The next time you 
add a new customer, don't put the name in 
record 6; put it in record 4. 

The Dangers Of Static 

After upgrading from a 64 to a 128 and 
after using it for over a year, a problem 
has developed. The fire button on port 
2 does not work anymore. There is 
nothing wrong with the joystick; it 



es. One really smells. 




Sivry package includes an integral set of props 
io excite your semes mid enhame the game. 

and save yoiu- hide fi'om a per- 
mmient spot in the tesk show, 
you'll need to sti-etch yom- 
puzzle-sohing sidlls to the limit. 

One*s really haunting. 

Wrapping up this new quaiiet 
is a classic gothic mysteiy set in 
a haiutted ciistle on the mist- 
shrouded seacoast of Cornwall. 
In"Moonmist""' you'll explore 
the darkest reaches of Tresyllian 



Castle and get involved mth iui 
eccentiic cast of chiu'actei's, 
including Biitish nobility, whOe 
tr-jdiig to siive your best fiiend 
fc- from a vengeful ghost. "Moon- 
mist" offei"s foiu" distinctly differ- 
ent sets of clues, problems, 
solutions and hidden tr-easm'es, 
So you'll die to re]}lay it ag-ain 
and again. 

All four are easy to get. 

Simply tbliow youi- nose to 
your local softwiu-e store today. 

inFocoii\ 

t''qrniQrfiii:'unmtiiui.oil l-,H(W-2ii2-(i.'Sti!<, x. 17C. 
Or write tu ii> ;it li") ( iimliridtrclVk Drive, 
Cambridge, M A (lany, 

S Infonm, Irx. Zarb is I rexutemi Inddsuttiiiit Bally- 
hoo. TriEiii J-. I.iijtlwr eiMfurt uf Ptntiu >iiii HenurttM 
iit (radeEmrk^ &f Mixunt. I nc. "Hiv Hilriibflurf'iGQidt to 
tiK tiihif ill Lndiaivli of UouglM Adimu. 




works fine on port 1, There seems to be 
no problem with the connections inside 
the computer. 

I would be grateful if you could let 
me know what the problem is and how 
to fix it myself, since there is not a Com- 
modore dealer in my country. 

Yousef E. Ebrahim 

It's likely ihat one of your Complex luier- 
facc Adapter (CIA) chips has failed. Tlie 
probable cause is static electricity. The 
power sivitch is very near the joystick 
ports, so, for example, if you walk across a 
carpet (building up a static charge) ami 
reach to turn on the computer, yourfiuf^er 
may spark against llic joystick port and 
send an unhealthy voltage directly to the 
CIA chip. 

The symptoms may include a joystick 
port thai doesn't work correctly, as you've 
experienced, or even a totally nonfunc- 
tional keyboard. Often you'll find that a 
number of keys on the keyboard leill not 
loork correctly. If you encounter any of 
these symptons, you're in good company; 
our experience indicates Ihat this is one of 
the most common hardware problems for 
the Commodore 64 and 128. 

The solution is to replace the faulty 
CIA chip, which is either ijuite simple or 
nearly impossible, depending on the ver- 
sion of your computer. The CIA to be re- 
placed is the one nearest the keyboard 
connector. In Commodore 64s this is in 
the upper-left corner of tiie circuit board; 
in I28s it's in the lower right comer. The 
chip has the numerical designation 6526. 
If the chip is in a socket, make sure the 
machine is unplugged from the electrical 
outlet and just pull out the old one and in- 
sert a iifU' one, taking care that the you 
dan't bend any pins and that the new chip 
is oriented in the ssme direction as the old 
one. On some Commodore 64s, the chip 
may be soldered directly onto the circuit 
board rather than being in a socket. In this 
case, we recommend not trying to replace 
tlie chip. Unless you have special equip- 
ment, it's extremely difficult to remove a 
large soldered chip without damaging the 
circuit board. In this case, you'll need to 
contact a Commodore dealer or repair 
cotter about getting a replacement circuit 
board. 

Check the advertisements in GA- 
ZETTE for companies thai sell replace- 
ment chips. 

Killing SID With Kindness? 

After about one year's intensive use, 
the SID (Sound Interface Device) chip 
in my Commodore 64 has fallen com- 
pletely silent. Can this bo caused by 
misusing the chip? For instance, can 
you damage the chip by POKEing it too 
frequently? 

Teuvo Laitinen 

The SID chip is desis^fd to be POKEd; 

such activity is considered normal use and 

20 COMPUTERS Gazelle January 1987 



will not damage it at all. In general, noth- 
ing any program does will ever damage 
any of a computer's internal hardware. 
Like all other electronic components, SID 
chips occasionally fail. The only cure is to 
replace the chip. The ayiswer above about 
replacing C!A chips also applies to SID 
chips^replacin^ the chip will be either 
simple or impossible, depending on 
wheliteror not the one in your computer is 
socketed. The S/D chip, which has the nv- 
merical designation 6581, is located near 
the center of the circuit board in both the 
64 and 128. 



Appending ML Programs 

How is it that there are some BASIC 
programs that are only three or four 
lines long and yet they take 30 seconds 
or more to load? They must be loading a 
machine language program as well. But 
there's no LOAD command (or this in 
the BASIC program, and after you run 
it, it doesn't access the disk. 

Somehow the program is automat- 
ically loading the ML, because the three 
or four lines couldn't be so many blocks 
long on disk. How would I write this 
type of loader? 

Chris Miller 

Speed Script is a good example of a tna- 
chine language program that you load and 
run as if it loere a BASIC program. There's 
no need to type ihe SYS command because 
it's built into ihe program. If you list it, 
you'll see a single line that says 10 SYS 
2061 and no more. And yet, i't takes up 
20-30 blocks on the disk.' 

If you were to load Speed Script into 
an ML monitor and look at locations 
S0801-S080C, the beginning of BASIC, 
you'd see the follotoing sequence of bytes; 

OB 08 OA 00 9E 32 30 36 ,3? 00 00 00 

The first two bytes are the line link (a 
pointer to Ihe next'BASIC line, at S080B, 
which happens to be the second-to-thc- 
last zero). The nexl tivo (OA 00) are the line 
nundier (10) in loiv-byte/higii-byte for- 
mat. The token for SYS is $9E, followed by 
the numbers 2-0-6-1 (as ASCII charac- 
ters). The three zeros mark the end of a 
BASIC program. 

Location 2061 is Ihe next byte follow- 
ing the zeros, so when you run the pro- 
gram, it executes a SYS to the next 
available address. The programs you've 
noticed with three or four lines use the 
same principle. 

SpeedScript was written with a ma- 
chine language assembler which wrote the 
necessary bytes to disk, followed by the 
ML program. To do this yourself send the 
appropriate characters with the .BYTE 
pseudo-op (if it's available In your assem- 
bler). If you're using an ML monitor, store 
the bytes into memory and then save the 
memory from SOSOI to the end of the ML 
program. Another way to do this would be 



to POKE to locations 45-46 (the end of 
BASIC on the 64) and then use the SAVE 
command. 



An Undocumented 128 Command 

I was experimenting with different 
functions on the 128 and typed RRE- 
GISTER A,B,C,D. The computer ac- 
cepted it, so 1 typed PRINT A,B,C,D. 
Four values appeared and 1 wrote them 
down. Later that day, I entered the ma- 
chine language monitor and was sur- 
prised to notice that the values in the 
accumulator, X register, Y register, and 
status register (AC, XR, YR, and SR) 
were the same as the values 1 had writ- 
ten down! I believe this is a previously 
undocumented function, since it 
doesn't appear in the System Guide. 

Scott K. Silverman 

The RREC command in BASIC 7.0 is in- 
deed undocumented, at least 'within Com- 
modore's manuals. It's not mentioned in 
either the System Guide or the Program- 
mer's Reference Guide. However, RREG 
is covered ni COMPUTE !'s 128 Pro- 
grammer's Guide. 

RREG IS followed by one or more 
variable nantes (A, B, C, D are suitable). It 
puts Ihe values of the accumulator, andX, 
Y, and processor status (P) registers into 
the variables. You can thus pass values 
from an ML program back to a BASIC pro- 
gram via RREG. You can also send values 
ihe other direction, by adding up to four 
variables or values after a SYS statement. 
SYS 3072,A1,A2,15,Z(5), for example, 
would put the value in Al into the accu- 
mulator. A2 into the X register, 35 into the 
Y register, and Z(5) into the processor sta- 
tus register. The equivalent on the 64 is 
POKEing values into locations 780-783 
before you SYS and then PEEKing loca- 
tions 780-783 after Ihe RTSfrom the ma- 
chine language subroutine. q 



COMPUTEI's Gazette is look- 
itig for utilities, games, 
applications educational pro- 
grams, and tutorial articles. If 
you've created a program that 
you think other readers might 
enjoy or find useful, send it, 
on tape or disk to: 

Submissions Reviewer 
COMPUTE! Publications 
P.O. Box 5406 
Greensboro, NC 27403 

riease enclose an SASI; if you 

wish to have the materials 

returned. 

Articles are reviewed within 

four weeks of submission. 



COMMODORE CLASSICS! 



PAPERCLIP WITH SPELLPACK 

for \\w Commtxlore 61 

"Thi'^1 Best Selling Word Processing Package." 

- BILLBOARD'S COMPUTER SOmVME CHART 
"Superb ... the most sophisticated to date. " 

- COMPUTE MAGAZINE 

"Ttu' best professional word processor available. " 

- RUN MAawiNE 

■ Fast: Insert/ Delete, Move or Copy words, 
phrases, sentences or entire blocks of text. 

■ Eas}': save up lo 52 repetitive words or phrases 
(hen enter them with just two keystrokes. 

■ Sophisticated: Global Search and Replace 
changes every occurrence of a wrong word or 
phrase. 

■ Works with the Consultant Data Base Manager 
fortheC64. 

■ Personalized form letter, mailing list and 
mailing label functions. 

■ Built-in Spetlpack with Dictionary for fast error 
checking. 

THE CONSULTANT 

for the Commodore 128/fil 
Database management made easy! 
"Combines simplicity with speed and gigantic 
records. " 
-COMMODORE MAGAZINE 

■ Built-in template.'! for the most- needed database 
functions: Inecntory. Budgets, Mailing Lists, 
Catalogs and many more. 

■ Extensive macro capability 

■ Keyed field access speed — I./ 10 second; sorting 
speed — 4 seconds per 1000 records. 

■ Slk search operators — Equal To, Greater 
Than. Less Than, Not Equal To, Match Anywhere, 
Wild Card 

■ Totally flcvibte relational reporting — insert 
any Consultant duiafile in a report. 

■ Works with PaperCtip Word Processor 

KEYS TO TYPING: 

fnrlhe Commodore 64/128 

40 words a minute in 32 easy lessons — or less! 

Learn lo type atyoar own pace! 

■ :i2 step-by step lessons to reach at least grade !0 

proficiency! 

■ Lessons based on proven instractional 
techniques used by typing teachers 

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far mi>il B*li(*r1f » IntJuJrd pmdurDi you can iU«>i hAir ihr lairii vr'nloii 
filfour pnijinftm hi' rrtumln^ thf^ orinlitAl (ll»k mvi IID.OO. v%'rllf to u» tnr 
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for I he Commodore 128 QvXj ^^ 

"An exceptional value . . one of the best software 
investments now available for the CI2S.'" 

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The */ best-selling word-processor, re-designed to 
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Paperclip text files. 

■ Integrated 38, (100-word spelling checker to give 
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■ Built-in telecommunications module to access 
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■ Works with TH E CONSULTANT for the C12H. 

■ New editing features include muttlide columns, 
reverse video scroll and chaptering, with 
maximum document size now expanded to 999 
lines. 

CALKIT 

for the Commodore 64/128 

"... the very best program of its type ...a 
powerful tool that 's not overpowering ...the 
perfect spreadsheet for the home user." 

- COMPUTER ENTERrAINERNEWSLm'KK 

■ Simplified, streamlined spreadsheet program 
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■ Formats are already set up, calculations are 
pre-programmed - all you need do is enter data. 

■ Design your own customized worksheets to 
solve specialized problems 

HOMEPAK 

for the Commodore 64/128 

", . . inexpensive, powerful, integrated software. 
^' such. llomePak is the winner of InfoWorld's 
Best Buy .Award." 

- INfOWORLO MAGAZINE 

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■ Over 20 fall-screen editing and formatting 
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system, for .limphfied electronic filing 

All three HomePak programs tvork together so it's 
easy to transfer data and perform integrated tasks. 



Getting Started With 
Telecommunications 

Services 



Kathy Yakal, Assistant Features Editor 



More and more Commodore owners are discovering the fun 
and value of compufer-to-compniter telecommunicatiaus. And 
membership in one or more of the iiatiomoide feiecomnnDtica- 
tions services is among the most popular and entertaining 
ways to telecompute. Here's a look at how to get started. 



The explosion in the consumer 
electronics industry over the last 
decade or so has caused many peo- 
ple to rethink their traditional no- 
t i o n s of entertainment and 
communication. Take video cas- 
sette recorders {VCRs), for example. 
They are now affordable household 
items that make it possible to rent, 
or actually own, copies of motion 
pictures. 

Cable television, to a lesser de- 
gree, also gives people more control 
over their entertainment choices. A 
cable system incorporating 20 or 30 
channels offers many times the 
choices available just a few years 
ago. 

Likewise, personal computers 
and modeyjis, the peripheral devices 
that enable your computer to com- 
municate with other computers 
over telephone lines, are bringing 
about similar changes in communi- 
cations. Online news and infor- 
mation networks offer a wide 
variety of services, ranging from fi- 
nancial information to public do- 
main software to online shopping 
to conversations with people 
around the world. You no longer 
have to wait until the stores are 
open to shop, or keep looking out 
the door to see if the paper has ar- 
rived, or listen to the busy signal 
after repeatedly dialing a friend's 
phone number to chat. And if you 
choose and use the service wisely, it 
won't break your budget. 
22 COMPUTE! s Gazette January 1987 



What You'll Need 

Although the setup you'll need to 
connect — or log on — to a telecom- 
munications service is relatively 
simple and inexpensive, the hard- 
ware and software required on the 
other end is not. These services are 
complex businesses, requiring hun- 
dreds of thousands of dollars worth 
of computer and telephone equip- 
ment, and large staffs of program- 
mers and customer-support 
personnel to keep the systems 
running. 

All you'll need is your Com- 
modore computer, monitor or tele- 
vision, disk drive, and modem. 
Your considerations in buying a 
modem will likely have to do with 
how much you want to spend, the 
variety of features you want, and 
your plans for future computer- 
related purchases. 

Modems capable of working 
with Commodore computers range 
from under S50 to hundreds of dol- 
lars. If you anticipate spending a lot 
of time online, you may want to in- 
vestigate the special features of- 
fered on more expensive modems. 
And if you think you'll be hanging 
onto your Commodore for a few 
years, many of the inexpensive 
Commodore-specific modems will 
suit your purposes. But if you plan 
to buy another computer in the 
near future, it might be wise to 
spend a few extra dollars now on a 



modem you'll be able to use on 
both, {For more information on 
niodems, see "A Buyer's Guide to 
Modems" on page 30.) 

Telecommunications is similar 
to other computer applications in 
that it requires special software. 
Telecommunications software, 
often called terminal software, does 
the work necessary to let your com- 
puter "talk" to another computer. 
Most modems come with such pro- 
grams of their own, but often these 
are not sophisticated enough to 
handle much more than the most 
routine operations. If you find this 
to be true after spending some time 
online, you can look into buying 
something more suitable. 

Once you have the hardware 
and software necessary, you'll need 
a way to get access to the online ser- 
vices. This is handled in one of 
three ways. Some services offer 
starter kits, packets that you can 
buy at a computer store or through 
the mail that contain instructions 
for the system as well as your own 
personal log-on information. Some 
require a phone call or a request in 
writing to receive a password — the 
code word that keeps your telecom- 
munications private. Instructions 
for using these systems are handled 
online and also through written 
documentation. In both of these 
cases, just about any terminal soft- 
ware will suffice. But at least one 
online service currently operat- 
ing — QuantumLink — uses a spe- 
cial terminal program written 
specifically for Commodore com- 
puters, and subscribers must obtain 
one of these disks. 

There's one more thing that's 
advisable to consider before 



Your Ticket 
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When was the last time you had the chance to attend 
a championship sporting event-or better yet, play in 
one? Gamestar's series of outstanding sports simu- 
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Every Gamestar simulation is as real as the 
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won't be easy. If it was, it wouldn't be 
worth it. 

For the very best in sports-the 
excitement, the challenge, even the 
championship-Gamestar is your 
ticket. 




Aiailahle for 1»M PC PCjr and 
Tiin^y 1000, CommodDre 
Amiga, :tnd ci^mp^libE? com- 
puler iy«4frins. Coming ^onn 
roFAppl«!lEHAUlriSTandcnm- 
pailbtff f;ompu(CF sysl^mt 



Avsilabk fnt Apple II. IBM PC 
PCjc aodliijd) lOOO, Commo- 
dorv 6 '1 . i 3 S r 4nd AmJga, Alaii 
ST, and compariblc compu(«r 



Aisilable (or Apple II. IBM PC. 
PQc andlindy lOQO, CouimO' 
dore ti -1 . 1 2D. a nd Amiga. Alari 
SX and compalibit: computer 
sj-alcmt. 



Available tor Apple II, IBM PC, 
PCJ r. and "Eindy 1000, Coinmo- 
dorfi € 4 , 1 2 8, and Amiga, Ala ri 
SX and compatible com putter 



Available for Comini>dore 64 
and 128 compulerfystcrtu- 



Available lor Cummodore i 
and 12s computer s^-slcm*. 



'■""""•'' '■' •■ f^''™-",^ iif Ai,il.Mijn, Int. (..jiui.uKluni tH. 1:1 f! JiiJ Aliiluj ata timli'iiuit. ulUmmalim filwnmiiiri. I.inuwl, IHM ii u irjrl..iii.irt i<l iiii.imaliiiinl IHiuti.« Miittilti.-i t:.irri.>rjtniii TjikIv 
U a tr-jUunMtk nlTitulj (j)T)«irjtl(jn Atan anj ST unj trjitonnrfa olArjnC«)i. A(hjI«m a trjrtunnirV ei AppUiCijrilpijwc ActMitiiii i« tfiBimWifnit traili'tnarii iif ftcuilmi.ti. Ijii C lUltIi Vi;tMi4un, Iiir. 



launching into telecommunica- 
tions: Where is your computer sys- 
tem physically located? Obviously, 
it needs to be near a phone. If you 
have only one phone in your home 
and would like to add an extension 
specifically for telecommunica- 
tions, think about placing it a room 
away from other family activit)'. Be- 
cause hourly online charges are 
lowest at the least active hours for 
telephone services (evenings and 
weekends), you may be spending 
some time telecommunicating 
when other occupants of your 
home are sleeping. If you live with 
a number of other people who use 
the phone a lot and your telecom- 
munications needs are extensive, 
you may even want to think about 
adding a second line. 

How To Choose 

Currently, there are about a half- 
dozen or so telecommunications 
services operating in the home mar- 
ket that attract a good many Com- 
modore owners. 

You may ultimately decide to 
subscribe to more than one online 
service, but before you invest in 
your first one, it's best to look at 
your needs and budget, as well as 
how each service can meet those 
criteria. 

First, carefully examine each 
service's fee schedules and hours of 
operation. Services available 24 
hours every day often charge much 
higher rates for weekday daytime 
use than evenings and weekends, 
since they offer features used by 
businesses during work hours. This 
tends to discourage casual users 
from logging on during those 
hours, freeing the phone lines and 
the system itself. 

Next, think about your person- 
al needs for communication and 
information. Each service offers a 
unique configuration of the 
following: 

• Social interaclioji. Most ser- 
vices offer many different opportu- 
nities for interaction with other 
users. Some have conference areas, 
where the conversation is general, 
and the agenda is set by whomever 
happens to be on at any particular 
moment. Some services set aside 
special times and areas for confer- 
ences focusing on a single topic. 
Private conversations with one oth- 

24 COMPUTEI's Gazette January 1987 



er person are usually possible, as is 
electronic mail, messages that you 
can leave for another user to pick 
up the next time he or she logs on. 
And if you get lost in the system at 
any time, there is usually a com- 
mand to signal a system o pent tor 
(sysop) that you need some individ- 
ual assistance. 

• Finaticial information. If 
you're a serious investor in the 
stock market or even just a casual 
owner of a few stocks here and 
there, you may want updates on 
what's happening on the stock ex- 
changes. Some telecommunications 
services offer easy access to current 
stock prices, usually with at least a 
15-minute delay. 

• Computer-related information. 
Many online services have their 
roots in this activity, since the im- 
petus for starting them was often to 
provide a forum for computer own- 
ers to share technical information 
and trade software. Generally, the 
most technically proficient com- 
puter users in this country are very 
active online, and many are avail- 
able for formal and informal confer- 
encing on a variety of computer- 
related topics. Most services offer 
special-interest groups (SiGs) 
where information about specific 
brands of computers is swapped. 

Commodore SIGs are general- 
ly divided into several different 
segments: conference forums, 
where users can just chat; down- 
loading areas, where individuals 
can download public domain soft- 
ware ( see "The Fundamentals of 
Downloading" on page 34); news 
and information sections, where 
the latest Commodore news, indus- 
try rumors, and product infor- 
mation can be found; electronic- 
mail areas, where users can leave 
open messages for technical help or 
private messages to other users; 
and bulletin boards (BBSs), where 
messages and other information fo- 
cus on a variety of more specialized 
issues. 

• Topical SIGs. The growing 
number of people online who want 
to communicate with other people 
on non-computer-related topics has 
led many services to open SIGs 
dealing with a variety of these top- 
ics. Just about any interest imagin- 
able can be found on different 
services, and new ones are con- 
stantly being created as needs arise. 



To make these areas as helpful as 
possible to their users, system plan- 
ners often enlist the help of experts 
in a given field to answer questions 
and facilitate conferences. 

• News ami sports. The newspa- 
per, radio, and television may still 
be the preferred way to get the lat- 
est news about current events, 
weather, and sports, but online ser- 
vices continue to improve their cov- 
erage. They can't as yet provide the 
kind of in-depth coverage a news- 
paper can in the same amount of 
time, but they have an advantage in 
that they don't have to wait for 
printing and delivery time. Their 
edge lies in fast access to breaking 
news headlines. 

• Travel senuccs. In many cases, 
a travel agent may be faster and 
cheaper for cutting through to the 
best fares and schedules, but online 
airline guides are seeing an increase 
in sophistication and popularity. 
Their greatest advantage may lie in 
emergency situations. More than one 
harried traveler has passed up the 
long lines at the ticket counter in 
the airport, hooked up a portable 
computer with a built-in modem to 
a pay phone, and made a last- 
minute change in flight 
reservations. 

• Online gaming. Playing games 
over the phone lines using comput- 
ers has gone on for many years, but 
these games have generally been 
limited to text commands that can 
be easily passed from one kind of 
computer to another. Sophisticated 
games that incorporate color, graph- 
ics, and animation require the kinds 
of standards that are found only 
when one kind of computer, like a 
Commodore, is used to play tele- 
games with another Commodore. 
Still, most services offer a wide vari- 
ety of single-player and multiplayer 
games, ranging from computer ver- 
sions of simple board games to com- 
plicated strategy games like 
CompuSer\'e's MegaWars. 

• Public liomain softzvare. This is 
one of the most popular features of 
online services and BBSs, and also 
one of their most technically diffi- 
cult functions. Thousands of public 
domain — or noncopyrighted — pro- 
grams, covering every computer 
application, are available online. 
Mastering the ins and outs of 
downloading is the trick here. 



Jet 



/ 



7 




f 



x%. 



I-I ■ < OMXOnBH 



^. ' 



i 



m 









Si, 



J'; /'/'■; 



l\V'^ 









A New Dimension In Fun 



Easy aircraft control, coupled 
with unexcelled omnidirec- 
tional visual (plus audio) 
references and ballistic 
power, provide the speed and 
aerobatic maneuverability 
that add up to pure fun. 
Engage in a wide variety of 
combat scenarios (land-based 
F-16 or carrier-based F-18), or 
fly over detailed United States 
scenery at Mach 2. 



IS 



Flight 



Simulator 



scenery Disk 



Compatible 



LDGIC 



713 Edgebrook Drive 
Champaign IL6IBZO 
t:iTU59-S482Telei 206m 

Of(lerLln«:(80O)637«>963 







,X Strap Oil your j>c-iracluiteHi.stt'ii>x)urm)iitilL:s.Accoki(.le is tiboul to laiiiK-hyi)ii to new hair raising ticij^lils iti combat 
simulation. ^ Accolade's Ace ot Aces combine's all of the cxiiilaration of (liiilit witli tin," HUt wreiichiny pressure of enemy 
confrontation. You'tl climb into tlie cockpit of (lie luavorick Mostiuito fighter bomber; pride of the Roral Air Fbrce during 
WWII, tangle with the Nazi Luftwaffe, dodge V-1 Buzz liombs, theti pierce through the clouds for a surprise bombing raid. 
Wlial does it take to bean Ace? Prom you. legendar>' Britisti [)ride and guls. From Accolade, legendar\' playability. Accolade 
has done its part. The rest is up to you, mate. ^ At ci i| Aci's TtiiTh,tllcii!^('is|.iirc.'\ci-')lai;. Available on Commodore 
64' 128. Accolade. 2081,3 Stevens Creek Boulevard,Cupertitu),Califoriiia!)5()14.i'hone '108-446^5757. ^QjQl^^W^^^ 



Linking Up And 
Cettinj; Around 

There are tufo ways of getting in 
touch with an online service. Some 
have phone numbers dedicated to 
their services in most major cides. 
However, if you live in a rural area, 
this may involve a long-distance 
phone call every time you log on. 
Other services use networks, such 
as Tymnet, Uninet, and Datapac. 
Using dedicated phone lines in ma- 
jor cides, these networks let you 
link up indirectly to the desired on- 
line service. Each service has spe- 
cialized commands that you enter 
to gain access to the system once 
you've called the network number. 
Usually, this is just a brief pattern of 
letters, digits, and punctuation 
marks. 

Once you're actually online 
with a service, getting around to the 
different areas you want to explore 
requires some knowledge of the 
system's menu structure. Most use 
a branching menu system. You enter 
at the main introductory area, move 
out to the general topic area you 
want to pursue, work your way 
down within that branching sys- 

26 COMPUWs' Gazette January J987 



tern, and then retrace your steps 
when you want to move to a differ- 
ent area. Most services also offer an 
expert modi' that skips most of the 
menus to save time and money, let- 
ting you quickly jump to where you 
want to be. 

Even infrequent users of tele- 
communications services need to 
learn a bit about a particular sys- 
tem's commiuid stnictiin', the pat- 
terns of keys that you press to move 
around. Knowing your way around 
will save time and money, and 
you'll help avoid annoying other 
users with constant queries for 
help. Also, you'll prevent an inad- 
vertent lockup, or actual bump off 
the system. I'or example, if you 
press the wrong sequence of keys, 
you may find that you're running in 
place, and no keypresses will get 
you out. You'll have to turn off your 
computer, reload your terminal 
software, log on to the system, and 
get back to where you were. That 
whole sequence can take several 
minutes, and leave an unnecessary 
bad taste in your mouth for tele- 
communications in general. Such a 
scenario can be avoided from the 
start with a little preparation. 



What's Online 
For Commodore? 

All of the major online telecommu- 
nications systems offer special 
Commodore-specific features, 
though Commodore owners may 
find many general areas of interest 
there, too. Here's a look at fees, 
subscriber information, and a brief 
overview of what's available for 
Commodore owners on several of 
the leading online services. 

American People/Link 

The Commodore Club here contin- 
ues to be one of the most popular 
areas of the service, offering con- 
versation, special forums, and pub- 
lic domain software for 
downloading. Many Commodore 
Plinkers (People Linkers) frequent 
the general interest areas as well. A 
Help system is available for begin- 
ners, as is Advanced Mode for more 
experienced users. 
American Home Network, 3215 N. 
Frontage Rd., Suite 1505, Arlington 
Heights, IL 60004; 800-524-0100 (11- 
limis residents call 312-870-5200); 
non-prime-time access rate is $4.25 
per hour at 300 baud and $4.95 an 



hour at 1200 baud; prime-time fees 
are $U.95 for 300 baud and $12.65 for 
1200 baud (Illinois residents pay 
S4. 25 at all times). 

CompuServe Information Service 

CompuServe was one of the earliest 
online gathering places for Com- 
modore owners, and many still 
congregate there. One of the main 
draws for this service lies in sheer 
numbers; close to 300,000 people 
are subscribers. A subscriber base 
of this size allows a service to offer 
a great variety of general interest 
features, though specific needs for 
Commodore owners are also readi- 
ly available. 

CompuServe, P.O. Box 20212, Colum- 
bus, OH 43220; 800-848-8199; S39.95 
regist ration fee; prime -time access is 
$12.50 an hour at 300 baud and $15 
an hour at 1200 baud, with non- 
primt'-time rates of $6 an hour at 300 
baud and $12.50 an hour at 1200 
baud. 

Delphi 

Delphi has developed a steady fol- 
lowing over its few years of exis- 
tence, many of whom arc some of 
the most familiar names in Com- 
modore computing. Flagship Com- 



modore and Starship Amiga, the 
two Commodore SIGs, offer inter- 
action and assistance to Commo- 
dore owners. 

Delphi, 3 Blackstone Ct„ Cambridge, 
MA 02139; 800'544-4005; $49.95 reg- 
istration fee; prime-lime access is 
$17.40 an hour and non-prime-timc 
access is $7.20 an Jiour. 

GEnie 

Only in its second year of opera- 
tion, this service of General Electric 
has already drawn close to 30,000 
subscribers, many of whom are 
Commodore owners. Similar in 
menu structure to CompuServe, its 
Commodore SIG offers many of the 
main features found on older, more 
established services. 
General Electric Information Ser- 
vices, 401 N. Washington St., Rock- 
ville, MD 20850; 800-638-9636, ext. 
21; $18 registration fee; prime-time 
access is $35 an hour, and n on-prime - 
time access is $5 an hour. 

QuantumLink 

Designed specifically for Commo- 
dore owners, this service requires 
special software, provided by 
QuantumLink, for access. This soft- 
ware makes color and graphics pos- 



sible, allowing easy-to-follow 
menus controlled by the functions 
keys, and interactive, animated on- 
line gaming. Commodore provides 
technical and marketing support for 
QuantumLink. 

QuantumLink Customer Service, 
8620 Westivood Center Dr., Vienna, 
VA 22180; 800-392-8200; no registra- 
tion fee; $9.95 monthly charge (no ad- 
ditional charges except for certain 
selected services at six cents a 
minute). 

The Source 

Though more business-oriented in 
the past, the Source has been adding 
to its consumer-oriented features. 
SIGs were added about a year ago, 
among them, one for Commodore. 
The Source, 1616 Anderson Rd., 
McLean, VA 22102; 800-336-3366; 
$49.95 registration fee. Billing is $10 
a month or your usage, whichever is 
greater. At 300 baud, prime-time ac- 
cess is 36 cents a minute and non- 
prime-time access is 14 cents a 
minute; at 1200 baud, prime-time rate 
is 43 cents a minute and non-prime- 
lime is 18 cents a minute. la 



/Tonijjht, the MurderCiuh will he clicckinfS into the G;ii>;oyle Hiitol.Tomon-ow. you may Iw checkingout before the continental 
breakfa.st...in a body bag./ Pc'alunngover20 dilTereiil plots. Accolades Killed Until Dead puts you in the gumshoes of the world's 
greatest detective, Hercule ! lolmes. You must tty and prevent five of the worlds most brilliant murder mystur\' writers from com- 
mitting the perfect murder. Does .steely^yed Mike Stammer have a chainsaw up his sleeve? Will blubbery Sidney Meanstreet finally 
bur>' the hatchet ... het\veen little Agatha Maypoles .shoulder blade.s? Yiu have until midnight to .solve the whodunnit, the whatdunnit 
and the wheredunnit before .someone's gone and done ill/Killed I ^titil I lead. The mystery is ]nire Aanladi-. .Available on Commodore 
64T28. Accolade. 20813 Stevens Creek Boule\'ard. Cupertino, California 95014. Telephone 40«446-5757. V r-rv^l V r\|- - 




TCP- HOME OF THE HITS 



OPEN 9am-8pm: Mon-Frl, Wam-Spm Sat EAST COAST TIME 
HOLIDAY HOURS Dec 1-23: fJI-T 9am-10pm, F 9an]Spm, S&S 10am-6pm 



GAME GALLERY 



Educational Software too! 

All Games stocked for quick ship!!! 



MISC GAMES 

HobbHt $CAU. 

Sa/BoiUll %37.3S 

Murder by Ui9 EJonn ti*M 

ACCESS 

aa $24.95 

tHaxii $ts.9i 

LMdHBowd t2«.9S 

L««dir Boanj Toum. Diwi $ie.95 
ACCOLADE 

Dam Bustsrs $Si.95 

FiflMNiflht 122,96 

HaM Ball $21.95 

LawotlhsWesI I2Z.9S 

PSI 6 trading co C2 95 

ACTIVISION 

Ataiar StS9£ 

BoriDwtd Tim* tlS.95 

Ca mp . Rrowks C« I«brt1'n | T 9 .95 
Counldown !D fthutciawn . S V 3 .95 
Fa&t Tracks SIDE CarOonfC $19.95 
Garry Kitchen's Qarnertiakr $24 95 

QEJA Bsjkeltxttl 2 911 2 S24.95 

□ hostbusters 124.65 

Gfea AmwRR t249S 

Hil*m- it 9.95 

Haeh«f II _ „_ „ ,. S!4 95 

I am tt» 64 $21.95 

lamttwlSfl $24.95 

Little Computer Peoplf $24.95 

Master Q( Lampi $t9.95 

Mrndshiaow ft 9.95 

On Court Tennis $21,95 

I'nfali II: LAst CAvsrrta $t9.95 

Space ShuWe $t9.9S 

Slai Rank Boxing $21.95 

ARTWORX 

Imematjonal HocKsy $t6.9& 

AVAI/)NH1LL 

OiHaitia ^.95 

StiM«40 $24.95 

SupertiDwi Sunday $S6.95 

Team Disk tor SS $16.95 

HltODERHUND 

Cltarrtpshp Lode Runner .. $24.95 

Kareleka $19.95 

LDdeRunner $24.95 

Must Shop $49 95 

llLLtE CHIP 

Bjiwi $?4 95 

Hmorain $24,95 

Tycoon $24.95 

COMMODORE 

ShyTrmrsI $2?.95 

DATA EAST 

Comntan<to $24.95 

Karate Champ $26.95 

Kung Fu master $£6.95 

EI±CTRONIC ARTS 

Advemure Conslr $27.95 

Antnasia ..,...,... $29.95 

Affilioo2 «7.95 

AiwFoi $24.95 

Amoduel _... $3? 95 

BanfsTale „ $32 95 

BsrrfsTalell $26.95 

Battlelrom $2995 

Crtmers at War $37.95 

E;urcf>e Ablaxe . $37.95 



Hani Hal Mack $13.95 

tj^rdS ot Conquest $24.95 

Marc la Madness S27.95 

Moeflws - $29.95 

»*BO«iPaity $2595 

Movi»M»k»f $2795 

Our* $29 95 

FWacittarllwStirt $32 95 

FVMKtnucalt $29.95 

SkyFoi K4.95 

Sottwara Golden Okliea ,., $16,95 
Ttm Laary's Mind mlrrar ,,,, $24,95 

Tfluctidown Fool&all $22.95 

Ultima I $29.95 

UltimalV $45.95 

EP^TC 

Summer Game* $26.95 

Summar Games II $26,95 

Supercede $29,95 

Templo Trltogy , $29,95 

Winter GarTt«s $27,95 

WorMGamss $29,95 

Wodd'E Cieatesi BoseDail $24 95 
Workl's Gieatesi Footeali $26,95 

Wcru Ks/ate Cite $22.95 

Call Icr price* 

on oltwf EPYX products I 

FIREBIRD 

EMe $22.95 

INFOCOM 

BaJley Hoo $29.95 

Cul TltfDatS $22.95 

Oeadtna $2595 

Enchanler $26 95 

Hitctiltiker'sGuKl* K2.95 

InWel $29.95 

Planetlall $25.95 

Sodarer C9.95 

Spelbreaket $29.95 

Suspect $29.95 

W.slibnnjet , $25.96 

Witness $2595 

ZorkI „„ $22.95 

Zotttll $26.95 

Zijrtillt $2695 

INVISICLUE BOOKS FOR 
ANY INFOCOM GAME $6.95 

LANCE ILAJNKR 

Fir.al Four BasketDaJ $29.95 

Baskstbail. the Prrt Game.. $29.95 
MICROUEA(U.rE 

Microlaague Base&all $27.96 

MicrolaaQve general rrtgr $27.95 
Microleague 1 965 teams $15.95 
MlCROi'HOSK 

Acre)el $24.95 

Cnjsaoe In Europe $27.95 

Decision In [he Oflsert $27.95 

F-15StnkeEs«le $2t.95 

Gunship $CALL 

Gnntk:t in Vietnam $CALL 

MeiKa! Aoe $2t .95 

KennsOy Approactl $24 95 

t JATO Commander $24.95 

Siten; ServKe $24.96 

SoioFiflhl $24.95 

SpiltlreAce $2t.95 

Top Secret $24.95 



MINllSCAPE 

Bank Street Muss Writer .. $27.95 

Bank Street Story tjook $27 95 

BoO-nWrastle $21.95 

CasiMC>obMi $te95 

Ha!«y Project $27.95 

Indiana Jones $22.95 

IntLltratqr $2t 95 

Ouaiie mtnus one $17.95 

Shadowtifa. $17.96 

Pertect ScoreSAT pfep .. $49.95 

T.iie Lords ot Midnight $17.95 

Call tor prices on 

other MINOSCAPE produCtll 

[WIJAJLSOFT 

Maps USA $34 95 

MapsEuropo $34 95 

WorUMaps $34 95 

SI EI IRA 

Championship Boxing $17.95 

SIMON &S1ILSTER 

Paper Arplane const $CALL 

JKLasser'sincomeTax... $39.95 

Kermil's Story Maker $19.95 

WY Times Cnjsswofd Puzzle 

Vol. tor 2 $t4.95 

Spy Hunter $3195 

Star Treii-KoPayasni alt. $2996 
Typing Tutof III $29.95 



C-fA IJATAIiASES 

Bank street Filer $34 95 

Consultant $39.9 5 

Prof* 54 $36.96 

Data Manager $19.95 

C-M INTEGRATED PKCS 

VitaslarBk $79 95 

Trio $CALL 

Momepdii $39.95 

lUU SI'Rl-jVnSHEETS 

Paport?ack Planner 64 $CALL 

Vi2aslare4 $79.95 

Praqiicaeia) or (i) $CALL 

CaMt $39.95 

Has Mulipian R9.95 

PS, Prooramtjie Sprosht . . $19.95 
Swit1cslc64w(6ideways .. $39 95 

SOways $19 95 

Cat Retul Aa« (d,c) $67.00 

C** WORD PROCESSOfte 

PeperDDCk Wnter $CALL 

Paperback Writer pictnry .. $19.95 

Bank Stmut Writer $CALL 

Bank Street Speller $34 95 

Cut t Pasle(EOA) $17,95 

Fan Masjar II $34.95 

WordPro 64 $36.95 

SpeBpro64 $32.95 

WordPro 3*«4 $14 96 

Bttt System II $CALL 

Paparip $37,95 

Paperclip wyspetipack $49,95 

Tito fCALl. 

Word Writer 64 wfspetiar ,, $34,95 



SPECTRUM HOI,OBYTK 

Galo $CALL 

SPINNAKER 

Adventure Creator $22 95 

Alptab* Zoo SIS 95 

Cosmic Ccrnbal $CAl.t 

Delta Drawirig $19 95 

Facentaker $19 95 

Hoy Diddia Diddle $16 95 

Homework Helpor iCALL 

In search of the m^a, tning $16 95 

KungFu $CAtL 

Snooper Trjops I or II $19 95 

SPRINGBO.ARD 

Eir*y Games $2695 

Easy As $29,95 

Piece of Cake Math ,, $26 95 

SIjTJ LOGIC 

Fkohl Simytitoi II $32 95 

FootbaJI $37,95 

FS II Scsnery disk $16,95 

Jel $29,95 

Night Mission PinDall $CALL 

Puro Stat Baseball $37,95 

Rtrtdom House, Spinnaker, 
and 551 products In stoct^tlt 

Call tor Prii»! 



Kid Pro Quo $32 95 

FINANCIAL & ACCT. 

Sottsyrv: Pers, Acct $32,95 

Coni, HomeAco. $46,95 

Time*or»(s General Ledger. 
AR.AP, Payroll. Invtoiyoa $40 95 

Cashboi $36,95 

Timeworlis Electr Chsckbk $19 95 
Timeworks Money Mgr . $19 95 
GKAI'lltCS 

PrtntShop $36 95 

Pnnt Snop Companion $24 95 

Graplwcs Library I. II. or ill $16 95 

Newsnwm $34 95 

CipAirl „ „ $19 95 

ClpAjlll $CALL 

CADPC $3295 

Screen Dumper 54 , , , $19,95 

MISC. HARDWARE 

Estas p^r supply tor C^64 $64 96 

Koakipad $59 95 

Koala Gibstin tight pen ,,, $49 95 
Navarone 3 Slot eipander $27 95 
UTlI.niES 

Mer>n64 $34 95 

Fast Load $24 65 

Vorpai fast toader $CAU 

Ojost Slat manasar $34 95 

Pat 64 $32 95 

Power 64 $32 95 

Toolboii64 $69,95 

CSM 1541 align $34 95 

MachS $24 95 

C Power $49 95 




ELECTRONIC ARTS" 



CLASSICS OK SALE l> I 

$14.95 EACH 



Duy 2-4 $13.95 eecJi 
Buy S or more $12,95 



Arc hen 

M,U.L.E. 

Pinball Conelr. Set 

3<>»n CItlet of aold 

Cut i. Paste 

Music Construction Sel 



Ftscing Pestr. Sst 
Heart o1 Alrtu 
Super Bolder Dash 
Mali Order Monilifs 
One on tine 
Flesim of Impossible 



To order by mall: We accept montiy ordar. 
cert.t*c decs*, personal check Allowr 2 weeka lor 
person 3l cnet^ to clear 

Shlpplr>g: $4,t)0 tor sofrMS'e and aoc assorts/ 
S 1 0, 00 ^or prirt&rs and cotormoni:ori'S3.00tor disk 
Orh;«s and o:her rrxjn^r^' Add $3 00 per box shipf}9^ 
COO, Can tor 31 h Bf shippngcharpes Adcitior'.ai 
shipping req-jiTod on APO, FPO, AK, HI, and lortign 
orders, 

Tirms: ALL PRICES REFLECT CASH 
DISCOUNT. ADD 1,eil FOR MASTERCARD 
OR VISA. Mnnutattu-'er'^ wnr'n,t1y honoioct with 
<x>py ot our nvoice ALL SALES ARE FINAL 
Dslodive <emi tspleced or repaired nt our discretion, 
Pennsylvsnd resklenu edd 6% sales tax, Pr»ces and 
terms jLSjeel to change *ihoMt notjC* 



■ Itthrough som» oversight Me dam I' .1^^ 
the lovrestpfics, wa would apprtC'j^** 
lKeopponui,tytnbeat t. If we car, ^c- 
w1 gel lite &onef:tof OLr Fsderii 

Ei press sl'rfppf,T5 on sottware orders 
ovaf $60,C<1. 
M Puretiase orders aiB accepted from 
qufll lied corporations and .nstituiions 

■ Npsaiestaxoncaersouliidaol PA 
a Ojy with contitfence. Wo honor manij. 

fac;turara warranty. 

■ Wn ncctipt Mastercard, Visa. COO and 
mail orders y™^^— ^ 1 ^^^HiHi 



INFORMATION AND 

PA ORDERS 814-234-2236 



PRINTERS— 

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siNr" 


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CALL TOLL FREE f -800-468-9044 




A Buyer's Guide To Modems 



Caroline Hanlon, Editorial Assistant 

Telecommunications is one of the fastest growing areas of computer use for 
Commodore owners. All you need to get started are your computer, a termi- 
nal program, and the right modem. Here's a look at the range of inexpen- 
sive modems currently on the market. 



Online services, bulletin 
boards, home banking, and 
a host of other telecommu- 
nicarions opportunities are current- 
ly available to Commodore owners. 
And the list is growing all the time. 
Thousands of Commodore 
computer owners have already 
added telecommunications to their 
regular computing activities. If 
you're interested in getting started, 
or simply want to buy a different 
modem from the one you have, the 
following chart should answer most 
of your questions. We've kept our 
list to those modems that cost under 
$300. But for many Commodore 
owners, a satisfactory modem can 
be purchased for less than half that 
price. The higher the price of the 
modem, the more capabilities you'll 
get. Features such as auto-answer 
and auto-originate can give you 
flexibility and speed, especially im- 
portant if you're online extensively. 
For those unfamiliar with com- 
puter telecommunications, a modem 
(MOdulator-DEModulator) is sim- 
ply a device that translates your 
computer's digital data into analog, 
or continuous-tone, transmissions 
carried by telephone lines. The 
computer at the other end of the 
telephone line uses its modem to al- 
ter the transmission back to digital 
form. 

We've listed the most impor- 
tant features you should consider. 
Here's a brief explanation of some 
of the categories: 

• Compatibility — Commo- 
dore 64- and 128-compatible mo- 
dems usually connect directly to the 
computer through the user port; 
RS-232 modems require an inter- 
face adapter since Commodore 
computers don't have a standard 
RS-232 port. 

• Baud Rate — The speed at 
which bits of data are transmitted. 
30 COMPUTEIs GaieltB January 19B7 



The bulk of the low-cost modems 
carry data at 300 baud, although an 
increasing number of modems are 
capable of faster 1200 bits per sec- 
ond speed. 

• Duplexing — Modems com- 
municate at half-duplex (one com- 
puter sending or receiving at a time) 
or full-duplex (both computers 
sending and receiving at the same 
time). Most modems are capable of 
both half and full duplexing. 

• Auto-Answer/Auto-Origi- 
nate — Can the modem automati- 
cally answer calls and receive 



information; can it automatically 
dial telephone numbers and con- 
nect your computer to other 
computers? 

• Self- Test — A modem's abili- 
ty to check itself to determine if 
everything is working, and is con- 
nected correcdy. 

• Carrier Detection Indica- 
tor — A light — usually a light- 
emitting diode (LED) — a sound, or 
a screen message that indicates that 
your computer has connected and 
disconnected with another 
computer, 

■ Terminal Software Includ- 
ed? — Many modems are sold with 
a telecommunications program in- 
cluded in the package. If not, you'll 
need to purchase your own termi- 
nal software. 



Modem Manufacturers 
And Distributors 

Listed below are the manufacturers and distributors of the modems 
included in this buyer's guide. 

Anchor Automation, Inc., 6913 Valjean Ave., Van Nuys, CA 91406, 

818-997-7758 
Commodore Business Machines, 1200 Wilson Dr., West Chester, PA 19380, 

215-431-9100 
Everett/Charles Marketing Serivces, Inc., 6101 Cherry Ave., Fontana, CA 

92335, 714-899-2521. 
Hayes Microcomputer Products, P.O. Box 105203, Atlanta, GA 30348, 

404-441-1617. 
Inmac, 130 S. Wolfe Rd., Sunnyvale, CA 94086, 408-727-1970 
Intec Corp., 21751 West Nine Mile Rd., Suite 122, Southfield, Ml 48075, 

313-352-0066 
MFJ Enterprises Inc., 921 Louisville Rd., Starkville, MS 39759, 601-323-5869 

or 800-647-1800 
Mitsuba, (US Distributor: Everett/Charles Marketing Services, Inc.), 6101 

Cherry Ave., Fontana, CA 92335, 714-899-2521 
Novation, Inc., 20409 Prarie St., Chatsworth, CA 91311, 818-996-5060 
Qubie, 507 Calle San Pablo, Camarillo, CA 93010, 805-987-9741 
TNW Corp., 950 Hotel Circle North, Suite N, San Diego, CA 92108, 

619-296-2115 
Tandata Marketing Ltd., Albert Road North, Malvern, Worcs WR14 2TL, 

England (US Agent: US Telecom Inc., 315 Greenwich Street, New York, NY 

10013, 212-608-1419) 
Touchbaae Design, 1447 South Crest Dr., Los Angeles, CA 90035, 

213-277-1208 
US Robotics, Inc., 8100 North McCormick Blvd., Sloikie, IL 60076, 

312-982-5001 or 1-800-DIAL-USR 
Universal Data Systems, 5000 Bradford Dr., Huntsville, AL 35805, 

205-721-8000 
1-800-FLOPPYS, 22255 Greenfield, Southfield, MI 48075, 800-356-7797 



We do windows. 




open a C-MORii tvuuloiv. Whipaui 
C-MORE Wriur to srurt Otat paper on 
the U.S. Consiimiion. 



Open ii ieiioiul wiiidinv. Lit' C-MOKI: 
Ctikuhtor It) divide Amatdtnems by 
years and put tke result inyaur report. 



Open anotlier mkulator tL-indoiv and 
figure the rate ofeltangefor the v.'hale 
document. 



(tet nd Li/tlte L\ileti!ittors,finishyour 
report and prim it. 



^wrTJTMnurm 







r till Item >»' 



VI 1 1 k«»4 r d njHi I 






Loarf M/i C-MORE Writer to vmte 
those requests for college catahx^. 




In ij uroihl tv!ikh-n\ hiiidyour 
C-MORE Keeper file of college ad- 
dresses. Address and print those letters! 



t I H * . T or at fi^»l i 1 ■ D n ■ 




^^. 



0/Jcti II C-MOK!: Sprciidflwci and 
figure out hum tnuny pages you get to 
read when the colleges write ytm back . 



Putoieay Ki'vpi'^aitd ct/H'n antuher 
Writer windoiv. Write Mom thatyini 
have decided to join the Marines. 




Open a C-MORE Keeper viindoiu. 
Make a file of your customers' names, 
addresses, and lawn care preferences. 



[tt three other tuindotos, load ilie Ho sic 
program you zorote to price yotir 
services. 



Put dviay Keeper and programs. Open 
a C-MORE Spreadsheet to estimate 
your summer cash fhns; and profits. 



'^4 m 



;i>l 

["M^ 



w 



t^V la Cl«if 







f 

■ t» IT 



\bu remember to check your messages. 
Zoom the family message Keeper from 
background. 




C-More, by C-More Products, 
Inc. , is an operating and applications 
system for the C-64* scries which 
lets you use up to 4 windows at once 
with up 10 8 applications in memory. 
You can move data from any window 
into the word processor, using 
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grams you write in BASIC. 

As the windows above indicate, 
you can use C-More lo write a term 
paper; carry on a letter writing 
campaign; or, develop a serious busi- 
ness proposal. The only limitation 
is your imagination. 

C-More applications include a 
word processor, a database, a 
scientific calculator, a spread- 
sheet, and comparative buyer. 



ToordcrC-Morc simply call 1-800-628-2828, cxi. 790 wiiha Visa 
or Mastercard order. Or send $49.95 in check or money order, plus 
shipping ($4,50 in the U.S. /Canada 

S6,00in U.S. funds, plus S2.00 in 

saks lax for Georgia residems) wiih 
the oni/losed coupon or facsimile. Allow 
4-6 weeks for delivery. 



Name . 



^Vidrcss . 



I Ciiy. 




Slalu . 



. Zip . 



C-MORE 



C-MoL-e I'riiducis, I'.O, Hiw 81548, ChamHee, Georgia 30348 
I 'I'M-OMofc ami (>Mahc IVtKJiii;!^ iire 'lrJcicm:irkiL "f Prism. Iiw, I 



You can manage and view data 
across four applications, alt at the 
same time - without changing disks. 
C-More consists of a diskette, a 
memory expansion cartridge, 
and an instruction booklet. 
• We also include a free disk 
copy program . So you can 
save all your data, and "back- 
up" your files immediately. 
• • C-More is not copy priTtected. 
This makes it exceptionally 
convenient to use. 
With C-More, your computer 
can grow up with you , So order 
C-More today and start doing 
more right away. Dealer inquiries 
are Vi'elcome. 



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32 COMPUTE/ 's Gazerts January 1987 



Make Any Comffate^f^ctly What You Want With McGraw-HUUs 

Contemporary 

Rrc^ramtniftg *i 
$oftwareV)esigni 






From Writing Your Own Programs to 
Modifying Existing Software, Here's the New, 
Easy, and Low Cost Way to Unlock the Secrets 
of Your Computer 

Whether yuii use computers lor liusiness, for personal 
applications, or for fun, off-the-shelf proHrams will n!?ver do 
everylhinK you want them to do for you, lliat's iKtause they 
were written by programmers to satisfy what they perceived 
as the needs of the greatest number of potential 
users— often inissini; some or many of your 
specific needs. 

That's wily McGraw-Hill's new Contemporary 
Programminf! and .Softw,ire Design Series teaches 
you how to create your own soltw.-ire . , , either 
from scratch or t>y making key jnodifications to 
existing programs. 

There is nntliing magical aljout it. You learn the 
process of building a computer program step-by- 
step with McGraw-Hill Concept Mtdules sent to you one at a 
time, once a month. Each of the ten modules in the Series takes 
you through an important step in the development of the 
structure and detailed logic of a program, including testing, 
debugging, and documentation. i 

Unique Interactive Hands-On Instruction 

liaeh nifxlule includes an easy-ti>understand guide PLUS a 
5W" floppy disk containing typical programs and interactive 
instruction that you can run on Commodore 64 and 128 computers, IBM 
PCs and f'C compatibles for hands-on experience. 

In tlic first Module, for example, when your sample program (Declining 
Interest l^ins) appears on your screen, you'll find errors on certain pro- 
gram lines. You'll also see that the program is only thrce-tjuarters completed. 

Now comes the fun pari. You'll discover 
how this program is built, and in the process 
you'll learn how to identify and correct 
error.s. And by the end of Module I , 
you'll actually have completed this 
program yourself. 

But there's more. Special graphics 
on your screen work in conjunc- 
tion with the accompanying guide 
to amplify, illustrate, and deepen 
your understanding of software 
design principles. 



Make no mistake. Almost alt books and courses on "programming" 
teach you only the final 5% of the total programming procesii— 
namely, how to code in a specific language . . . information ol little 
value if you don't know how to reach the point in the programming 
process when you are ready to code. 

With the Series, however, you'll learn to create your owti programs 
from scratch, even modif}' off-the-shelf programs. You'll learn enough 
BASIC and machine language to get you started on the remaining 
5% of the programming process. 

Build Your Own Personal Software Library 

P,,^ Tlic sample programs you work with throughout the 

Scrici are excellent learning tools. But they're more than 
that. By combining the sample programs onto one master 
disk, you'll have the start of your own personal software 
library. In addition to the programs you've written and 
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of the most popular public domain and user-supported pro- 
grams, such as data base manager, word processor, calen- 
dar generator, appointments reminder and much, 
much more. 

ISDay No-Risk Trial 

To order your first module without ri.sk, send the 
postage-paid card today. 
Examine the first module 
for 1,5 days and see how 
the Series will help you 

^^ make your computer do 

" ~~ I exactly what you want 
i il Id do! 



I 



CREATE 
YOUR m\ 
S8FTWARE 



-?C\ 









< 'i< ^l' i^ i «i«ir i H> i> i>P I H-'M'} 



r»V» ,«■ fc » ,0ils5i3sP 



■r 



If someone has beaten you to the card, write to us for order- 
ing information about the Contemporary Programming and 
Software Design Series, 



The Crucial 95%— Learn the Foundation of Computer Programming 

W-liile the Series includes interactive disks that nm on S[jcti[ic computers, everything 
you learn you can apply to any language or machine. Why is this possible? Because 
McGraw-Hill kiiow.s programming is far more than coding a program into the computer 
using a specific language. In the real world of computers, 95% olthe programming pro- 
cess is carried out using design technitiues that are in(le|)enderit of specific language or 
machine, It Ls this crucial E)5% lliat vou lliorouchlvurrderstand ,-iiid mafiterin tlicSpriw 



M 



McGraw-Hill 

Continuing Education Center 

3939 Wisconsin Avenue 
Washington, DC 20016 



The Fundamentals Of 
Downloading 



Todd Heimarck, Assistant Editor 



Thousands of public domain programs are jusi a phone call 
away — // i/oi( know hozo to use a modem to download. Al- 
though it's not especially difficult to doivnload a program, it's 
easy for newcomers to be mystified by all the nexv terminology. 
Here's a step-by-step introduction to doivnloading — what it is 
and how it works. 



Free Software? 
What's The Catch? 

Well, it's not entirely free. You need 
a modem, which may cost as little 
as $20 or as much as $200. You also 
need a terminal program, although 
most modems come with terminal 
software. Finally, you have to find a 
bulletin board system {BBS) or tele- 
communications service that has 
free software available for down- 
loading. 

Downloading would be simple 
if everyone agreed on a single pro- 
tocol (a systematic transmission 
scheme). Standards have indeed 
been set — several times — but there 
is no single standard on which you 
can depend. 

The Seven-Bit ASCII Standard 

A modem has two jobs: sending 
whistling tones over the phone 
lines and receiving whistles made 
by the other computer. When you 
communicate at 300 baud — bits per 
second — there are two different 
whistles. Think of the two sounds 
as high and low, true and false, or 



one and zero. Each tone can repre- 
sent a bit of memory. A series of 
eight tones (plus a starting and end- 
ing tone) defines a character, which 
means there are ten beeps per char- 
acter. So 300 baud translates to 
about 30 characters per second, or 
about 1800 characters per minute 
when a 300-baud modem is com- 
municating at top speed. 

The simplest terminal program 
does two things over and over. First 
it checks the keyboard to see if a 
key has been pressed. If not, it 
checks the modem to see if a char- 
acter has arrived. If not, it goes back 
to the keyboard, then back to the 
modem, and so on. When the user 
presses a key, the program sends 
the appropriate series of eight bits 
to the modem, which adds a begin- 
ning and ending tone and whistles 
the character into the phone line. 
When a character comes in, the mo- 
dem passes the eight bits to the ter- 
minal program, which displays the 
character on the screen. 

When you call a friend and 
type back and forth, this is what 
happens: You type a character, and 



the terminal program sends the ap- 
propriate bit-pattern to the modem, 
which whistles into the phone line. 
The modem at the other end re- 
ceives the sounds and sends the bits 
to the terminal program to be trans- 
lated into a character, which is then 
printed on the screen. Note that 
there's no uploading or download- 
ing going on; you and your friend 
are just typing messages back and 
forth. 

The nearly universal standard 
for sending text is ASCII, which 
was invented a few decades ago as 
a standard way of translating char- 
acters into numbers that could be 
used to communicate between 
computers and peripherals. ASCII 
includes 96 printable characters — 
numbers, punctuation marks, and 
upper- and lowercase letters. In ad- 
dition, there are 32 control codes 
that affect various functions of the 
terminal program. More about con- 
trol characters in a moment. 

if your Commodore terminal 
program communicates in ASCII, 
and there's a 99-percent chance 
that it does, you'll be able to call 
national telecommunications (run- 
ning on mainframes) as well as lo- 
cal BBSs (running on Commodores, 
Apples, IBMs, or almost any other 
computer). 

The 128 ASCII codes need 
seven bits per character, because 
with seven on/off bits there are 128 
unique combinations of I's and O's. 

COMPUTErs QaMM January 1987 35 



THESnON 
AREBUUWin 



Whether you're building an 
arj^umenl or just iKimmering 
out a memo, any project looks 
better wlien you put it together 
in Writer's Workshop. The 
supercharger that powers your 
GEOS-etjuippcd Commodore 
througli even the most wrench- 
ing assignments. 

Sharpen your skills. The 
first thing to do in the Workshop 
is plug into geo Write 2.0, which 
contains ail the brand new tools 
you need to lione any rough 
concept into a well-crafted 
document. 

You get headers. Footers. 
Subscripts and superscripts. 
You can center your text. Right 
justify Full justify. And nail 







Hr.StprcSin'lli 






down formatting problems with 
variable vertical spacing and 
adjustable margins. 

The Workshop cuts down 
on your manual labor, too. With 
one-stroke, "shortcut" keyboard 
commands. They keep your 
hands off the mouse so you can 
keep your mind on your work. 

In fact, there's a complete 
set of heavy-duty accessories 
that not only strengthen 
your writing, but reinforce its 
structure, as well. 







''"'--"VxrSUnntiiBiiiiinM'^ thill II' 













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Th* conclusion i^ nof ctrt'l'i* but HOUOtinB sCl^ltti'tC 
l4Ut4*nc* now indicitta that th« *39-b»art<}? Caster Bunnvr 
I all lovvil ft« chltdrvn H4y iOf|#*d br as r*ai aJ wr hAd 

Ihoptd. 

,0 \ . 



fz-^ 



Replace old, worn-out 
parts. You can build anything 
with Writer's Workshop. And 
repair old stuff, too. Just decide 
which parts have to come out 
and which new ones go in. 

Then hit the key and stand 
back. 

histantly, the "search and 
replace" drills through your old 




GESrCASES 
lAWORKSHOR 



/ 



THE EASTER BUNNY 
Rodent of Reality or Man-Made 
Myth? 



The conclusion is not certain, but 
mourning scientific evidence now indicates 
ttiat the cgg-ljearing Easter Bunny' we all 
loved as ciiildren may indeed be as real as 
we had hoped. 

Altliough tradition aQy reclusive, the 
bashful bunny has been sighted with 
Increasing frequency, over the past five 
ycare. As iUustraicd in rigure 6, the anntial 
number of sightings has steadily grown 
froiti a law of 1 .876 in 1982 to over 5.346 
so far this year. 

r 









*vi>*^■w•.^^»'*^*'^■"'■'^^'»'«^*?'''*'<'^^ 



"Tlie problem isn't so nriuch iJie 
bunny, as it is the eyewitnesses," adds 
Dr. Dougherty. "Many of them are 
unreliable, with nothing to show ftjr tlieir 
claims except for big baskets of chocolate 
eggs', leading us to beleieve we're not 
dealing with a rabbit as such, but perhaps 
an Easter Chicken." 

At first, the sightings were attributed to 
crackpots who saw The Easter Bunny as 
part of a religious ritual. However, since 
The Easter Bunny has been seen by adulLs 
as well as children, scicniL'^ts have 
become less skeptical. 

In fact, as Dr. Uevano points out, 
"The Easter Bunny must be taken 
seriously by everyone from school 
children to the President of the United 
States." 



iiwg\^^B ^VM ?1 VJ i V*>i^T ^-< \^iW <'tf ;VS ,N«J»tf%W JVWm ' .\M^^^< * . *'* " ^V<^'^*-*-','',^^' 



text, replacing worn-out words 
and phrases with your brand 
new ones. 

For more serious cases, hand 
the job over to tlie Workshop's 
Text Grabber. It takes text from 
several word processors— like 
Paper Clip"' ■ — and lets you over- 
haul them with new GEOS fonts, 
formats and graphics. 



A few more built-in 

features. Every project leaves 
the Workshop looking beautifully 
finished, too. Because it not 
only comes with LaserWriting 
compatibility, there's even a 

U Berkeley 
Softworks 



LaserWriter for you to print on. 

You simply upload your files 
to QuantumLink.''' Tiien they're 
printed and mailed back. 

Convenient, or what? 





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DUf«f^k1(tlKM», 



t)f course, you don't want to 
keep good-looking documents 
like this to yourself. So we built 
in geoMerge. Which customizes 
your geoWrite form letters to 
people on your mailing lists. 

So if your plans call for some 
real masterpieces, do something 
really constructive about it. Call 
your software dealer and requisi- 
tion Writer's Workshop. 

Who knows? You just might 
build a name for your self. 



To order call 1-800-443-0100 exL 234 
Writer's Workshop $49.95 

(Qilifornia rt.*sidents addf).5*!t sa!e^ tax.) 
S2-50 US/$5.5() Foreign for shipping mid 
himdlin^. Allow six wuoks for delivery. 

tr?i[1rfuiinra of Ik-ilM-k-v SufEwiTtki).. E^j^ht (u'lju1»t .i 



WRITER'S 
WORKSHOP 




Tlie brightest minds are working at Berlceley. 



SCENTISISi 




When we started our 
company on the west coast, 
people thought we were a little 
spaced out. So you can imag- 
ine their reactions when we 
announced we'd discovered 
a new universe. 

People laughed, People 
scoffed. And they really freaked 
out when we told them where 
we'd found it: 

Inside a Commodore 64. 

It's called GEOS. And it 
turns any Commodore into a 
powerful PC that holds its own 
against any computer, no matter 
what kind of fruit it was named 
after. 

GEOS: The superior 
intelligence. Of course, we 
always knew Commodores 
possessed superior brains. It just 
took GEOS to discover them. 

You see, GEOS opens your 
Commodore to a huge universe 
that can hold an infinite number of 
applications. Which means that 
GEOS can do just about anything 
the expensive PC's can do, 
including one thing they can't: 

Add even more GEOS 
applications that are being 
developed even as you read this. 

Increase your speed to 
warp factor 7. The first thing 
you notice with GEOS is how 
its diskTurbo speeds up your 
Commodore's disk loading and 
storing time. 







^ 



^ 

V 



f 



Not twice or three times as 
fast. But five to seven times 
faster than normal. Which lets 
you streak through files and 
documents at what seems like 
warp speed. 

And that saves you endless 
time. 



\ 



Every universe comes 
complete with a desk. The way 
to keep order in our universe 
is with the GEOS Desktop. It's 

just like your desk at home, only 
without the coffee stains. 

The Desktop keeps your art 
and documents filed, and comes 



W UNIVERSE 




with all the accessories you need 
to keep you organized: 

An alann clock keeps you 
punctual. A notepad keeps your 
memos. And a calculator keeps 
your accountant honest. 

How to communicate 
with a new universe. With 
geoWrite, you can rearrange your 
written words. Move blocks of 
copy Cut and paste. And even 
display your text in fonts of 
different styles and sizes, right 
on the screen. 

With geoPaint, you become 
a Michelangelo with a mouse. 




Sketching and painting with all 
kinds of colors, textures and 
patterns. 

You can invert, mirror and 
rotate images. Insert them into 
your geoWrite documents. And 
save them in your GEOS Photo 
Album for use later. 

Finding your way through 
the univeree. The most difficult 











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thing about a new universe is 
finding your way around. But 
with GEOS, you only need to 
remember two things: 

Point and click. 

When GEOS offers you 
options, you just point to your 
answers and click your mouse or 
joystick. 

You want to draw? Point 
and click, 

You want to write? Point 
and click. 

You want to fill in that obtuse 
rhomboid with an air-brushed 
geometric pattern in a lighter 
shade of pink? Point and click. 

Easy, huh? And in case you 
ever do make a mistake, GEOS 
backs you up with an "Undo" 
feature that undoes the very last 
command you entered. 



n 



Berkeley 
Softworks 



Running out of space. 

With GEOS, that's hardly likely. 
Because there's endless space in 
the universe for new applications. 

Unfortunately, there's only so 
much space in this ad. 

So zip down to your nearest 
software dealer. Tell him you want 
to explore the new universe in 
your Commodore. 



I ^«in I Irk ; Kit i mnitin! ; IBW ■ Itilte I I li^^ I nutiioi Itttti ^a 



V<M vjfi E* fJMffrd to know 1W pfodufct nut tiv.'a -f..,ifLT;BJ 

i^HiHiS™itSQ^ij •f^'nj gou a 






«. 



mm 



IT" 

JAM KB HAD 
lit OsiIUI Sllci 



And if he looks at you like 
you're some kind of alien, well, 
just tell him Berkeley Softworks 
sent you. 

The name is universally 
known. 



To order, call 1-800-443-0100 ext. 234 

GEOS is just S59.9.5 

(C.ilif()mia residents add 6.5% snlos tax.) 
$2. 50 US/$5.50 ForciKti for shippinj! ;itid 
handlinK. A)!ow six weeks for delivery. 

Coiimiodore frl and C(>4 are tradfinarks of 
Ceiinniiidure Klcctroiiics, Ltd. (iMOS, GICOS 
Desktop, KL'oPaitU. jjcoWrite, disk'tiirlH) and 
Berkeley Softworks an? trademinies of 
Berkeley Softworks. 



The brightest minds are working at Berkeley, 



Bubble, Bubble, 
toil and trouble... 

Macbeth . . . Hero or Villain? It's 
the central conflict behind one of 
classic literature's greatest plays, 
Macbeth has complex, colorful 
characters, plus rebels and kings, 
murder and treachery, justice and 
high tragedy. The makings of an 
excellent play are now an equally 
intriguing computer adventure! 




9»7SS^^ $30.00 

Diskette for Commodore 64/128 
Four separate graphic and text 
adventures cover a different part 
of the play . . . two more are 
intertwined as you help the 
v^fitches assemble their evil brew. 




Each segment has a psychological 
program in which you and 
Shakespeare delve into the minds 
of Lord and Lady Macbeth. 
Includes extensive documentation, 




AVAILABLE EVERYWHERE or 

call toll-free: 1(800)638-9292. 

Ask for Operator M 

micnocomputep gomes division 



m 



The Avalon Hill 
Game Company 



A MONARCH AVALON INC, COMPANY 
45t7 Harford Road • Ballimore, MD 31 2U 



The eighth bit is often used as a par- 
ity bit, which is a simple sort of 
checksum. If both computers are set 
for even parity, it means each char- 
acter transmitted will contain an 
even number of on bits. A capital T 
has the ASCII code 84 ($54), which 
looks like this in seven-bit binary: 
1010100. If parity is even, an addi- 
tional 1 is added at the beginning 
(11010100) to maintain an even 
number of I's. Instead of S54 (the 
ASCII code), a $D4 (ASCII with 
even parity added) represents the 
letter T. When the 11010100 comes 
over the phone line, the receiving 



plugged in and turned on? Most 
Commodore-compatible modems 
draw their power from the user port 
and don't have a separate power 
switch, so you don't usually need to 
check whether the modem is turned 
on. 

• Are you dialing correctly? If you're 
dialing by hand, there should be a 
command in your terminal program 
that takes the phone off the hook 
(alternately, some modems like the 
1650 have a Telephone/Data 
switch, which should be on T when 
you dial and D when you're con- 
nected). After you make the connec- 



When you're writing a program, a single 
typing error can mean the difference 
between a program that runs and one 
that doesn't The same is true for 
downloading. 



terminal program strips off the ex- 
tra (eighth) bit. 

Most terminal programs come 
preset to the most common trans- 
mission standards. The two you'll 
see most often are "7-bit words, 1 
stop bit, even parity" (especially on 
services like CompuServe) and "8- 
bit words, 1 stop bit, no parity" 
(common on many BBSs). 

First Try 

If vou're brand-new to telecommu- 
nications, it might help to experi- 
ment by calling a friend first. If 
anything goes wrong, you can al- 
ways pick up the phone and talk 
about what to do next. The com- 
puter you're calling doesn't neces- 
sarily have to be a Commodore; as 
long as it communicates in ASCII, 
you should be able to type to each 
other. 

If you don't make any connec- 
tion at all, you might have one of 
the following problemsi 

• Is the phone line coming into the 
plug marked line? The cable from 
the wall should riot be in the mo- 
dem jack labeled phoue. 

• If the modem has a separate power 
supply and on/off switch, is it 



tion, take the phone off the hook via 
the switch or the command. 

• If the terminal program is dialing 
for you, it will generally indicate 
when a connection has been made, 
with a message like Tenninal Mode 
or Carrier Detected. In some parts of 
the country, the local phone system 
supports only pulse dialing. A mo- 
dem that dials by generating touch 
tones won't work in these areas. (If 
your local phone system allows 
tone dialing, either tone or pulse 
will work.) 

• Some terminal programs work 
with many different types of mo- 
dems. You may have to tell the pro- 
gram what kind of modem you're 
using. If your modem is not listed, 
it's usually either 1650- or 1660- 
compatible, For 1200-baud modems, 
you may have to choose the Hayes- 
compatible (or RS-232) option. 

• You should be operating at the 
same baud rate. If your modem is 
running at 300 baud but the com- 
puter at the other end is set for 1200 
baud, you won't be able to commu- 
nicate. (Some 1200-baud modems 
will automatically switch to 300 
baud if the other modem is working 
at 300.) 



AREYOU 
SEARCHMG 



RNtnOENDS? 



d^ 




If you're finding it increasingly 
difficult to find anything at all, 
maybe it's time you found out 
about geoDex. The GEOS-com- 
patible directory that generates 
mailing lists. Prints address 
labels. And sorts out all sorts of 
things for your Commodore. 

'fry directory assistance 
With a little help from geoDex, 
you can call up a directory 
organized from any three catego- 
ries you choose. Which means 
you can list your friends by name, 
telephone number or 
almost anything else 
that can be assigned 
its own three- 
character code. 

Like "MEN" for 
guys you know. Or 
"GRL" for girls you 
know. Or "FOX" for girls or guys 
you'd like to know. 

But no matter how you choose 
to categorize them, if you can 





. — J5i:7T-t. ---== 


1» fT] 

m 




-J 

Si 


maiMfflg 




lait Hm<* liwji*i*^4 1 




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bM«.t: i[|ttir ti(^, JJ_J 



point and click a 
mouse, you can call 
up any list of friends 
with geoDex's easy- 
to-read graphics. 

Our most in- 
viting feature. Of 
course, once you've 
gotten your friends 
organized, the next thing we 
reconunend you do with geoDex 
is really very simple. 
Throw a party. 
You see, geoDex comes with 
geoMerge, a mail 
merge program that 
customizes form let- 
ters, announcements 
— even party invita- 
tions — with the 
names and addresses 
stored in geoDex. 
First you write the letter with 
geoWrite. Then you select a 





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Put them both 
together with 
geoMerge and it's 
toga time! 

The search is 
over. So if you're 
tired of looking 
for friends, waltz 
right down to your 
software dealer and ask him for 
geoDex. We can't guarantee it'll 
win you more friends, but it'll cer- 
tainly keep you from losing them. 



To order call lSOO-443-0100 ext. 234 
geoDex $39.95 

(California residents add 6. 5% sales tax.) 

S2.5U US/S5.51) ForeiKn for shipping and 
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• One computer should be set for 
originate, the other for answer. 
Many modems have a switch la- 
beled 0/A; you may have to set the 
terminal program as well. In gener- 
al, you should always be in origi- 
nate mode for calling BBSs and 
telecommunications services 
(which are always set to answer), 
but when you call another person, 
one of you has to go to answer 
mode. 

Once you've gotten through to 
the other person, you can start typ- 
ing back and forth. At this point, a 
few more things could go awry: 

• If you see nothing but garbage, 
there's a slight chance that you 
have a lot of static on the phone 
line. More likely, you aren't com- 
municating with the same parame- 
ters. Break the connection and 
decide between you to use either "7 
bits, 1 stop bit, even parity" or "8 
bits, 1 stop bit, no parity," the two 
most common sets of parameters. 
The problem should clear itself up, 

■ In general, you should both be 
communicating at full duplex, 
which means that when you type a 
character, it's sent to the other com- 
puter and then echoed back to your 
terminal. If the phone line is noisy, 
you'll see an occasional character 
that was mangled on the trip over 
or the trip back. In half duplex, your 
terminal program sends the charac- 
ter and prints it to the screen. If 
you're in half duplex and the other 
person is in full duplex, you'll sec 
doubled characters, lliikkee 
tthhiiss, because the terminal pro- 
gram on your end of the line is 
printing the characters to the screen 
and they're also being echoed back 
to you. If you're in full duplex and 
the other person is at half, you'll see 
his messages but won't see any of 
your own. Almost all BBSs and ser- 
vices use full duplex. 

• If upper- and lowercase letters are 
reversed, as in "hELLO. aRE YOU 
THERE?" it means that one of you 
is sending characters in true ASCII 
and the other is using Commodore 
ASCII. Once in a while, you'll see a 
terminal program that uses Com- 
modore's own variation of ASCII, 
but most services work only with 
true ASCII. 

• There's usually a way to turn line- 
feeds off and on from within your 
terminal program. If the screen is 



double-spaced, turn linefeeds off. If 
the screen is zero-spaced- — ^that is, if 
line after line prints in the same 
place — you need to turn linefeeds 
on. Some BBSs start with a prompt 
that asks if you want linefeeds. You 
should usually answer yes (the 
worst that could happen is a 
double-spaced screen). 

The documentation should ex- 
plain how to change various set- 
tings in the program. A few 
functions, like Originate/ Answer, 
may be set by flipping a switch on 
the modem. However, most op- 
tions are changed by sending a 
command to the terminal program. 

There are three ways to change 
settings. One of the most common 
is to hold down the Commodore 
key in the lower left corner and 
press another key on the keyboard. 
For example, Commodore-O might 
open the memory buffer and Com- 
modore-C might close it. 

Some programs give you 
menus, the second way to choose 
settings. Press a key to see the 
menu and then press another key to 
pick one of the choices listed. The 
third way to change parameters is 
via command line. When the line 
appears, you tvpe a command such 
as "dial 5556789". 

Some terminal programs use a 
combination of keys, menus, and 
command lines. Whichever method 
your software uses, it's good to 
learn the most common commands 
and how they work. 

Capturing Text 

Almost all terminal programs offer 
a capture buffer, a section of memo- 
ry to which you can save {or cap- 
ture) text from an online service. 
There's usually a status line that in- 
dicates how much memory is left in 
the buffer. 

Strictly speaking, saving text 
into memory isn't the same as 
downloading. But it's a useful fea- 
ture and it pays to learn how to 
open, close, print, and save the 
buffer. You may have two separate 
commands, like Commodore-O to 
open and Commodore-C to close 
the buffer. Or there may be a single 
"toggle switch" — the first time you 
press Commodore-B the buffer 
opens, but the next time Commo- 
dore-B closes it. 

Remember that the incoming 
text is almost always true ASCII, 



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but it's printed on the screen as 
Commodore ASCII. Usually, the 
save command stores the buffer as 
Commodore ASCII (so you can use 
a word processor to look at it later). 
Some programs have a separate 
store- unformatted (or save-without- 
translation) option which saves the 
file in true ASCII format. 

You'll often have two other op- 
tions: Send the buffer to the printer 
and review the buffer on the screen. 
Some full-featured terminal pro- 
grams also provide editing com- 
mands so you can change text that's 



stored in the buffer. The terminal 
program acts as a limited word 
processor. 

A memory buffer is great for 
uploading and downloading mes- 
sages that include printable charac- 
ters. But buffers are not usually 
suitable for downloading programs, 
for three reasons: the eighth bit, 
control codes, and static on the 
phone lines. 

The Problem 
Of The Eighth Bit 

Remember the example above, 





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ufhere the letter T— ASCII 84 (hex 
$54) — was sent as the number 212 
($D4), because of even parity? 
Since printable ASCII characters 
fall in the range 32-127, any num- 
bers above 127 have the high bit 
stripped off. So, when 212 is re- 
ceived, your terminal program 
automatically subtracts 128 to get 
84 (the letter T). 

Stripping off the eighth bit is 
fine when you're dealing with ordi- 
nary letters, but when it comes to 
machine language or BASIC pro- 
grams, quite often the numbers 
128-255 are essential to the pro- 
gram. With programs or data files, 
it's important to save the bytes ex- 
actly as they're sent, with no trans- 
lation or modification. 

Another problem on Commo- 
dore machines is the conversion 
from true ASCII to Commodore 
ASCII. By the time the capture buff- 
er is finished subtracting 128 and 
changing the numbers around, the 
program in the buffer looks nothing 
like the original program that was 
sent. 

The various calculations that 
strip off the eighth bit and convert 
to Commodore ASCII are impor- 
tant when you're sending text. But 
when you're uploading or down- 
loading, these features become a 
nuisance and should be turned off. 

The second problem can be 
even worse. 

Control Codes 

Let's say you've logged onto a bul- 
letin board and a long, very inter- 
esting message comes into view. It 
starts printing and gradually fills up 
the screen, scrolling line after line, 
too fast for you to read. 

To pause the output, just hold 
down the CTRL key and type S. 
CTRL-S almost always causes the 
computer sending the message to 
stop. To resume the scrolling, press 
CTRL-Q. The ASCII equivalents of 
CTRL-S and CTRL-Q are CHR$(19) 
and CHR$(17). Another common 
control code is CHR$(3), CTRL-C. 
This tells the main computer to stop 
what it's doing; it usually puts you 
back in the main menu. Another 
code, CTRL-2 (CHRS(26}), is often 
used to mark the end of a message. 
And CTRL-H (CHR$(8)) generally 
means backspace; on most systems 
it deletes the most recently sent 
character. 



While you're reading mes- 
sages, the control codes (ASCII 
characters 0-31} act as special com- 
mands to the BBS or telecommuni- 
cations service you're on. These 
codes pose a problem when you 
want to upload or download. 

The characters 19, 17, 3, 26, 
and 8 can occur at numerous places 
within a program, whether it's writ- 
ten in BASIC, machine language, or 
something else. These characters 
can also be found in data files you 
might want to transfer over the 
lines. When you're sending or re- 
ceiving a program, you want 
CHR$(8) to appear as a CHR$(8). It 
shouldn't be translated to a back- 
space. 

Static On The Line 

Telephone lines aren't perfect; once 
in a while a bit of static will inter- 
fere with whatever messages are 
being sent. Static doesn't usually 
disrupt voice communications, but 
it can be deadly to program 
transfers. 

When you're writing a pro- 
gram, a single typing error can 
mean the difference between a pro- 



gram that runs and one that 
doesn't. The same is true for down- 
loading. If static on the line changes 
one character, the program may not 
work correcdy. 

Downloading Protocols: 
Xmodem 

[t should be clear by now that open- 
ing up a memory buffer and captur- 
ing incoming characters is dandy 
for saving normal messages and 
text files, but it's not very reliable 
for transferring programs. 

That's why downloading pro- 
tocols were invented. The most 
popular is called Xmodem (some- 
times called Modem?). There are 
versions of Xmodem for every 
microcomputer. You could use 
Xmodem, for instance, to upload a 
Commodore program to a bulletin 
board running on an Apple or IBM. 
If you downloaded the program lat- 
er, it vvould work perfectly, even 
though it had lived for a while on 
another brand of computer. 

Xmodem treats all characters 
and bytes as eight-bit entities, al- 
though some systems will provide a 
seven-bit option for Xmodem trans- 



fers of ASCII files. The file is divid- 
ed into 128-byte packets, which are 
sent one at a time. Within each 
packet, control codes don't count, A 
CHR$(8) is a CHR$(8), not a back- 
space. Sending eight bits (instead of 
seven) solves the problem of the 
eighth bit; ignoring control-code 
commands solves the problem of 
special characters, 

Xmodem gets around line 
noise by adding a checksum to the 
end of each block. The sending 
computer adds up the 128 numbers 
and appends the sum to the end of 
the packet. In the meantime, the re- 
ceiving computer also adds up the 
numbers. "The two checksums 
should match exactly. If they don't, 
it usually means that some static 
has intervened and garbled one or 
more of the whistles. When some- 
thing goes wrong, the receiving 
computer transmits a signal that 
tells the sender to try again, 

A total of 132 bytes makes up 
an Xmodem block. The first byte is 
a signal that means "Get ready; 
here comes a block." The second is 
the block number (if the file is long- 
er than 255 blocks of 128 bytes. 



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about 32 fC, the block number wraps 
around to zero). The third is the 
block number subtracted from 256. 
For block 50, the second and third 
numbers would be CHR$(50) and 
CHR$(206). The next 128 bytes are 
the program or file data. The final 
byte is the checksum as calculated 
by the sending computer (if the 
checksum is higher than 256, sub- 
tract 256 until you get a number be- 
tween and 255, or just AND with 
255). 

After each block is sent, the 
sending computer pauses for a re- 
sponse from the receiver. There are 
three possible answers. One is a 
code that means "OK, Send the 
next block," The second means 
"Something isn't right. Try again," 
The third possibility is no answer at 
all, in which case the host computer 
waits for 100 seconds before abort- 
ing the transfer. 

Getting Started With Xmodem 

Downloading with Xmodem isn't 
difficult. The main thing you have 
to know is how to tell your terminal 
program to start a download. De- 
pending on the software, you'll 
have to call up a menu, press a key 
{Commodore-X for Xmodem or 
Commodore-R for Receive), or type 
something on a command line (for 
example, XR filename,? might mean 
Xmodem Receive a PRG file). 

After logging on to the bulletin 
board or telecommunications ser- 
vice, go to the download area and 
select a program to download. The 
service will say something like "Ini- 
tiating Xmodem Transfer" or 
"Ready To Send." At this point, 
you can start the download. There's 
no great hurry; the host computer 
will wait for ten 10-second periods, 
more than IVi minutes, before it 
gives up. During that minute and a 
half, you have to tell your computer 
to start the download^by using 
the menu, the key, or the command 
line. At the same time, you need to 
give it a filename for saving to disk. 
In general, the filename can be any- 
thing you choose; it doesn't have to 
be the same as the filename on the 
BBS. 

From the moment you start the 
Xmodem transfer, everything is 
automatic. Many programs will 
print a character on your screen to 
indicate each block that has been 
received successfully. Some termi- 



nal programs will also print the cur- 
rent block number. 

If something goes wrong, like a 
broken connection or an exception- 
ally noisy phone line, the sending 
computer will try ten times before 
giving up. When you've finished, 
you can download another pro- 
gram or go to other areas of the sys- 
tem. After logging off, check the 
disk directory; the file you've 
downloaded should be there. 

System-Specific Protocols 

Some of the large telecommunica- 
tions services have their own proto- 
cols for downloading. On Quantum- 
Link, for example, you use a 
terminal program that works only 
on QuantumLink. Downloading is 
automatic. You choose a file, give it 
a name for your disk, and the down- 
load begins without any trouble. 

CompuServe can be accessed 
by almost any terminal program 
that communicates in ASCII. To 
download from CompuServe, your 
terminal program should support 
either Xmodem or CompuServe-B 
protocols. Files on CompuServe 
have six-character names followed 
by a period and an extension. The 
.IMG extension means a file was 
uploaded with CompuServe-D pro- 
tocol, while .BIN means it was 
uploaded with Xmodem. Exten- 
sions such as .DOC, .TXT, and 
.ASC mean the file is ASCII charac- 
ters (text or documentation); such 
files are often instructions for pro- 
grams, or help files that explain 
some aspect of CompuServe. 

With CompuServe's Vidtex 
program, or any other terminal that 
supports Compu5erve-B protocol, 
downloads are almost automatic. A 
file that ends with ,IMG contains a 
header that indicates whether it's a 
program or sequential file, .BIN 
files don't contain this information, 
so you have to add ",p" to the file- 
name (SPACEGAME,P for ex- 
ample) to download it as a PRG file. 

If you're using Xmodem on 
CompuServe, .BIN files will trans- 
fer without fuss. But when you're 
downloading .IMG programs, the 
header that indicates what type of 
file it is may cause some problems. 
Some Xmodem programs automati- 
cally strip off the header from .IMG 
files. If your program doesn't do 
this, you'll have to download a sep- 
arate program called B1N1MG.BIN 



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that removes the CompuServe 
header from .IMG files. 

A BBS that runs on a non- 
Commodore machine {Apple, 
Atari, IBM, Radio Shack, or other 
brands) will almost always use 
ASCII for the messages. If there's a 
download area, you'll probably 
need a terminal program that sup- 
ports Xmodem protocol. 

Commodore bulletin boards 
usually run in standard ASCII, al- 
though some might use Commo- 
dore ASCII instead. If upper- and 



able on the BBS or service that 
contains the squeezed or library 
files. 

Squeezing and libraries are 
common on CP/M machines. 
They're becoming very popular on 
Commodore computers as well. 

The idea behind squeezing is 
that you start with a program or 
data file and run it through a utility 
that makes it smaller without losing 
any information. The smaller file 
takes less time to upload and down- 
load and also saves disk space. A 



Most systems recognize the HELP 
command ... and will respond with a 
list of possible actions and things you 
can do while you're online. 



lowercase letters are switched, then 
you'll need to adjust your terminal 
program (or find one that uses the 
right kind of ASCII). A popular 
transfer protocol for systems run- 
ning on 64s is called "Punter proto- 
col," after its inventor, Steve Punter 
(who also wrote the word processor 
WordPro). The use of Punter proto- 
col has generated heated discussion 
among sysops of Commodore bul- 
letin boards. One side argues that 
Punter uploads and downloads are 
faster and often more reliable than 
Xmodem. Others say that Xmodem 
has long been the standard and that 
Punter {as a Commodore-specific 
protocol) keeps many non-Com- 
modore users away. 

Squeezing And Libraries 

Owners of the 128 who use CP/M 
mode to call CP/M bulletin boards 
{or visit the CP/M area on a nation- 
al service) will almost certainly run 
into squeezed files and library files. 
After you've downloaded a squeezed 
file, you have to unsqueeze it with 
the CP/M program called USQ- 
,COM before you can use it. For 
library files, you need a program 
called NULU.COM (NULU means 
new libran/ ufility). Both USQ and 
NULU are public domain pro- 
grams, and they're usually avail- 

48 COMPUTEfs Gazette January 1&B7 



file that's originally 30K long might 
squeeze down to 24K {a savings of 
20 percent). When you call a service 
like CompuServe or make a long 
distance phone call to a bulletin 
board, you're paying by the minute. 
If the file is smaller, you pay less for 
the connect time. 

One way to squeeze a text file 
is through Huffman encoding, 
which takes the characters that oc- 
cur most often (space, c, t, a, o, i, n, 
and so on) and sends them as a 
smaller number of bits: four, five, or 
six, instead of seven or eight. This is 
similar to Morse code, where the 
letter E is a dot and T is a dash. 
Since these are the two characters 
most often used, messages are sent 
faster if the popular codes are short. 

Graphics files can be squeezed 
with run length encoding (RLE), 
which looks for repetitions of cer- 
tain characters. If the character 
color for a Commodore screen is 
purple on the top row (40 charac- 
ters) and blue on the new two rows, 
color memory will hold 40 fours 
followed by 80 sixes. An RLE file, 
instead of 120 characters, might 
contain a CHR£(40), CHR$(4), 
CHRS(80), CHR${6), which means 
repeat 40 times the number 4, and 
then repeat 80 times the number 6. 
Hi-res pictures are often squeezed 



using this method. GEOS pictures 
are also stored in RLE-type files. 

Library utilities are useful 
when a single program needs sev- 
eral files — say, a BASIC program 
that has a separate ML program and 
a data file. Instead of having to 
download three separate files, you 
download the single libra'ry file and 
then use the NULU (or other library 
programs like ARC220) to dissolve 
the library into its constituent parts. 
Library utilities usually perform 
some sort of squeezing at the same 
time. 

Asking For Help 

If you're new to telecommunica- 
tions and modems, there are many 
sources of help. User groups 
usually have several members who 
are knowledgeable about the arca- 
na of modems; many user groups 
also have several public domain 
terminal programs available at a 
nominal cost (generally S2-3 to 
cover the cost of the disk). Some 
user groups also sponsor a bulletin 
board. 

Whenever you're puzzled by a 
certain aspect of downloading, 
leave a message for the sysop. If 
you explain what you're trying to 
do and what happened, the sysop 
will generally offer some sugges- 
tions. If you leave a public message, 
you'll often get a reply from experi- 
enced members, offering sugges- 
tions and hints. 

Most systems recognize the 
HELP command (sometimes just H 
or ?) and will respond with a list of 
possible actions and things you can 
do while you're online. 

It never hurts to experiment, 
either. If the first thing you see 
when you log onto a BBS is "LF 
(Y/N)?" it's probably a reference to 
whether or not you want linefeeds. 
You might not know if you want 
linefeeds, so take a wild guess. 
There's a 50-percent chance you'll 
get it right. If things don't look 
right, log off and try again. The 
commands OFF, BYE, EXIT (or just 
X) will usually get you out. The 
most drastic way to leave is to sim- 
ply turn off your computer. 

There are a lot of good pro- 
grams available on bulletin boards 
and telecommunications services. 
With a little perseverance, you'll 
soon be downloading some great 
programs. W 






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Based on tne cult classic, 
one Of the Dest games ever, 
sure to become a Bestseller... 
a classic; -Commodore 
COfnouttng (United Kingdom) 
For tfte commodore S4 and 
128, ana Apple ii computer 
svstems. 



Splndbiv 

A 3-0 arcade strategy 
adventure. ■ Stunningly 
original. ..fiendlsMly com- 
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superb.. >Amstra a Action 
lunited Kingdomi 
FOP the commodore 6a and 
12S. and Apple ri computer 
systems. 




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zolds 

war machines in deadly 
battle.' ...sopliisticated, 
absorbing and addictive..!' 
-computer and Video Games 
(United Kingdom) 
For the CommotJore ga and 
12B. and coming soon for 
Apple II computer systems. 



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Decipede 



James Knesek 

You'd belter keep uhwiiig if you waut a high score iii this 
game. GiaJit spiders, wasps, ami d r ago }i flies are among the 
beasts you'll have to contend with. For the Commodore 64. A 
joystick is required. 



"What a beautiful day for a picnic," 
you say to yourself as you sit down 
on I he newly mowed grass and pre- 
pare yourself for a nice, pleasant 
lunch. But just as vou begin to un- 
fold your napkin, the birds stop 
singing, the crickets stop chirping, 
and a dark cloud begins to form in 
the sky above. A gardener in faded 
overalls rims by, looking over his 
shoulder as he .scurries along, and 
shouts, "Better get goin', there's a 
whole garden full of critters on the 
move." As you ponder this strange 
comment, a huge decipede sudden- 
ly appears at your side and rudely 
devours your lunch. The creature, 
apparently unsatisfied, begins to 
turn its attention to you. It's a good 
thing you brought along your in- 
secticide gun today. 

"Decipede" is an arcade-style 
action game that requires skill and 
dexterity. The object of the game is 

50 COMPUTE rs Gezatta January 19B7 



to destroy all of the assaulting crea- 
tures with poison pellets before 
they have a chance to touch your 
insecticide gun. At the start of each 
game, you're given three guns with 
which to destroy the decipede and 
the other creatures. 



01l«3 2 JCOBC 2O0II 



•.•."••KM:-V! 



i;.:V"\,. 



J 1 1 1 



-» 1 1 1 ..« 



77it' player (the spade) is being chased 
by a ifsider (the large X) as the decipede 
lu'iirs f/ic ImttoDi of the screen. 



The Cast Of Characters 

Your enemies are not easily defeat- 
ed. Possibly the most malicious of 
the bunch is the grasshopper. His 
diagonal movement in your area 
makes him hard to destroy and dif- 
ficult to avoid. 

The attack wave ends only 
after the destruction of the entire 
decipede (all ten segments) or your 
own demise. With the successful 
(from your point of view) comple- 
tion of an attack wave, the colors of 
the screen objects change, and the 
enemies speed up. Each wave starts 
in a new patch of clover. 

Your score is displayed at the 
end of each attack wave. The scores 
you receive for destroying the ene- 
mies are 25 points for each clover, 
50 for each decipede section, 200 
for each grasshopper, 400 for each 
dragonfly, and 1200 for each wasp. 
You are awarded a new gun every 
12,000 points. 

The decipede is quite a mon- 
ster itself as it weaves its way 
through the clover and down the 
screen towards your gun. Once it 



l*B"|ff^ "^P^^^iisH^ 



\ 


R 


mot 


«^^^^^Hv^2^' '- 


i! 


> 

** 


I THF AKACK 

■ ' . ■ . . . ■ '-S 


^jcjjigj 


?1^ 






Ttie Apache. . , Fierce and efuswa like its warrior 
namesake. . , Capable of defeating enemy tanks, 
infantry, and hostile aircraft on the moctern elec- 
trofiic battlefield. 

Cunship's revdutlonarv 3-D graDWcs enatjfe vou 
the pilot, to fly into the worftt's tiottest trouble 
spots. . . You'll use an unbelievable array of nigh 
tech tnformatton and weapon systems, Includino, 
lasers, video cameras, niont viewers, radar warn- 
ings. Jammers, computers, missiles, rockets, flares. 
and a SOmm cannon' Successful missions w«i be 
arded with medals and rank promotions ''* 
perience the danger and exdtemenc of 3tt 
copter action . . . ytxjr latest adventure in 
ever-growing line of MicroProse Simulation Si 
ware. 

Challenge the enemy, the sky. and yourself 
this extraordinary simulation! i 





>re64/i28anaAtanxu 
>^cdiriputerssta sugsested retail of$M.95: also 
far Applell Family. IBM PC/PC Jr. TandvlOOO. Atari 
ST and Amiga at: $3995. Call or write fi)r specific 
mactvnp avaitabiHtY. and for MC/VISA orders If 
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ia UK^ Oriw ■ Hurt Vailey, MP 21030 • (301} 77M151 



has reached the bottom Hne of the 
screen, it weaves around in your 
area of the playing field until either 
vou or it is destroyed. Another for- 
midable enemy is the wasp. She 
never comes down to your part of 
the screen, but when she passes 
over a clover, she changes it to a di- 
amond . A d e c i p ed e i\' i 1 1 d i \' e 
straight down toward you if it runs 
into one of these diamonds. The 
least harmful of the attackers is the 
dragonfly. It usually dives straight 
down toward you, which makes it 
an easy target. However, the drag- 
onfly leaves a trail of clover behind 
which hastens the decipede's dan- 
gerous descent. 

The insecticide gun can move 
anywhere within the bottom four 
rows of the screen. Be careful, be- 
cause the gun moves very quickly. 
Hold down the fire button of the 
joystick for rapid fire. 

Getting Started 

Decipede has two parts: one BASIC 
and one machine language. Type in 
and save Program 1 as you would 
any other BASIC program. The ma- 
chine language portion (Program 2) 
must be typed in with "MI.X," the 
machine language entry program 
found elsewhere in this issue. 
Before you begin typing in Program 
2, be sure to read and understand 
the instructions for using MLX. 
When you run MLX, you'll be 
asked for a starting address and an 
ending address. Here are the correct 
values for Program 2; 

starting address: CUOO 
Ending .iddress: C91F 

When you finish entering the data 
from Program 2, be sure to save a 
copy with the name DliC ML. 
That's the name Program 1 expects 
the file to have (see line 20 of Pro- 
gram 1), For disk users, the DEC 
Ml, file must be on the same disk as 
Program 1. For tape, change the 
,8,1 in line 20 of Program 1 to ,1,L 
Also, be sure that the DEC ML file 
immediately follows Program 1 on 
the tape, 

When you're ready to play Dec- 
ipede, load and run Program 1. Be 
sure that the joystick is plugged 
into port 2. When the title screen 
appears, press the joystick fire but- 
ton to begin play. 
See program Usiings on page 118. ffi 



52 COMPUWs Gazette January 1987 



Connect 'Em 



Francis Chatiibers 



This pro;^ra)ii is rtf/ adaptation of the classic "Connect the 
Dots" game, updated to allow you play against a friend or the 
computer. Or you can watch the computer play against itself. 
For the Commodore 64, 128, Plus/4, and 16. One or two joy- 
sticks are required. 



As you probably recall, the venera- 
ble game "Connect the Dots" be- 
gins with a grid of dots drawn on a 
piece of paper. Two players take 
turns drawing lines connecting the 
dots. If you complete a square, you 
put vour initial in it and move 
again. When all the squares have 
been captured, the player with the 
most wins. 

Playing the game is even easier 
on the computer. In "Connect 
'Em." the computer draws the dots 
and lines, and keeps a running 
count of the scores. The game also 
lets you play against a friend or the 
computer, or sit back and watch the 
computer match wits with itself. 

There are two board sizes to 
choose from — regular (84 boxes) 
and mini (42 boxes). 

Type in and save a copy of the 
version for your computer — Pro- 
gram 1 for the 64 or Program 2 for 
the 128, The 128 version ivill also 
work on the Plus/4 and Commo- 
dore 16 with the following modi- 
fications; 

DX 50 PRINT" [CLR}"tS=3072!C=-l 

024 jRR=205 :CC=1 339 !CU=ei 

:CL=2:OX=46:P1=0:P2=0! IN 

5=""!LX=28:UX=12 

KF 680 PRINT "{BLU}T0 PLAY AGAI 

KST THE CO.MPUTER, ":PRIN 

T "ENTER [RED1PLUS4 1BLU) 

OR (RED}C-16liiLU] FOR" 

BX 7 30 tJC{T) = Fl + 16*4:IF PL5(T) 

= "PLUS4" OR PI,5(T) = "C-1 

6" THEN F2=F2+1 ;PC$(T)= 

"X" 

After you've typed in and saved 
the appropriate version, load the 
program and type RUN. The com- 
puter asks for the names of the play- 



•:.;■■ J^W' ''^ft 

.:i)RvnH'S 1 lie II 



„r_t lj_„__.,.,_ 




tammamamnmmmtwimnnm 

The computer is an iutetUgeiU foe in 
"Connect Tm." 



ers. If you want the computer to 
plav either or both positions, enter 
the'name C-64, C-128, PLUS4, orC- 
16, depending on your computer. 

The computer moves on its 
own, but people need to use a joy- 
stick (player 1 uses port 1 and play- 
er 2 uses port 2). To make a move, 
use the joystick to place the marker 
(a little blue ball) on one of the dots 
that you wish to connect; then press 
the joystick fire button. Now move 
the marker to the other dot and 
press the fire button again. A line 
will be drawn connecting the two 
dots. Only adjacent dots can be 
connected. The computer doesn't 
make illegal moves, nor does it 
allow you to make them. 

When a square is captured, the 
appropriate initial is placed in it. 
(Don't worry if both players have 
the same initial.s — the squares are 
also color-coded.) At the end of the 
game, the computer displays the 
winner's name. 
See program listings on page ill. 'B 



suss* 



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Cl]OPllft©(§ll^D 




Screen Tricks 



If you've discovered a clever time- 
saving technique or a brief but 
effective programming shortcut, 
send it to "Hints & Tips," c/o 
COMPUTEl'S GAZETTE. // we use 
it, we'll pay you $35. We regret 
that, due to the volume of items 
submitted, we cannot reply indi- 
vidually to submissions. 

Controlling Scrolling 

Charles Allison 

Did you ever wish you could have a 
menu at the top of a screen that 
didn't scroll away as text filled the 
screen? This short program allows 
you to keep a message or menu at 
the top of the screen. It transfers the 
operating system to RAM and altem 
a single byte of the scrolling routine, 

HC 10 DATA 169,160,133,252,169 

,222,133,254 
HE 20 DATA 169,0,133,251,133,2 

53, 160,0,177 
JJ 3B DATA 251,145,251,177,253 

,145,25 3,136,208,245,230 

,252,2 30,254,208,2 37,96 
MD 40 FOR T=49152 TO 49135 sREA 

D A:POKE T,A;NEXT T 
DP 50 SYS 49152 :POKE 59639,10 
GO 60 POKE l.PEEKd) AND 253 
KE 70 PRINT" (CLR)": LIST 

Run the program. Now list it a cou- 
ple of times. See how the top lines 
stay put while the rest of the screen 
scrolls by? If you'd like the message 
area to be a different size, put the 
desired number of screen lines mi- 
nus one into the POKE statement in 
line 50. For example, if you want 
three lines for a message or menu, 
type POKE 59639,2. If you POKE a 
number greater than 24, scrolling is 
disabled completely. POKE 59639, 
255 to return to normal scrolling. 

The bottom scroll line can also 
be changed. Try this; POKE 
59652,20. 

Quick Character Editor 

Mitchell Ross 

There are many excellent utilities 
for designing custom characters on 
the 64. But if you just want to create 

54 COMPUTBfs Gazefte January 1987 



one character, it's a lot of trouble to 
load in a font editor, make the 
changes, save the new font out to a 
file, go back to BASIC, and load the 
font back in. This simple character 
editor is perfect in such cases. Just 
design the character in the DATA 
statements. Use the cursor keys to 
move around and alter the charac- 
ter. In the program below, a small 
man has been designed. Be sure to 
press RETURN on each data line 
after it is displayed on the screen. 

MX 10 DATA "12 SPACES)**** 

(2 SPACES j" 
XS 20 DATA "t2 SPACES)**** 

[2 SPACES] " 

ma 30 data " [ 3 spaces ) * * 
1 3 spaces!" 

PQ 40 DATA ■'********" 
GB 50 DATA "** ** **" 
AD 60 DATA "[2 SPACES }***• 

[2 SPACES j" 
HC ?70 DATA " **U SPACES)** " 
MC 80 DATA "**[4 SPACES)**" 
MH 90 INPUT"LINE NUMBER FOR DA 

TA LItIE";DL 
AK 100 PRINT DLr"DATA"; 
BH 110 FOR 1=0 TO 7: READ A^tT- 

0JFOR J=0 TO 7£B=0!lF M 

ID$(A5,J+1,1)="*" THEN 

ISPACE)B=1 
JF 120- T=T+B*2T{7-J) :NEXT:PRIN 

TT'MLEFT), "r :NEXT:PRINT 

"UEFTI " 

When you're satisfied with the 
character you've created, type 
RUN. You'll be asked at which line 
number you'd like to create the 
data. For now, answer 10000. The 
program will respond by displaying 
the data for the character. This pro- 
gram reads the character DATA 
statements and prints out the 
equivalent numeric data. You can 
either write down the values and 
use them later, or you can run the 
cursor up to the DATA line and 
press RETURN to enter it into the 
program. This should be a great 
help any time you need a new char- 
acter quickly. 

If you want to see how your 
new character looks, follow these 
instructions: 

1 , Type in the program below, 

2, Run it. 



3. Choose 3 as the DATA line 
number. 

4. Press RETURN on the DATA line. 

5. Type GOTO 130. 

6. Press @ to see your character. 

DM 125 STOP 

BK 130 POKE 52, 48! POKE 56,48:? 

OKE 56334, PEEK(56334)AN 

D2S4:P0KE 1 , PEEK( 1 )AND2 

51 
MK 140 FOR 1=0 TO SlllPOKE I+l 

2288,PEEK(I+53248) sNEXT 

!POKE 1,PEEK(1) OR 4 
CE 150 POKE 56334, PEEK(S6334)0 

RItPOKE 53272, (PEEK(532 

72)AND240)+12 
QB 170 FOR 1=0 TO 7: READ A:P0K 

E 12288+1, AsNEXT I 

Default With Variables 

Joseph R. Chametski 

Many programmers use a statement 
with the following general format to 
give the user a default choice when 
answering an input prompt. (A de- 
fault choice is one that will be select- 
ed if the user presses RETURN 
instead of typing in an answer.) 

[NPUT'TROMPT{2 SPACES }Y{3 LEFT) 
";A$ 

This works very well most of the 
time. The {3 LEFT} makes the cur- 
sor back up over the Y. If you want 
to use YES instead of Y, then you'd 
have to use {5 LEFT} instead. 

You can see the problem: What 
if the length of the default answer is 
unknown? What if the variable is a 
number or word? The solution is to 
do something like this; 
FRINT'TROMPT ";X;;POKE C,6:INPUT X 

where C is 211 for the 64 and the 
VIC, 202 for the Plus/4 and the 16, 
and 236 for the 128. This forces the 
cursor to go to the column indicated 
by the POKE. In this case, the cur- 
sor goes to the sixth column. Of 
course, if you change the prompt, 
you'll have to change the column 
number to the number of characters 
in the prompt. If you use this tech- 
nique with a string, type two spaces 
after the prompt instead of one. m 



WHICHEVER DOOR YOU CHOOSE, 

THE PRIZE IS FUN AND EXCITEMENT 

BEYOND YOUR WILDEST 

FANTASIES! 



PDDI^ 




' Vour quest for the best fantasy 
game is over. You've found not one, 
but three... from SSI. Tlic play wul 
feel of each game may differ; but 
in terms of fun, excitement and 
chiliOTge, all three are enually ex- 
hilarattng, intense, and absorbing. 

WIZARD'S CROWN" 

Guide eight v'aliani advcntufere on a 
perilous quest to recover liie precious 
Wizard's Cro™ that lies Imprisoned 
Ijchind speU-w-ovcn nails in the tuins 
of \rgtian. Armed with different skills 
and *^pons, )'OUr characters must 
search for clues amoi^ the maze of 



your heroes dash widi the vile den- 
izens of Afghan, you can let the 
computer resolve each battle quickly, 
or you can personally direct the action 
with a multitude of combat optiuns. 
On diskette for 64K Apple* Atori" 
OM'. $39.95. 



GEMSTONE HEALER- 

This is the sequel to our best -selling 
Gemstom Warrior" in ivtich you 
braved the horrors of the Nedicr- 
world and successfully recovered tlie 
magical Genistone. Tb your dismay, 
you discover that die Gcmsionc has 
been damaged. Hence, you must 
return to die Demons' lair, locate the 
Healing Tools and heal die Gemsione. 



Getmtone Warnor because everyone 
*itl enjoy GEMSTOME HEALERs 
&st- paced, action-packed eiKitement. 

OndIaJu:neri>r64KAppte'^ 
C-MT*».9J. 



PIUNTASIB II 

This role-playing game promises to 
duplicate the phenomenal success 
that die first Fbamasie~ achieved. 
In PHANTASIE n, die Dark Lord 
Eishioned an evU orb diat has cn- 
slaw-d your people. Command a band 
of one to sii; trawUcrs to brave (he 
Dark Lord's wrath, locate tlie orb 
and find a way to destroy it. If you've 
played the original Bmntaste, you 



to this sequel. If you ha^im't, simply 
create new characters and embait 
on a ihtllling mission! 
On diskette (at ^\ Applet C-MI 

Atari ST* JJ9.95. 



S^l! 



Now thafWBWhaiiWtantalirfng 
peek at the bntastic advcntua-s , 
beyond, will It be Doorri, Door#2,j' 
or Door lli'i The hesl answer; Why, 
all three, of course! 

To get started, you'll have to 
open another door, diat of your local 
computct/sofmare or game store. 

If there are no convenient stores near 
you, VISA Jiid JlMtcrtliud hoidtrs can 
order by calUnj! toll- free 800 -Mi 4 100, 
i335. To tiider by mail, s<uk1 your cJu-ck 
to: Suatrglc SlmuLiilflns. Inc.. 1l^i6 
S, Rengstorff Are., Mountain View, til 
9^Wi. Be sure to spcdfj' die computer 
fonnal of the game, CallforTiii residents, 
please add appliciblc sales U\. 

Add urn 10 your onler for shipping 
and handling. All(w4-<i wdo for dclhny. 
In die Gontineniai U.S., ll¥S. Blue senta 
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c,986bv STRATEGIC SIMULATIONS, INC. 



All rights (eservod. 



Keyword 
Construction Set 



Rick Bauer 



This clever utility lets you easily change the spelling of any 
BASIC keywords. It's especially helpful if you speak or teach a 
language other than English. A French or Spanish version, for 
example, would be easy to create. For the Commodore 64. 



BASIC has many commands and 
statements. Keywords like PRINT, 
INPUT, RUN, and NEW are all 
built-in. "Keyword Construction 
Set" lets you replace some or all of 
these words with new ones. For ex- 
ample, if your first language is 
Spanish, you can replace BASIC 
keywords with Spanish words of 
your choice. Since I usually pro- 
gram in machine language, I made 
the following alterations to BASIC: 
I replaced PEEK with LDA, POKE 
with STA, GOSUB with JSR, RE- 
TURN with RTS, and GOTO with 
JMP. This makes it easier for me to 
translate BASIC programs into ma- 
chine language. Of course, you may 
just want to use Keyword Construc- 
tion Set to experiment with some 
new keywords while programming. 
It can be refreshing to see WRITE 
A,B,C instead of PRINT A,B,C. 

Keyword Construction Set is 
written in BASIC. To use it, type it 
in and save a copy. Load it; then 
type RUN. You're prompted fof the 
name of your "new" language. The 
program uses this response as the 
filename for your modified BASIC 
language. Next, the program asks if 

56 COMPUTEI's Gazefta January 1987 



you want a list of your new key- 
words to go to your printer. Print- 
ing out your keywords is a good 
idea — otherwise, you may find 
you've forgotten a few of them the 
next time you sit down at your com- 
puter. The program assumes that 
your printer is connected as device 
4. If this isn't the case, change the 
OPEN statement in line 200. For 
example, if your printer is device 5, 
change the second 4 in the OPEN 
statement to a 5. 

Choosing Your Words 

Now you're ready to enter your 
new instruction set. The ROM 
(Read Only Memory) keywords are 
listed one at a time on the screen. 
As each one is displayed, type in 
your replacement keyword. If you 
want to use the standard BASIC 
keyword, just press RETURN. The 
new keyword can be any length, 
but the total number of characters 
in all keywords must not exceed 
255, Since there are 76 keywords 
that can be changed, your new 
keywords should average four to 
five characters. The top line of the 
screen tells you how many charac- 



ters you've used so far and how 

many characters are over or under 
the original set {try to keep this 
number less than or equal to zero). 
For example, if you replace NEW 
with ERASE, you should compen- 
sate by making another keyword 
two letters shorter (SAVE into SV, 
for example). 

If a keyword ends with a spe- 
cial character, like $ or ), it's a good 
idea to retain that character in your 
new keyword. If you don't, things 
could get unnecessarily confusing. 
When you finish (the last keyword 
to change is GO), the computer 
asks whether it should save your 
language to disk or tape. Answer D 
for disk or T for tape to create a 
machine language fUe of your mod- 
ified BASIC. 

When you want to use your 
new dialect of BASIC, type these 
lines: 

LOAD ■'fitename",S,l 
NEW 
SYS 49152 

Now your keywords are en- 
abled. Load a BASIC program to 
test your Janguage. Type LIST. You 
should see your keywords in the 
BASIC program. You may return to 
the standard BASIC definitions at 
any time by pressing RUN/STOP- 
RESTORE. Type SYS 49152 to 
reenable your new language. 
See program listing on page 115. 9 



UNLEASH YOUR CREATIVE GENIUS 



Acdvision Creativity Software gives you all 
the tools you'll ever need. 




Like 77ie Music Studioi:' 

Compose and edit any 
musical score quickly and 
easily using features and 
power unnnatched by other 
music programs. Mozart 
never had it so good! 






a""„VM or 



>^oi^S^^*^- 




Deck the halls! Paper 
Models": The Chriatmaa 
Kit™ turns your computer 
into Santa's workshop. 
Three-dimensional decora- 
tions including ornaments, 
gift boxes, and Christmas 
villages are yours at the 
touch of a key. Decorate 
using the clip-art library or 
customize your own with 
the paint program. 



PyfflfflRKS 



Picture this, Paintworlcs!!' 
the easy-to-use, complete 
graphics editor and paint 
program. Lets you design 
cards, stationery, newslet- 
ters, musical slideshows, or 
just plain doodle. Features 
color cycling for animation 
effects, 3 work screens, mul- 
tiple brushes and instant 
color blending to bring out 
the artist in you. 




Have a great idea for a game? With Garry Kitchen's GameMalcer™: The 
Computer Game Design Kiti'^ you can create computer games using 5 pro- 
fessional quality design tools in one easy-to-use program. Or get a head start with 
pre-designed images and eSects.TheGameMaltcrDt'sifjner's Sportu Library^" 
lets you create your favorite sports games from football and baseball to skiing and 
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Mastering 128 Sound 

And Music 

Part 4 



D. C. Holmes 



In this installment, the author examines the FILTER statement, 
an important function in refining sound on the 128. Included 
are two impressive musical demonstrations of the techniques. 



Last month, we discussed the prin- 
ciples of tonal quality and learned 
how to use the ENVELOPE state- 
ment. This month, we'll examine 
the FILTER statement, a tool which 
allows us to further refine the tim- 
bre of a sound on the 128, 

Filtering operates by the pro- 
cess of stibtractive synthesis; that is, 
the final sound is achieved by selec- 
tively eliminating certain overtones 
from the waveform prescribed by 
an ENVELOPE command. As an 
example, imagine a horn player 
who comes to a session carrying 
four horns and a box of mutes. He 
could play his part on a trumpet, a 
cornet, a bugle, or a fliigelhorn. 
Even though the frequency of the 
notes would be identical, the timbre 
of the sounds would be different for 
each instrument, due to tubing con- 
figurations and other unique physi- 
cal properties of the horns. Like- 
wise, our SID chip can piay the 
same character string using differ- 
ent envelopes, and even though the 
pitch of the notes is the same, the 
sounds may be very different. 

The musician may choose to 
fine-tune his sound by using one of 
his mutes. Muting changes the tonal 
quality by blocking certain over- 
tones in the natural sound of the in- 
strument, and allowing only 
selected harmonics to pass through 
and be heard. He could use a cup 
mute to produce a muffled, but mel- 

58 COMPUTBf's Gezette January 19B7 



low, sound. Or a Vaccianno mute 
would give a bright, tinny character 
to his instrument. Using the same 
mute on another instrument has a 
similar effect on that instrument, but 
the sound of a cup-muted trumpet 
can still be easily distinguished from 
the sound of a cup-muted fliigel- 
horn because of the individual char- 
acteristics of the fundamental 
(unmuted) tones. In the same way, 
we can use the SID filter to block 
certain harmonics, allowing others 
to be heard in the waveform of 
Commodore 128 sounds. 

The SID filter system employs 
three muting filters, which can be 
used singly or in combination. 
These are the low-pass, high-pass, 
and band-pass filters. 

The low-pass filter blocks 
overtones above a specified fre- 
quency (the cutoff frequency) and 
allows overtones below that fre- 
quency to be played and heard. 
This produces sounds which are 
characteristically full and rich, lack- 
ing brightness. This filtering method 
is illustrated in Figure 1. 

The high-pass filter does the 
reverse: It tells the SID chip to filter 
out frequencies below the cutoff, 
and allows those above the cutoff to 
pass through to be heard (Figure 2). 
These sounds are described as hol- 
low or tinny, as opposed to mellow 
or solid. 

The band-pass filter supresses 



all but a narrow range of frequen- 
cies above and below the cutoff (see 
Figure 3). 

When all three filters are used 
simultaneously, frequencies 
throughout the range of the SID 
chip are allowed to pass (Figure 4). 
Conversely, when the FILTER is 
enabled (PLAY"X1"), but all three 
filters are turned off, no sound is al- 
lowed to pass through (Figure 5). 

Combining the low-pass and 
band-pass filters produces essen- 
tially a modified low-pass effect. 
Likewise, combining the high-pass 
and band-pass gives a modified 
high-pass effect. 

Combining the low-pass and 
high-pass creates an interesting sit- 
uation in which a range of frequen- 
cies near the cutoff are filtered out, 
and all other frequencies above and 
below are allowed to pass through 
the SID chip. This is often referred 
to as a notch reject or band-stop fil- 
ter (Figure 6). 

The format for the FILTER 
statement is 
FILTER cf,lp,bp,hp,res 
where 

cf •= filler cutoff frequency (0-2047) 
Ip = low-pass filter on (1), off (0) 
bp = band-pass filter on (1), off tO) 
ftp = high-pass filter on (1), off (0) 
res — resonance (0-15) 

The value of the cf parameter 
determines the cutoff frequency of 
the SID filter, but the numeric value 
of this parameter should not be 
confused with the actual cutoff fre- 
quency. The frequency at which the 
cutoff occurs varies according to the 
frequency of the note played. When 





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Figure 1 



Figure 2 



CUTOFF 




FREQUENCY OF HARMONIC 



Figure 3 




FREQUENCY OF HARMONIC 



Figure 4 



CUTOFF 

I 



FREQUENCY OF HARMONIC 



FREQUENCY OF HARMONIC 



Figure 5 



CUTOFF 




FREQUENCY OF HARMONIC 

cf = 0, the cutoff will be placed 
such that it is below the frequency 
of virtually all of the naturally oc- 
curring overtones in a sound. A val- 
ue of 2047 places the cutoff at a 
frequency higher than virtually all 
of the natural overtones. If the cut- 
off value is 1023, the relative distri- 
bution of overtones will determine 
a cutoff frequency where half of the 
overtones are below it, and half are 
above it. Thus, the value of cf does 
not specify the exact cutoff frequen- 

60 COMPUTE! s GazoMe January 1987 



FREQUENCY OF HARMONIC 

cy, but rather the amount of filter- 
ing desired. 

The parameters ip, hp, and hp 
simply toggle the three individual 
filters on and off. One, two, or all 
three may be enabled at the same 
time, or they may all be turned off. 

Resonance is a process where- 
by frequencies near the cutoff are 
accentuated. The degree of this 
peaking effect may range from no 
resonance {res = 0) to very pro- 
nounced (res = 15). Increasing the 



value tends to sharpen or clarify the 
Lonal quality. 

Through The Filter 

Only one filter configuration, speci- 
fied by a single FILTER statement, 
may be used by the SID chip at any 
one time. The same configuration 
applies to all three voices, and 
whether or not a voice is filtered is 
determined by the PLAY statement. 
For this, the form of the PLAY 
statement is 

PLAY "VnXM" 

The V« command selects the 
current voice (n can be 1-3). If no V 
command is used, the default is 
voice 1. The Xn command specifies 
whether the current voice will be 
passed through the filter. Filtering 
is turned on when « is 1 and off 
when it is 0. The default setting is 
equivalent to XO {filtering off). 
Once filtering is turned on for a par- 
ticular voice, that voice will contin- 
ue to be filtered until it is turned off 
with XO. The same FILTER state- 
ment configuration applies to all 
three voices when they are filtered, 
but each voice can be individually 
filtered or unfiltered. 

The first of this month's pro- 
grams, "Saints," includes a filter 
editor for experimentation. The 
melody voice plays a line of a Dixie- 
land tune, and then answers in the 
same envelope, but with the filter 
turned on. Changing the parame- 
ters of the filter will produce nofice- 
able differences in the filtering 
effect. Only voice 1 is filtered in this 
program. 

Program 2 is named "Joy," and 
is my computer interpretation of 
Bach's classic "Jesu, Joy of Man's 
Desiring." This version is an organ- 
like arrangement of the well- 
known work. I always marvel at the 
way a good pipe organist can filter 
the sounds by controlling the lou- 
vers on the pipe cabinet. Just like 
the mutes the horn player uses, the 
openings created by these louvers 
allow selected harmonic frequen- 
cies to pass through, while others 
are blocked. 

Joy (Program 2) brings togeth- 
er most of the topics we've dis- 
cussed thus far in this series. Use 
your imagination and play with the 
TEMPO, VOL, ENVELOPE, and 
FILTER statements to customize 
this program. 
See program listings on page 116. • 




BOW 




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User Group Update 



When writing to a user group for information, please remember to 
enclose a self-addressed envelope with postage that is appropriate for 
the country to which you're writing. 

Send typed additions, corrections, and deletions for this list to: 

COMPUTE! Publications 
P.O. Box 5406 
Greensboro, NC 27403 
Attn: Commodore User Groups 

User Group Notes 

The Promenade User Group of America has formed to assist users of 
the Promenade and Commodore 64. For more information on this 
group, write P.O. Box 4224, White Plains Station, Northbrook, IL 
60065-4224. 

Commodore Owners of Massena (C.O.M.A0 has a new address: 7 
Water St., Massena, NY 13662. 

The Downriver Commodore Group has changed its address to P.O. 
Box 1277, Southgate, MI 48195. 

Central Dakota Commodore Club can be reached at Rt. 3, Captain 

Leach Dr. #18, Mandan, ND 58554, 

The Commodore Technical User Group (CTUG) has a new mailing 
address: P.O. Box 8342, Orange CA 92664. Newsletters can still be 
sent to S}/niax Error, P.O. Box 8051, Orange, CA 92664. 

The new address for Olympic Peninsula Users' Group is P.O. Box 

1894, Port Angeles, WA 98362. 

The Manitoba Users Group (M.U.G.) has changed its address to Box 
8, Group 351, R.R. 3, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, R3C 2E7. 

Toronto Pet User's Group (TPUG Inc.) has moved and consolidated 
its addresses to P.O. Box 724, Station B, Willowdale, Ontario, Canada 
M2K 2R1. 



New Listings 



.ALABAMA 



Commodoie Mobile Users Gioup (CMUO, 3993 
Cottage Hill Rd., #7B, Mobile, AL 36609 



CAIIKORMA 



HI Desert Commodore Users Group, 62026 
Sunburst Cr., Joshua Tree, CA 92252 



MASSACElUSI-TrS 



World Wide User* Group (or the C-64, P.O. Box 
50 C-P, H.ithorrc, MA 01937 



MINNI'SOI'A 



Hibbing Area Commodpre Klub (H. A.C.K.K 1 220 
E. 14th Ave., Hibbine, MN 55746 



NriSSOUKl 



Commodore North Users Group, P.O. Box 34534, 
North Kansas City, MO 64116 

62 COMPUTBS Qawtta January 1987 



N\\\' If KSl Y 



Hilltdale Cammodore 64 Utera Club, 32 
Esplanade Uke Dr., Hillsdale, N] 07642 



\TW YORK 



Ridge C-64 Users Group, 94 Ridge Rd,, Ridge, NY 

11961 
M alone Commodore User Group (MALCUGI, 27 

Uentley Ave., Malonc, NY 129S3 
Triple Cleles Commodoie Club, 1713 Castle 

Gardens Rd., Vestal. NY 13850 



CANOCUG, 1014 eth St. NE, Canton, OH 44704 



onrcoN 



American User Group, 33754 SE Oak St., 
Scapoose, OR 97056 



['I \NSYI\V.\IA 



Fuckihoe Users Group, 140 N, Rockbum St., 

York, FA 17402 
Southampton Commodoie Users Group, P.O. 

Box 3, Norristown, PA 19403 



SOL IH DAKOTA 



Abeideen Commodoie Computer Club, 115 
Church Dr.. Aberdeen, SD 57401 

Outside The U.S. 



c A.\A1)A 



Commodore Computer Users Association 

(NSCCU). P.O. Box 3426, Halifax, Nova Scotia 
B3I 3J1 
Canadian Commodoie Software & Hardware 
Useis Croup (CCS&HUG). P.O. Box 644, 
Bobcayecon. Ontario, KOM lAO 



ml:xk{) 



Club Commodoie de Juaiez, Catle del Manantlal 
M1448, Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico 
32500 

GMS Users Group, Potrero del Llano #112, 
Salamanca, GTO, Mexico 36730 ■ 



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Integral 
Solutions 



Battlefront 



Battlefronl ts a simulation for the Com- 
modore 64 of four of the most crucial 
battles of World War 11. The fourth 
strategy game from Australia's Strategic 
Studies Group (SSG), Battlefnmt contin- 
ues the menu -oriented design philoso- 
phy used by SSG in Carriers at War and 
Europe Ablaze. Roger Keating and Ian 
Trout, the game's designers, believe that 
the mechanics of strategy games should 
be simple, contained within a series of 
easily accessed menus. 

Ever since introducing their menu 
system in Corners at War, SSG has con- 
tinued to develop it. The menus in Eu- 
rope Ablaze were a little easier to work 
with, and those in Battkfrout are easier 
still. What the menus do, in all three 
games, is restrict the amount of infor- 
mation to which you have access, with 
the result of greater "fog-of-war" real- 
ism. They also aid your ability to make 
decisions, and prevent you from mak- 
ing an illegal move. 

In Baltlcfrout, information access is 
particularly important, since you are 
taking the part of the corps commander. 
In fact, you have absolutely no control 
over what your troops will do once 
you've given them their orders. UnUke 
many war games, Battlefront does not 
allow you to position individual units 
(except your headquarters), nor can you 
treat the units as anything but a unit. 
Many war games reward the command- 
er who keeps his units together, but Bat- 
tlefront is the first I've seen that doesn't 
allow you to do othervtise. You are the 
corps commander — nothing else. 

If this makes Battlefwui sound rig- 
id and mechanical, it shouldn't. The 
game is anything but that. Battlefront 
presents you with a strict point of view, 
but within that point of view you have a 
great deal to do. As corps commander, 
you must fulfill a set of objectives over 
which you have no control, and you 
must do it by trusting your subordi- 
nates to carry out your orders. In other 
words, the game defines very well your 
role within the military hierarchy. 

To get an idea of how the menus 
work, let's examine a typical advance- 
to -con tact situation. After a series of 
preliminary menus which allow you to 
examine your objectives, your position, 
and the status of your units, the Divi- 

64 COMPUTErs Gazette January 1987 



sion Select menu appears. Here you 
choose which division you want to give 
orders to. Once you've chosen, the Di- 
vision Order menu pops up, and this 
one has four choices. REGIMENT OR- 
DER lets you select the regiment (with- 
in that division) you will be 
commanding. If you choose SUPPORT 
you can allocate aircraft support points 
to that regiment. You have only a cer- 
tain number of air points to work with, 
so you must decide how many each 
regiment will receive. DIVISION AS- 
SETS allows you to assign unattached 
battalions to specific regiments. Finally, 
with MOVE HQ you can place your 
headquarters in a specific location. Sup- 
ply and leadership flow through the 
HQ, so its placement is critical. 

Most menus lead to further menus. 
The REGIMENT ORDER menu, for in- 
stance, brings up a menu allowing you 
to select which regiment you will give 
orders to. Once you've chosen, the Reg- 
iment Action menu appears, with four 
possibilities; ENGAGED, CONTACT, 
READY, and OB. OB (Order of Battle) is 
for checking the status of each battalion 
within the regiment, and is only an 
information menu. When you choose 
READY, another menu appears. Here 
you can place the regiment in RE- 
SERVE, command it to move towards 
an OBJECTIVE, order it to head for and 
engage the nearest ENEMY BATTAL- 
ION, or DEPLOY into better formation. 
Most of these, of course, lead to a fur- 
ther menu. 

If you choose CONTACT instead 
of READY, the Contact Action menu 
appears. Here the choices are RE- 
SERVE, DEFEND, SUPPORT, or 
PROBE. RESERVE places the regiment 
in waiting status, while DEFEND com- 
mands the regiment to find the best de- 
fensive terrain and formations. A 
regiment ordered to SUPPORT has its 
battalions coming to the support of a 
battalion under attack. PROBE 
launches a limited attack at the enemy. 

Choosing ENGAGED activates the 
Engaged Action menu, from which you 
select RESERVE, DEFEND, DELAY, or 
ATTACK, The first two are the same as 
above. DELAY orders the regiment to 
pull back towards the headquarters 
unit, and is used when an orderly re- 
treat is called for. ATTACK brings up 
the Attack Action menu, which allows 



the regiment to PROBE the enemy posi- 
tion, PREPARE for a later assault, AS- 
SAULT the position, or EXPLOIT in an 
attempt to move through the position. 

The game allows almost no chance 
of issuing an unwanted order. First, 
each menu has a default command that 
most benefits the unit, in case you sim- 
ply forget about it. Second, you cannot 
access all the menus if your troops are 
not in position for a particular order. Fi- 
nally, you can return to any menu, at 
any point during the turn, and change 
your mind. The only exception to this is 
the very first screen, which shows the 
command RUN 5. Once this is selected, 
the turn is in progress, and the orders 
cannot be changed. But even RUN 5 is 
accessible only once you've done some- 
thing in the turn, so choosing it by acci- 
dent is nearly impossible. 

The four scenarios re-create four 
critical battles of the war: Crete (1941), 
Stalingrad (1942), Saipan (1944), and 
Bastogne (1944), Each is playable in at 
most two evenings (usually less), and 
you can play either the Axis or the Al- 
lied commander. Once you play out the 
strategic options of these scenarios, you 
can create your own. Like all SSG 
games, Battlefront contains a scenario 
construction program that allows you 
to design a scenario from scratch. If you 
want someone to do your research and 
design for you, SSG's magazine. Run 5, 
publishes full scenarios, along with 
commentary on the games and on the 
history behind them. 

If there is a problem with Battle- 
front, it's with the amount of work the 
computer must handle. In several of the 
games I've played, regiments get mixed 
and jumbled almost of their own free 
will, and at times orders seem simply 
ignored. Perhaps this is a problem with 
the philosophy of the game itself: So 
much Is left to the computer that, unless 
the computer portion of the game does 
its job extremely well, the player stands 
to be frustrated. For example, I expect 
my computer subordinates to keep the 
regiments together better than 1 can; 
that's their job. And I don't expect, as 
has happened, my headquarters unit to 
follow its march orders right into an en- 
emy armored battalion. Experienced 
players have enough to do simply get- 
ting around their lack of total control. 
They do not need the frustration of hav- 




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Ing the computer do things incorrectly. 
Whenever I examine a computer 
war game, I ask two main questions: 
Will an experienced war gamer like it?; 
and Will a beginner be able to play it? 
Often, one yes precludes the other, be- 
cause experienced war gamers often en- 
joy a complexity that a beginner finds 
simply bewildering. In the case of Bat- 
tle front, however, I can suggest that 
both groups will like it equally well. 
The experienced gamer will appreciate 
the strategic options and realistic point 
of view, while the beginner will enjoy 
the menu-driven ease of play. In my 
opinion, Battlefront is the most enjoy- 
able SSG war game to date, and that's 
saying a great deal. 

—Neil Randall 

Strategic Studies Group 
Distributed by Electronic Arts 
1820 Gateway Dr. 
San Mateo, CA 94404 
$39.95 



Hacker II: The Doomsday Papers 



Since you have been recognized as the 
world's leading authority on computer se- 
curity systems, the Central Intelligence 
Agency wishes to enlist you in its efforts 
to combat international terrorism. 

Please press (RETURN) to indicate 
your acceptance of the assignment. Your 
full cooperation would be deeply appreci- 
ated. However, should you refuse or fail, 
the CM. will disavow any knowledge of 
your participation in this action. 
Sincerely, 

(Identity Classified) 
Director of Special Agents 
Washington, D.C. 

So begins your adventure into 
Hacker 11: The Doomsday Papers, Acti vi- 
sion's sequel to Hacker, last year's ad- 
venture hit. 1 found Hacker to be one of 
the most creative and unique games to 
come along for the 64, or for any other 
computer, for that matter. The concept 
of stumbling into an evil organization's 
computer network was intriguing, and 
saving the world from destruction, a 
challenge. The prograin was first-rate 
from start to finish. Hacker U: The 
Doomsday Papers not only delivers the 
same high quality of Hacker, but pre- 
sents the Hacker veteran with an even 
more difficult challenge than was faced 
in the original. 




BACKUP PROTECTED 
SOFTWARE FAST. 

From the team who brought you 
COPY II PLUS (Apple), Copy II PC 
(IBM) and COPY II MAC (Macin- 
tosh) comes a revolutionary new 
copy program for the Commodore 
64 and 128 computers. 

• Copies many protected 
programs— automatically. (We 
update Copy II 64/128 regularly to 
handle new protections; you as a 
registered owner may update at 
any time for $15 plus $3 s/h.) 

• Copies even protected disks in 
under 2 minutes {single drive), 

• Copies even protected disks In 
under 1 minute (tiual drive). 

• Maximum of four disk swaps on 
a single drive. 



• Includes fast loader, 12-second 
format. 

Requires a Commodore 64 or 128 
computer with one or two 1541 or 
1571 drives. 

Call 503/244-5782, M-F, 8-5 
(West Coast time) with your S 41 
in hand. Or send a check 
for $39.95 U.S. plus $3 s/h, $8 
overseas. 

$39.95 

Central Point Software, Inc. 
9700 S.W. Capitol Hwy. #100 
Portland, OR 97219 

CentmlFthit 
Sofhvam 



Backup utilities also emilabte for the IBM, Apple II, Macintosh and Atari ST. 

nispmduct 1$ piCNidadlor (fto purposo o^ enabling you to mske archival anpios only. 




As in Hacker, the game begins as 
though you are telecommunicating on 
your computer via modem. In Hacker II, 
you've signed on to a large information 
network when suddenly the message 
above breaks in on the transmission. 
From there you're told of a plot by a So- 
viet scientist and political strategist 'o 
overthrow the U.S. government. The 
"Doomsday Papers" documents his 
evil plan and is held in several vaults 
located in a secret Soviet military instal- 
lation hidden deep in Siberia. The 
C.I. A. has managed to plant three mo- 
bile remote units (the same little robots 
found in Hacker, where they were 
known as the subterranean remote 
units) inside the facility and have 
patched into the installation's video se- 
curity system. With the use of a "Multi- 
function Switching Matrix" (or MFSM) 
and the mobile remote units, you must 
make your way through the installation 
without being detected, and collect all 
the pieces of the document. 

The MFSM is basically a souped- 
up VCR with four monitor screens that 
can be controlled remotely by satellite. 
From the four screens on the MFSM, 
you can see what any of the installa- 
tion's numerous security cameras are 
viewing, tape what the cameras are see- 
ing, and play your tapes back. With the 
MFSM you can see where the guards 
are and where they are going, and you 
can guide your mobile remote units 
through the facility's halls. Spying 
through the security cameras' eyes, you 
can locate the vaults holding parts of 
the Doomsday Papers, and the MFSM 
allows you to communicate with and 
control the mobile remote units. 

Unlike Hacker, Hacker U does come 
with documentation. However, don't 
get your hopes up too high. The only 
documentation you're supplied with is 
a manual explaining the operation of 
the MFSM. The manual reminds mo of 
those great specification manuals that 
supposedly were for Star Trek's Enter- 
prise. It's written in a detailed fashion, 
as though the MFSM really existed and 
you were handling a real MFSM on 
your mission. This is a nice touch that 



66 COMPUT£rs Gazette January 1987 



Have y our 
Commodore^ 
look as smart 



as it works. 




Consolidate your 64, 64C and 128 system with the Command Center. 

Get your workspace back again. 

The Command Center will untangle your wires, 
unclutter your desk and put peripherals at your 
fingertips, Condensing your whole system into one 
compact unit, you might consider it the ultimate 
Commodore peripheral. You get Commodore value 
with the look of a more expensive system. 

Just look at all it includes: 

■ Built-in AC Power Strip with power surge and 
voltage spike protection, line noise filtering and 
power outlets. 

■ Built-in Drive/CPU Cooling Fan to prevent 
overheating. 

■ Modular Telephone Plug, with its own on- 
line/off-line telecommunications switch, (Option on 
64 and 64C). 

■ l\Aaster AC Switch for easy system power-up. 

■ Single or Dual Drive Configurations with the 
standard drive insert. 



Wilh the 

Command Center, 

your system is 

compact and 

complete, 




r 


■1 


■ 


■■■■jH 


1 


^^^^1'"''^ 








J/ ' ' Y^ 


Hhhhhmhhhhm^H 







Wiihoui the Command Center your Commodore 
peripherals look cluttered and take up most of your 
desk top. 



Many built-in conveniences add to the Command 
Center's value. 

«Commodn^e ;5 a registered Eradernar1< of Corr^modare EloctrDftits LU) 



'KETEK 

Free 30-day trial offer 

and one-year warranty. ^ !E 

For faster service, call 

1 -800-626-4582 toll-free 

1 -31 9-338-71 23 (Iowa Residents) 



KETEK P.O, B0X203 

Oakdale, lA 52319 
YES! Rush me a Command Center to 
complete my system, I may enjoy it for up 
to 30 days and return il (or a full refund. 

□ 64 $119,95 

□ 64C $129.95 

□ 125 $149.95 

(Please include $3.50 tor shipping and 
handling,) 



Namo 



AcJdress 



Cily 



Stato 



Z-|. 



Mncne Nunihor 



DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED 



helps propel you further into the spy 
fantasy. While indispensable, the man- 
ual doesn't outright tell you how to suc- 
cessfully perform your mission. Careful 
review of the manual and mastery of 
the MFSM's capabilities is the only way 
to enable you to plan a successful 
course for your mission. 

All the action is seen through the 
four screens of the MFSM. The graphics 
are good, with details that sometimes 
will surprise you. Guards move 
through the facility on their rounds, 
and you can witness the movement of 
your mobile remote units. Beware, 
however, for once your mobile remote 
units are detected by either the guards 
or the security cameras, the "annihila- 
tor" will be dispatched. The annihilator 
is an unrelenting mechanical monster, 
and once a mobile remote unit is cap- 
tured, the annihilator proceeds to turn 
the little robot into a pancake. 

Hacker U is a great buy and will 
supply you with hours of fun. While a 
joystick is needed to run the program. 
Hacker U is not an arcade game. Rather, 
it's a fairly involved strategy game that 
will take some time to master. It will 
challenge and entertain beyond your 
expectations. 

— Scott Thomas 

Activist on 

2350 Bayshore Frontage Rd. 

Mountain Vim. CA 94043 

$59.95 



COMPUTEI's Gazette is 
looking for utilities, 
games, applications 
educational programs, 
and tutorial articles. If 
you've created a pro- 
gram that you think other 
readers might enjoy or 
find useful, send it, on 
tape or disk to: 

Submissions Reviewer 
COMPUTE! Publications 
P.O. Box 5406 
Greensboro, NC 27403 

Please enclose an SASE if 
you wish to have the 
materials returned. 
Articles are reviewed 
within four weeks of 
submission. 



Gettysburg: The Turning Point 



Most historians agree that the turning 
point of the Civil War occurred on farm 
fields south of a sleepy little Pennsylva- 
nia town called Gettysburg near the 
Pennsylvania/Maryland border. Dur- 
ing three hot July days in 1863, the 
82,000-man Army of the Potomac, un- 
der General George Meade, met the 
75,000 troops of the Confederate army, 
commanded by General Robert E. Lee. 
After the battle, both sides had suffered 
horrible losses, and the Confederate 
army had begun a long retreat into Vir- 
ginia. Gettysburg: The Turning Point puts 
you in the position of Lee or Meade at 
this crucial point in U.S. history. 

I liked SSI's earlier Battle of Antie- 
tam, another excellent Civil War simu- 
lation (see the June 1986 issue), but 
Getti/sburg: The Turning Point is even 
better. 

As with most of SSI's simulations, 
you may choose to play against a hu- 
man opponent or face your computer as 
adversary. And you may select to com- 
mand the Union forces or replace Gen- 
eral Lee. The multiple choices available 
in setting up the game from an easy-to- 
follow menu screen allow tailoring the 
game as you prefer. Set the variable fac- 
tors any way you like, favoring one side 
or the other, or play a historically accu- 
rate simulation. 

The Battle of Gettysburg lasted for 
three days. Playing the Campaign 
Game portion of this simulation may 
take you even longer. One complete 
game we played lasted nearly 60 hours. 
SSI says that the campaign game can 
take more than 40 hours. Playing out 
the shorter scenarios, one day in the 
battle takes more than eight hours. 
Don't expect to spend a couple of hours 
in the evening with this one; set aside 
an entire weekend. Fortunately, you do 
have the option of saving the game 
after each combat phase. 

You can play scenarios based on 
the first, second, or third day of the bat- 
tle. As each scenario begins, the oppos- 
ing forces are in their historical 
positions. Will you order General 
George Pickett to attack Cemetery 
Ridge, the center of the Union line, with 
barely 15,000 troops? Maybe attacking 
the flank of the Union forces would be a 
better move. Would you like to try 
some other strategy in an attempt to 
press to a victory? Here's a chance to 
test your skill as a military tactician. 

You'll find the game interaction to 
be very realistic. Order your units of 
artillery, cavalry, and infantry into po- 
sition. Units can and often will run out 
of ammunition. Supplies are late in ar- 
riving. Press your men too hard and fa- 
tigue becomes a factor. And the 
casualty list continues to grow. You'll 



have to deal vdth many of the same 
problems that the famous generals en- 
countered. Can you give the order to 
hold a position, knowing that the cost 
will be many lives? 

If you've played SSI's Battle of An- 
tietam, you'll find the game play of Get- 
tysburg quite similar. Several small 
changes have been made in this new 
game, but the changes greatly enhance 
the playability of the simulation and are 
not very apparent; you have to look for 
them. 

Players new to strategy war games 
will enjoy the ease of play at the begin- 
ner's level. All units are shown as icons, 
graphic representations of the forces on 
the board, and the decisions necessary 
to play aren't overwhelming. 

As your skill increases, you can 
move on to the intermediate and ad- 
vanced games, which offer maximum 
control of the forces involved. At these 
levels of complexity, it's usually best to 
switch from icons to the traditional war 
game symbols. You'll be controlling ev- 
ery aspect of your forces, and assume a 
greater degree of responsibility for their 
fate. 

Most importantly, Gettysburg isn't 
a mindless "shoot 'em up." Hasty ac- 
tions here can be costly. Attacking may 
not always be the best strategy. Some- 
times it's best to hold your fire and con- 
serve ammunition. As you learn the 
game, you'll probably feel the desire to 
learn more about the Battle of Gettys- 
burg, it would be interesting to play out 
the historical battle, step by step, with 
just a few minor changes. Would the re- 
sults be different? 

A trip to your local library or book- 
store to pick up a history book about 
the battle is definitely in order. Here's a 
chance for a parent or teacher to help 
bring an important part of American 
history to life for a student. 

You're sure to enjoy many hours 
with Gettysburg: The Turning Point — it's 
a must for every war gamer's software 
library. 

— George Miller 

SS! 

1046 N. Rengstorff Ave. 

Mountain View, Ca. 94043 

$53.95 



SB COMPUTEI's Gazette January 1937 



NUMBER ONE ARCADE HITS 






.-vv- 



A 








FOR YOUR COMPUTER. \ 

i 1 V i V 









^'v 



M ASTER 



p- 



^flTH 







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42»*\' 



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b^ 




Pui on your brack belt and challengeyour 
ff lends or the computer through nine 
plctureique settlngx In this leading Martial 
ArU Game to become the KARATE 
CHAMP. For the Commodore 64'"/12fl 
and the 48K Apple 11* Series. 



/\s the crack shot COMMANDO,* battle 

overwhelming oddSt to defeat advancing 
rebel forces. Armed with only a machine 
gun and hand grenades, you mujt break 
through the enemy lines to reach the fort- 
ress. For the Commodore M"/l Z8. 



Prepare for the fight of your life . . . you 
are the KUNG-FU MASTER.' * Battle the 
evil forces through the five dangerous 
floors In the wizard's castJe to rescue the 
captive fair maiden. For the Commodore 
64'7t2a and the 48K Apple H" Serlra. 



Applr and Commodof e 64 itie triKJrmvtFks of Apple Cont- 

puwr. (nq. and Conmradore EIrttfonlci, Lid. f«p»cilvery. 

• c Oi(a Ent USA. Inc. Mid. und« tinnw from Cflptmn 

USA. 

■ • I l«m Cmp. Mia. umltt Ikcmt try Data East USA. Irx. 



DATA 



DATA EAST USA, INC. 

470 Needles Drive, San Jose, California 951 12 



.(40a[ 286-7074 
c 1 786 Data East USA, Inc. All rights reserved. 



Superscript 128 

As with its kissing cousin Superbase 128 
(reviewed in the November issue), Su- 
perscript 128 packs more power than 
most of us will ever need. On the other 
hand, many of us would rather drive a 
400-cubic-inch V-8 than a little four- 
cylinder economy car, even if we never 
went farther from home than the comer 
market. So it is with Superscript 128: 
Use it for notes and memos as you will; 
when you're ready to write a five- 
pound romance novel or do a mass 
mailing to the Tom Ctoaise fan clubs, 
Superscript will fairly roar with power. 

In using Superscript for the first 
time, you'll be pleased to note that the 
disk boots automatically (from the 1571 
drive) and that the display is an 80- 
column green-on-black. You're 
prompted to make a working disk, and 
although subsequent uses still require 
you to boot with the master disk, this 
procedure lessens the likelihood of irre- 
versible damage. 

The first menu allows you to select 
from a list of compatible printers. This 
information is written to the working 
disk and displayed each time you boot 
up, providing for an automatic con- 
figuration. 

Once you've done this, you're pre- 
sented with a screen that's 80 columns 
by 22 lines of work space. The top two 
lines are for menus reminiscent of those 
found in Lotus 1-2-3: As you move the 
cursor to highlight options, a brief de- 
scription of that option appears on the 
line below; select one and the line 
changes to show sub-options, each 
with its own description. 

Although this is designed to help 
newer users to get the feel of the fea- 
tures, the menu system is as slow as any 
process you've ever seen — leaving you 
to wonder if you should have opted for 
a hammer, chisel, and a flat stone. As 
an example, the usually simple act of 
creating a heading requires that you 
meander through four menus before 
you're able to type the heading. But you 
still have margins and spacing to set — 
and to do this you must backtrack to the 
proper root menu and take the proper 
fork to arrive at the place where you can 
set margins. 

Fortunately, a good number of the 
many options likely to be used during 
the writing process are accessible 
through Control Commands that utilize 
the Control key and a letter key. These 
allow such routines as appending a 
block of text, deleting words, turning In- 
sert on or off, and going to beginning or 
end of text, as well as all the other cursor 
movements that involve moving more 
than a space at a time, life will be easier 
and your enjoyment of Superscript 128 
greater if you leam these commands 



quickly. To help you, the documentation 
includes a quick-reference page that 
shows not only the Control Commands 
but also the tree structure of menus and 
submenus. In addition, the disk con- 
tains numerous help screens. Things 
may slow down, but you won't get lost. 

When you format a document from 
the menus, as described above, the re- 
sult of your menu journey is that the 
program produces a "dot command" 
and enters it in the proper place on the 
work screen. You can speed up this pro- 
cess by writing your own dot commands 
such as ".ImlO ,rmlO .tm6 ,bm6 " — this 
example giving you left and right mar- 
gins of ten spaces each and top and bot- 
tom margins of six lines each. 

The document preview function 
will allow you to view your work at any 
time, with dot commands and para- 
graph markers removed, showing it ex- 
actly as it will appear on printout. 

As with most good word proces- 
sors. Superscript supports a variety of 
type styles for adding emphasis or cre- 
ating headings. (How well these work 
for you will depend upon the printer 
you're using.) Among these are under- 
lining, boldface, shadow, superscript, 
and subscript. Although they will not 
appear that way in your preview, em- 
phasized words will be highlighted. 

For those letters to members of the 
Tom Cruise Fan Club, Superscript 128 
allows a mail-merge function in which 
you create one letter (with markers) for 
everyone. The markers designate 
spaces where you wish information 
stored with Superbase to be inserted. 
This can be as simple as inserting a 
name and address at the top of each let- 
ter, or as finely tuned as referring to the 
recipient by name or title in the body of 
the letter (providing of course that the 
title is a part of the information stored 
in your Superbase records). 

As well as supporting these vari- 
able markers, Superscript also allows for 
the use of "conditional variables," 
which simply means that if there is no 
information available for that slot (no 
title, for instance) the text will close up 
and not leave an embarrassing blank. 

For addressing the envelopes. Su- 
perscript contains a labels document. 
Though small, this is a merge document 
which performs just as your letter did, 
pulling names and addresses out of 
your Superbase file and printing them in 
the form of mailing labels. 

If you find you must sometimes 
present figures in your work. Super- 
script allows the use of numeric tabs 
that will keep your columns in proper 
alignment and also will perform addi- 
tion of the numbers entered. 

With all this power going for it, 
you may find that the spell-check fea- 
ture is a bit different from others you 



may have encountered. To begin with, 
the flip side of the master disk contains 
two dictionaries, one British and one 
American (Superscript is a British im- 
port). So if you insist on spelling it col- 
our instead of color, you're covered. 
Each dictionary is then divided into two 
parts, the Master and the User, New 
words added by you should go only to 
the user dictionary. 

When invoked, the checker first 
lists the number of words in your docu- 
ment and the number of unique words, 
then prompts you to insert your copy of 
the dictionary disk. Here's where things 
get a bit strange: Words not spelled cor- 
rectly are highlighted, and a menu bar 
gives you options of Accept, IHdit, 
Learn, Ignore, and Quit. Accept allows 
temporary {throughout the document) 
use of the word, while Leam adds it to 
the user dictionary and Ignore passes 
over it until the next occurrence. 

Edit does nothing more than allow 
you to correct the spelling by hand. It 
does not present a list of possible spell- 
ings, so if you're dealing with some- 
thing more than a typo you're going to 
have to find a dictionary and look it up. 
There is a certain amount of frustration 
here: You know that it knows the cor- 
rect spelling — how else could it know 
you were wrong? — but it isn't telling. 

You may, however, jump out of 
the spell-check mode, return to the 
main menu, go through two more selec- 
tions, and arrive at Search. Here, you 
type in the word (it can be shortened, 
using * as a wildcard) and the program 
will search the dictionary for a match. 
Then return to Edit mode and type it in. 

My regrets about the complexity of 
the menus, and the intransigence of the 
spell- checker aside. Superscript 128 still 
comes through as a powerful and full- 
featured word processor, with docu- 
mentation geared toward the beginner 
and step-by-step guidance through the 
creation of documents as well as the use 
of math and mail-merge features, 

— Ervin Bobo 

Progressive Peripherals & Software 

464 Kalamuth St. 

Denver, CO 80204 

$79.95 • 



70 COMPUTEVs Gazette January 1987 



i 



FROM AMERICA'S NOl SOFTWARE HOUSE 




^ 



AMERICAS NOl 
BILLBOARD MAGAZINE 



ELITE 



Command your Cobra space ship in a 
fantastic voyage of discovery and 
adventure, a supreme test of your 
combat, navigational and 
entrepeneurial skills. 

Trade between countless planets, using the proceeds 
to equip your ship with heat- seeking missiles, beam 
lasers and other weapons - corporate states can be 
approached without risk, but unruly anarchies 
may be swarming with space pirates 

Black market trading can be lucrative but 
could result in skirmishes with local police 
and a price on your head! 

However you make your money, by fair 
means or foul, you must blast onwards 
through space annihilating pirate ships 
and hostile aliens as you strive to earn 
your reputation - 

as one of the Elite! 




A RARE SPECIES OF INTERACTIVE 
ILLUSTRATED FICTION FOR THE 
COMMODORE 64™/ 128™ AMIGA!" 
AND ATARI 520ST™ 

This illustrated adventure is destined to rival all 
the classics. Stunning graphics are the icing on 
the cake— but underne.jth lies the most advanced 
text operating system yet developed. The story is 
absorbing, humorous, lively, full of intrigue and 
puzzle, 'The Pawn" and further adventures will be 
available for all leading personal computers. 
Guaranteed to make a major impact on the market. 






COHU^DOJU AUmA- 



^LJ! 




COfclMODOBE 64/128 AND COMMODORE AMIGft ARE TBADEMARKS OF 

COMMODOHE BUSINESS MACHINES 

ATABI S20ST IS A TRADEMARK OF THE ATARI CORPORATION 




COMPUTE! Books' 

COMMODORE 




COLLE 




COMPUTtt't 



FIRST p 

BOOK! 



These outstanding books for the Commodore 128 in 128 
mode contain something for every 1 28 user — programming 
guides, memory maps, games, applications, and tutorials. 
And all programs take full advantage of the 1 28's power: 
Each Is used in 128 mode. All the listings are carefully tested, 
and the Information is dependable and current, Plus, each 
book is written in COMPUTEI's popular, eosy-to-understond 
styte to offer you hours of entertainment, education, and 
challenge. 



Look for these titles at your local computer of book store, 
or order directly from COMPUTE! Books. 

To order, call toll-free 1-800-346-6767 (in NY 212-887-8525). or 
writ© COMPUTE! Books. P.O. Box 5038, F.D.R. Station. New York. 
NY 10150. 



COMPUTEI'S 128 Programmer's 

Guide 

Editors of COMPUTEl 

$16.95 

ISBN 0-87455-031-9 AMpaaoi 

The complete guide to the Commodore 
1 28, this book thoroughly explores BASIC 
7.0; shows you how to create graphics, 
music, ond program peripherals; and in- 
troduces you to machine language 
programming. A clear yet exhaustive 
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Richard Mansfield 
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MM§ 







A Simple Magic 



Richard Mansfield 
Senior Editor 

You've seen them: mysterious lists 
of numbers in DATA statements 
within a BASIC program which are 
simply POKEd into memory. Final- 
ly, the program SYS's to the first 
number. And magic happens. 
It looks like this: 

10 FOR I - 49152 TO 49163 

20 READ BYTE 

30 POKE I,BYTE 

40 NEXT I 

SO DATA 150,0,185,0,4,153,0,5,136,208, 

247,96 
60 SYS 49152 

Try typing this in and running 
it (128 owners should use 64 mode). 

The general structure of these 
strange BASIC programs is always 
the same. There's that loop which 
reads in the data and POKEs it. 
There's the SYS. Sometimes the 
SYS has a different address and, al- 
ways, the DATA numbers are dif- 
ferent, but this structure can be 
found in many BASIC programs. 

The DATA numbers are a small 
machine language (ML) program. 
Unlike BASIC, ML isn't made up of 
words which are interpreted for the 
computer. It is, rather, comprised of 
numbers which the computer un- 
derstands directly. 

Slapping The Screen 

Some of the numbers above repre- 
sent actions for the computer to 
take: 165 means to load the follow- 
ing byte (the 0) into the Y register. 
And the 96 at the end instructs the 
computer to leave its native ma- 
chine mode and return the familiar 
BASIC environment, A 96 is like a 
RETURN command in BASIC, 

If you run this program, you'll 
see that it grabs the first 256 charac- 
ters on your screen and slaps them 
down six lines lower. It happens in- 
stantly because ML runs so very 
fast. Any delay you notice is caused 
by BASIC trying to READ and 

74 CQMPUTEI's Gazette Janjary 1987 



POKE prior to the SYS (where the 
machine language takes over con- 
trol of the computer). But if you 
then write or list something on- 
screen and directly SYS, you'll see 
the true speed. 

How did the programmer 
know that these numbers, strung 
together in this particular order, 
would result in the little memory 
move that we can watch onscreen? 
(A similar routine is used in com- 
mercial software to move help 
screens from memory into screen 
RAM.) To write ML, do you need to 
memorize that 96 means RETURN? 

Fortunately, no. ML is some- 
times called assembly language be- 
cause it's written using an 
assembler, We published an assem- 
bler in the October issue, and there 
are several available from software 
companies. With an assembler, you 
write instructions much the same 
way as you would write a BASIC 
program. The instructions are dif- 
ferent, though. Each is three letters 
long and is an abbreviation, RTS, 
for example, means ReTum from 
Subroutine and is used just like 
BASIC'S RETURN command. So, 
using an assembler, you would type 
RTS to end an ML program, and the 
assembler would look up the mean- 
ing of RTS and insert a 96 to replace 
the word RTS. 

It works this same way with all 
56 of the ML commands. Here is 
what you would type into an as- 
sembler to create the example pro- 
gram above: 

10*= 491S2 

20 .O 

30 LDY #0 

40 LOOP LDA 1024,Y 

50 STA 1280, Y: DEY 

60 BNE LOOP 

70 RTS 

As you can see, some assem- 
blers allow you to enter ML as if it 
were a BASIC program. You can 
use the excellent, built-in Commo- 
dore screen editor, line numbers. 



colons between commands, and 
even any utilities you would nor- 
mally use in BASIC, such as auto- 
matic line renumbering. Some 
assemblers, unfortunately, require 
that you use their special editor, 
which not only means you need to 
leam a whole new set of word pro- 
cessing commands, but also forces 
you to abandon all the utilities you 
like to use when developing a 
program. 

A BASIC Example 

So, ultimately, ML is a matter of 
learning the ML set of commands 
and the special features of assem- 
bling. For example, the first line of 
every ML program must specify 
where in memory you wish the re- 
sulting ML program stored. That 
*= symbol in line 10 accomplishes 
this for you. Then, the ,0 tells the 
assembler to actually store the ML 
program in RAM memory (it's op- 
tional; you could, for example, store 
to disk instead if you wanted your 
final program to reside where 
BASIC programs normally sit). 

Then, the program proper. No- 
tice the label LOOP in lines 40 and 
60. The better assemblers allow you 
to define locations within a pro- 
gram with ordinary words. You can 
then, in line 60, BNE (Branch if Not 
Equal to zero) back to the location 
of LOOP, By the way, the com- 
mand preceding the BNE is the one 
which determines whether you go 
back to LOOP or continue on down 
the program. The DEY lowers the Y 
register by one each time through 
the loop. Finally, Y will hit zero, the 
branching will no longer take place, 
and the computer will RTS to end 
the program. 

This program, though small, il- 
lustrates most of the elements of 
ML programming: loading and stor- 
ing registers, looping, branching, 
and incrementing/decrementing. 
ML uses three general-purpose 
variables, called registers: the X, Y, 



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and A registers. The A register is 
used most often to fetch and store 
bytes; X and Y are often used as 
counters to determine how often 
something happens in a loop or to 
index where something is being ac- 
cessed in memory. In our example 
program, the Y register is set to zero 
(LDY #0) and then is used both to 
count down through the loop 
(DEY) as well as point to positions 
on screen RAM (LDA 1024,Y and 
STA 1280,Y). With these last two 
commands, we are involving both 
the A and Y registers. LDA 1024 
means LoaD the A register with 
whatever byte (or screen character, 
in this case) is located at address 
1024. But, by adding the ,Y to this 
command, we are telling the com- 
puter to load the byte at 1024 plus 
the current value in the Y register. 
Thus, we can quickly cycle through 
256 characters because we DEY 
each time through the loop. 

For a fuller understanding of 
the meaning of this ML program, 
here's how it would look translated 
into BASIC, line for line: 

10 START = 49152 

20 REM NO EQUIVALENT, BASIC 
ALWAYS STORES ITS PROGRAMS 
INTO RAM 

30 Y - 

40 A - PEEK 1024 + Y:REM PLACE- 
NAMES LIKE LOOP NOT ALLOWED 
IN BASIC 

50 POKE 1290 + Y, A: Y = Y - 1 

60 IF Y < -2SS THEN Y = Oi GOTO 40 

70 RETURN 

Of course, we've followed the 
ML structure here. You'd construct 
a BASIC program differently, using 
BASIC'S looping construction with 
FOR/ NEXT. But it's worth whilu 
comparing the ML and BASIC ver- 
sions to get a feel for the way ML 
handles variables, loops, and 
branches — the fundamental tools 
of computing, no matter what lan- 
guage is involved. 

By the way, the reason ML can 
check for a zero after 256 DEY's is 
that when you decrement an indi- 
vidual byte, it continues counting 
down until it reaches zero, then it 
resets to 255 and counts down again. 
So, after we first stored that zero 
into the Y register, it hit a DEY and 
turned into the number 255, which, 
when tested by the BNE, was not yet 
zero. We continue the loop until, 
after 256 times through, Y finally 
contains a zero and we're done, a 



76 COMPUTEn Gazette Januajy 1987 



STVV-t 



COPWH< 



niSKS 



NOiOOV 



tlSECAN- 












95 ca. 



*ecVion ! 



2 Drive 



Maptof 



vo\umes 













"&U smiiic.%ur 

opponent winces.- 
i"VbubowSo 
does he. 
r> The 
World 
Karate 
Cham- 
pionship' begins. 
Slowly ever 
sosIowl>jyou 
approach. He 
flinches, and you make a combi- 
nation front punch and kick. 
"Vbu spin, then do a 



Practire hnj^enausfi and ytmrfin^rr/ 
K'iU be trgiikrcd as IcHih! avapvny 



toriico 
■ff^--.- \Tpteit&com 

CS4n2H.iBSi& 



M 

reverse kick. ^^** '^ 

A forwai"d flip. 
%u kick again, only- 
higher. Bang. It con- 
nects. Li^ts out. 
This time, you 
survived in 
one piece. f 
"feu'll have 17 intri- 
cate moves to master. , 
As you progress, / 
you'll fight your way 
from white to black' 
belt in 8 deadly; international 
settings. With a final. 




championship 
match at the base of Mt. Fuji. 
See you at the Dojo. 



^MASH SOMEONE'S FACE IN THE 
OMFORTOFVOUR OWN HOME. 



\ It's the Sultans of 
Slam. The 
Gurus of 
Gashes. 
The 

meanest, 
nastiest 




a few ihaiaTTTil 




- , These animals u 

rowdies to !om^«.Ana 
ever hit the canvas. 
Ladies and not- 
so- Gentlemen, 
we proudly 
present the 
vile, irre- 
putable 
stars 



of Championship 
Wrestling:' 

There are 8 of 
these creeps in all, 
each with their 
own disgusting 
personalities and 
revolting habits. 
Throw them from the ring. 
Crush their heads. Slam them 
to the mat. Pulverize their 
puny bones. You'll have over 
25 moves to pin your man. 
You'll need over 250 stitches 
if you don't. 

And one day after your 
poor battered head resem- 
bles an over-cooked cabbage, 
you'll be good enough to win 
the title. And the Champion- 
ship Wrestling Belt wiU be 
yours. "^ 



Ow to eight piavfn. 
Aps^ll&comptlihhi. 
Atari ST, CS4/I2H 




Video Setup 

Part 2 

Jim Butterfield, Associate Editor 



Last month, we looked at a program that provides Commodore 
64 users with all the information needed to set up custom 
graphics screens. In this installment, we examine the Commo- 
dore 128 version. 



When you want to create a special 
video screen, the arithmetic can get 
difficult, and there are pitfalls that 
may be hard to see. "Video Setup 
128" helps you with the necessary 
calculations. 

In the case of the 128, there's 
both good news and bad news. The 
machine is very helpful with some 
things, but it hinders you on others. 

Here's the good news: You can 
put video almost anywhere in the 
128. Whether you want standard 
characters, custom characters, or 
high-resolution graphics, you may 
select either RAM bank {0 or 1) and 
any 16K block within the bank for 
video. If you want a split screen, 
you can get it just by asking for it. 

Here's the bad news (but it's 
not that bad): The standard printing 
and graphics commands all assume 
that the VIC video memory area 
will be in bank 0, at addresses 
0-16383. If you want to use any 
other block, you'll need to rely on 
POKES to get data to the screen. 
Depending on your objecrives, that 
may be no problem. 

The regular 128 screen may be 
good enough for many applica- 
tions. But if you want to buUd your 
own character set or do some hi-res 
work, you might need a custom 
screen or two. 

Video Setup 128 won't do all 

78 COMPUTE'S Gazette January 1987 



the work for you, of course. Charac- 
ter-set or sprite construction is up to 
you; the program just shows you 
how to allocate the areas con- 
cerned. If you want a split screen, 
the program does quite a lot for 
you, making sure the various areas 
don't conflict. For other uses of dual 
screens, however, you'll need to run 
Video Setup 128 twice, once for 
each screen. You'll then have two 
sets of POKEs to switch in each 
screen. 

Running the Program 

Before we start experimenting, type 
in and save a copy of Video Setup 
128. Then load it and type RUN. 
You're first asked about the type of 
screen you'd like to set up. Do you 
want a split screen or not? If you opt 
for a split-screen setup, you'll be 
asked in two sections about each of 
the screens. If you respond that you 
don't want a split screen, you'll be 
asked to select whether you want 
text or a hi-res screen. In this case, 
the program asks for information 
on the option you have selected. 

All the data for your custom 
screen— screen memory, character 
set, and sprites — must reside with- 
in a single 16K block of a specific 
bank of RAM memory. You may 
opt for the standard character set in 
any block, in which case you'll later 



be given the POKE to bring the 
character ROM into the viewing 
area of the video chip. If you don't 
want standard characters, you'll 
eventually be given the POKE to 
make this ROM invisible to video 
so that it doesn't clutter up the 
available memory space. 

If you're creating a text screen 
and have decided on a custom char- 
acter set, you'll be asked to choose a 
site for it; this site is known as the 
character base. Keep in mind that 
the computer allocates enough space 
for 256 characters to be defined; if 
you don't need that many, you 
don't have to use the entire memo- 
ry area for characters. If you've 
specified that you want the regular 
character set, the computer knows 
where to find it and won't ask. 

If you're doing a hi-res screen, 
you'll be asked for the screen area. 
That, too, is the character base, but 
it's used in a different way. 

For a text screen, you'll be 
asked to pick a location for screen 
memory, more properly called the 
video matrix. You're offered safe ad- 
dresses — those not used by other 
video elements. In hi-res, you'll be 
asked for the color memory (once 
again — the video matrix). 

If you've chosen a spht-screen 
display, the program gives you an 
interim summary and then asks you 
for details on the other part of the 
split, followed by a second summa- 
ry. If the screen is not split, the 
computer gives you the whole story 
at once. Either way, you'll get a 
summary of the areas used, and the 



.-^ 





,- i 



VISIT EXOTIC LANDS 
WIN OVERTHE NATIVE! 



There is a place, 
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It is true. 

There is another 
rather bizarre land 
where grown men 
actually throw them- 
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a sign of athletic prowess. 

Right off the edge of a cliff. 

We're talking, of course, 
about Scotland's famous 
Caber Toss and the death- 
defying divers of Acapulco. 

Two of the events you'll find 
in World Games7 the newest 
sequel in our bestselling 
"Games" series. 

Here's your chance to dash 
around the globe as a big-time 
international athlete compet- 
ing in 8 extraordinary sports. 

Go stomach to stomach 
with a 400 pound sumo. Jump , 
barrels in 
Germany 




/iltiiiw hale hn){ilist(mceis 
t'ltiiili'/f It I tro 



ray II dress. 




Yiiii liairii'l lived Uillil you u' 
lakena Ingoutfiiraspin. 



Try Canada's 
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log roll. Or ski the 
brutal, wintry slopes 
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Then it's back to 
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bull. And off again to 
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If you manage 
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POKEs needed to create them. And 
you'll get a cautionary note telling 
you where BASIC (bank 0) or vari- 
ables {bank 1) normally reside so 
that you can avoid conflict. 

Sprite information is also sup- 
plied if you ask for it. 

A First Run-Through 

Let's look through the program and 
use it to set up something trivial — 
the 128's normal screen. At first, 
this may seem silly — we already 
have this screen. But if we work 
through the numbers, we'll get the 
POKEs that will help us to get back 
to this configuration whenever we 
wish. 

Enter responses as follows: No 
split screen; Option 1 (characters). 
We'll select bank and memory 
area (addresses 0-16383), and an- 
swer NO to custom character set. 
Finally, video matrix is 1 {screen 
memory is normally at 1024-2047), 

Now get out your pencil to 
make some notes, and you'll see; 

BANKO 

VIDEO MATRIX: 1024 TO 2047 

(SPRITE POINTERS AT 2040 TO 2047) 

POKE 54534,4 
POKE 56576,7 
POKE 2604,20 
POKE 216,0 
POKE 217,0 

The POKE commands are 
shown with comments on their 
purpose. 

After you've noted this data, 
press a key to continue, and then 
respond YES to the sprites ques- 
tion, and you'll see that there are 
three areas in which sprite draw- 
ings can be placed. 

Note the caution, which states 
that BASIC normally occupies 
memory that we might choose to 
use for sprites; in this case, there's 
no conflict with the video matrix. 
You could choose to relocate the 
BASIC work area; that would in- 
volve changing a pointer at ad- 
dresses 45 and 46 and typing NEW, 
but that's outside the scope of Vid- 
eo Setup, 

We don't need to perform any 
of these POKEs right now, since our 
128 is already set to these values. 
But we'll keep them handy. 

A Working Example 

Let's try for something fancy — a 
split screen in bank 1 of memory, 
Remember; PRINT and graphics 

80 COMPUTEI'a Gazette January 1967 



commands don't work in this area, 
so we'll need to use POKEs for any 
work we want to do. 

We'll choose area 1 in bank 1. 
Run Video Setup, and type these 
responses: YES to split screen, and 
bank 1, area 1, For the character 
screen, type NO to build a custom 
character set. Select video matrix 
(the text screen memory) at block 2 
(addresses 18432-19455). Note 
that we aren't offered blocks 4, 5, 6, 
and 7; that's where the character- 
generator ROM will be. 

Now comes the first part of our 
POKE sequence. We have: 

BANKl 

VIDEO MATRIX: 18432 TO 19455 

(SPRITE POINTERS AT 19448 TO 19455) 

POKE 54534,68 
POKE 56576,6 
POKE 2604,36 

Write these down, and note 
that they all differ from the stan- 
dard screen POKEs we performed 
earlier. Press any key to continue 
and enter NO to muUicolor. 

At this point, the computer rec- 
ognizes that there's only one place 
that the hi-res screen can fit in, so it 
doesn't ask you where to place it. 

The next quesdon is an eye- 
opener. You're given a choice of lo- 
cations for the color memory {video 
matrix). This time, we're offered 
blocks 4-7, which were not allowed 
to us before. How can this be? 

When a split screen is enabled, 
the character-generator ROM is 
switched in and out as required. It's 
there when we're wriring text; it's 
gone when we're drawing pictures, 
so we may use that part of memory 
for hi-res if we wish. 

Good. We'll prove it can be 
done by selecdng number 7. Now 
we can complete our list of POKE 
commands: 

BANKl 

VIDEO MATRIX: 23552 TO 24575 
(SPRITE POINTERS AT 24568 TO 24575> 
CHARACTER BASE; 24576 TO 32767 

POKE 2605,120 
POKE 216,96 
POKE 217,0 

These POKEs complete the set 
of commands. The last POKE 
shown — the one to 217 — is the 
same as that for the normal 128 
screen. We won't need to use it, 
since we're not changing anything 
in this case. 

If we ask for sprite infor- 
mation, we find that we can put 



sprite definitions in two areas. Then 
we are cautioned about the variable 
area, which normally runs from 
1024 to 65279. 

This last bit of information is 
important. We don't want variables 
to run over our screen areas. We 
should take steps to insure that this 
doesn't happen by changing the 
start-of-variables pointer (at ad- 
dresses 47 and 48), moving its con- 
tents up so that it points above the 
area we're using; or the end-of- 
variables pointer (at addresses 
57-58), moving it down until it's 
below the area we're using. 

In case something goes wrong, 
we'll build in a TRAP statement to 
bring the screen back: 
90 TRAP 300 

Now let's move to our new split 
screen: 

100 BANK 15 
110 POKE 54534,68 
120 POKE 56576,6 
130 POKE 2604,36 
140 POKE 2605,120 
150 POKE 216,96 

By this time, our screen will be 
switched. Now we'll POKE some- 
thing there so we can see it work- 
ing. We'll do characters, hi-res 
colors, and then hi-res detail: 

200 BANK 1 

210 FOR J -18432 TO 19455:POKE 

I,46:NEXT J 
220 FOR J -23552 TO 2457S:POKE 

J,1:NEXT J 
230 FOR 1 = 24576 TO 32767:POKE 

J,7:NEXT J 

And then we'll do them again 
to watch the change: 

240 FOR J -18432 TO 1945S;POKE 

J,24:NEXT J 
250 FOR J = 23552 TO 24575:POKE 

I,86:NEXT J 
260 FOR 1 = 24576 TO 32767:POKE 

J,96!NEXTJ 

And finally, we'll put every- 
thing back; 

300 BANK 15 
310 POKE 54534,4 
320 POKE 56576,7 
330 POKE 2604,20 
340 POKE 216,0 
350 TRAP 

Note that we didn't need a POKE 
2605 when we returned, since 
that's a graphic-mode POKE. 

Memory Tour 

Let's take a quick tour of 128 mem- 
ory to identify the areas that might 
be a bit tricky when you're doing 
video work. 



baa^°©Mi]l^& 



Modifications and Corrections 



•"Window Wizard" (September) 
works as listed, but there is one er- 
ror in thie article. On page 63, in the 
description of the IRESTORE com- 
mand, it is incorrectly stated that 
PEEK{37635) will tell you ivhich 
screen is currently being pointed to. 
The correct address for the PEEK is 
49155, not 37635. 

• As listed, "Directory Extension" 
(October) doesn't save file descrip- 
tions correctly. The problem is 
caused by a misspelled IF statement 
in line 530. Since BASIC ignores 
spaces, the misspelling causes 
BASIC to create a new array, FS$, 
which is automatically dimension- 
ed to 11 elements. When the index 
of the array is incremented beyond 
the last element, BASIC prints BAD 
SUBSCRIPT ERROR LINE 530. To 
correct the problem, enter line 530 
as follows: 



KB 530 PRINT CHR5(34)". . . ":FOR 
R=l TO C: IF SS(R) = *"' 
(SPACE }THEN SS(R)=" 
( RVS } " 



• The Plus/4 and 16 versions of 
"Polar Art" (November) fell victim 
to a bug in our lister program. The 
lister interprets the character Jt (pi) 
as a SHIFT-up-arrovv, but on the 
Plus/4 and 16, the up-arrow itself 
is a SHlFTed character. The correct 
way to type pi on a Plus/4 or 1 6 is 
to hold down the Commodore key 
and press the = key. Line 10 
should look like this: 

AQ 10 F=2*B=3:XS=160:YS=100:SF 
=.73:BC=0!CC=1 



• Several readers have had prob- 
lems getting "Math Worksheet" 
(July) to work with their Commo- 
dore 1526 or MPS-802 printers or 
with any printer which turns off 



double-width mode after each car- 
riage return. In the article, the au- 
thor mentions that changes must be 
made to lines 560, 570, 590, 600, 
and 610, but the changes are not 
discussed; these are listed below. 
Remember, if your printer uses a 
code other than CHR$(14) to turn 
on double-width printing, you need 
to make the appropriate changes. 
Also note that a companion pro- 
gram, "Division Worksheet," is 
scheduled for an upcoming issue, 

SJ 56B PRINT»4,C!iRS( 14) ; " 

{13 SPACES iMATH WORKSHIC 
ET"!PRIMT!i4, :PRINTf4, 

JR S70 PRINT#4,CKR?{ 14) r"NAME 
E30 33"!PRIMT?4 

QS 590 PRINT#4,CHR9(14) ; :F0R J 
=1 TO 9+I:PRINT#4, " 
I 2 SPACES)", -LEFT? (A? (P% 
(J) ),1 )" "; :NEXT J 

OE 595 PRINT#4,CRS;aiRS{14); 

XE 610 PRIST»4,CR5:aiR5(14) ; :F 
OR J=I TO 9+I;PRINT#4, " 
[2 SPACES 1^T3 "; :NEXT J 



Learn and ^POO 
UnderstandMLvO 

Inside and Out 



A book for all GEOS users, from the 
beginner to the programmer. 
Starts out with a introduction 
to GEOS and its applications/ 
to creating your own GEOS 
applications, GEOS file 
formats and internal 
workings of GEOS, 
A must for everyone that 
wants to learn and understanc 
GEOS inside and out. 



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STATION 

tor itie C-64. Apple II sec*s, and tBM 



I't) H<iv()3l-.M.H. Sci San Krjiiciscii, a yHM) 
(iH) HT|.yi-|) 



The first 1024 locations — from 
to 1023 — are sensitive and impor- 
tant (in all banks). The operating 
system needs this area, so leave it 
alone. Similarly, don't use memory 
above address 65279 in any bank. 

Bank 0, address range 1024- 
2047, is where the video matrix 
(screen memory) is normally locat- 
ed. Locations 2047-7167 contain 
general work areas, much of which 
may be used for video (check a 
memory map for details). From 
7168 to 65279 we find the area used 
for the BASIC program. When you 
write a BASIC program, you may 
want know where it ends, so check 
the contents of the pointer at 
4624-4625. You're free to use any 
higher addresses (you'll usually 
have plenty of space). 

An alternative for bank is to 
use the command GRAPHIC fol- 
lowed by any number from 1 to 4. 
A command of GRAPHIC returns 
you to a text screen, but now BASIC 
programs are moved up so that 
they start at address 16384. This 
liberates addresses 7168-16383 for 
graphics work — in fact, that's ex- 
actly why the GRAPHIC command 
shifts BASIC'S starting location. 

In bank 1, address range 1024- 
65279, we find the area used for 
BASIC'S working values (variables, 
arrays, and strings). Variables and 
arrays are stored from the lower 
end going upward; strings are 
stored from the top down. This 
means that there is no truly safe 
place in bank 1 unless you reset one 
of the pointers. Either set the start- 
of-variables pointer higher (with 
POKEs to 47 and 48) or set the lim- 
it-of-variables pointer lower (with 
POKES to 57 and 58). As you recall, 
we took a chance on our simple 
demonstration program; but if 
you're writing a serious program, 
do it right. 

No matter which bank or area 
you pick, you'll be able to call the 
character ROM into play if you 
want standard characters, or kick it 
out if you don't. And you can use 
split screens; the only limitation is 
that everything must fit into one 
bank and a single 16K area. 

Video Setup 128 is handy for 
screen arithmetic. It can give you in- 
sight into the workings of 1 28 video, 
and can help you with a wide vari- 
ety of video-oriented tasks. 
See program listing on page 110. • 



One-Touch 
Function Keys 



Keith Ashcraft 



This utility programs the 64's function keys for a variety of 
useful tasks. A7id best of all, it provides a menu of its functions 
on the top screen line. A disk drive is required. 



The Commodore 64's funcdon keys 
are a highly useful feature. Because 
they're programmable, they can be 
tailored to the needs of any user. 
"One-Touch Function Keys" adds 
four functions — including a direc- 
tory listing — to your 64. And you 
don't have to worry about forget- 
ting which key does what; they're 
always listed at the top of the screen. 
Because the program is written 
entirely in machine language, it 
must be typed in using "MLX," the 
machine language entry program 
found elsewhere in this issue. Be 
sure to read and understand the in- 
structions for using MLX before you 
begin typing in the program. When 
you run MLX, you'll be asked to 
provide starting and ending ad- 
dresses for the data you'll be enter- 
ing. The correct values are: 

starting address: COOO 
Ending address: CllF 

After you finish typing in the pro- 
gram, be sure to save a copy before 
leaving MLX. To load One-Touch 
Function Keys, use a statement of 
the form LOAD "filename", 8, 1. 
(Substitute ,1,1 for the ,8,1 if you're 
using tape instead of disk.) Type 
SYS 49152 to activate it. You should 
see the definition line on the top of 



the screen. 

Here's a list of the functions 
that One-Touch Funcdon Keys adds 
to the 64: 

• fl — The Directory 

Press f 1 at any time for a directo- 
ry listing. RUN/STOP halts the 
listing. 

• f3 — List 

The BASIC program currently in 
memory is listed when f3 is 
pressed. 

• f5 — Save 

Press f5 for SAVE to be printed 
on the screen. 

• f7 — Load 

Press f7 for LOAD to be printed 
on the screen. 

When you use Load or Save (f5 
and f7), you must insert the file- 
name of the program and press RE- 
TURN. For example, if you wanted 
to load a file named GAME.OBJ, 
you would press f7 and then 
"GAME.OBJ",8,l. 

RUN/STOP-RESTORE dis- 
ables the program, but typing SYS 
49152 reacdvates it. Try to avoid 
using One-Touch Function Keys 
with other programs that use the 
RAM area at 49152. 
See program listings on page 110. 9 



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Icon Changer For CEOS 



Douglas S. Curtis 



Change the appearance of GEOS icons with this powerful utili- 
ty. You can use the new icon designs included in the program 
or design your own. For the 64 with GEOS. 



GEOS, the new and powerful oper- 
ating system for the 64, uses graph- 
ic symbols called icons to represent 
various program operations and 
disk functions. "Icon Changer For 
GEOS" lets you easily redesign 
these icons. 

Typing It In 

The program is written in BASIC. 
After turning on your 64, type it in, 
and save a copy (do not load GEOS 
into memory). When you've done 
this, load Icon Changer, Now place 
a GEOS work disk {not the GEOS 
system disk) into the drive. Type 
RUN. The program asks for a file- 
name. Type in the name of the file 
whose icon you wish to change. 
The icon is read off the disk, dis- 
played, and labeled CURRENT 
ICON. The DATA statements in the 
program are labeled NEW ICON. 
You now choose whether or not to 
make the change. Type N to keep 
the current GEOS icon or Y to re- 
place it with the new one. Finally, 
you're asked if you want to change 
any other icons to the same pattern. 
Type Y or N. 

The sample icon redefinitions 
I've included with the program are 



mhm "■■""* "' "^ """ "" "^ 

t Ktrmnr 

nuNitrE tcLECTED IS >iEi)rAiNic 

IS THH CtlMCCI V/H7 V 

<- CHtlOR ICIM 

<- mn icM 

PRBCEEn UITM CHAIME V/m ■ 



"Icon Changer" lets you lailor the look 
of GEOS Desktop. 



stored in the program beginning at 
line 1000. Icons used by GEOS are 
in standard sprite format. If you 
wish to design your own, a sprite 
editor like "Sprite Magic" (August 
1984 GAZETTE) can generate the 
DATA statements for you. If you 
don't have a sprite editor, you must 
design the sprite on paper (see 
"Sprite Graph" in last month's is- 
sue) and supply the DATA state- 
ments yourself. I've included five 
new icon patterns in the DATA 
statements found at the end of the 
program lisdng. The program uses 



Figure 1 

TRACK IS SECTOR 1 



00 : 12 09 C3 05 07 44 45 53 4B 2& 54 4F S0 Ai3 A0 A0 

10 :A0 A0 A0 A0 A0 05 14 01 04 56 03 07 0F 00 47 00 

Figure 2 

TRACK 5 SECTOR 20 

00 :00 FF 03 15 BF FF FF FF 92 49 01 FF FF 01 B0 00 

10 :1D BF FF DD A0 00 5D BF FF CI A0 00 5D A0 00 55 

20 :A0 00 5D A0 00 41 A0 00 41 BB 00 41 AS 00 41 BF 

30 iFF CI 80 00 ID 80 01 D5 80 01 D5 B0 00 ID 80 00 

40 ;01 FF FF FF C3 04 01 06 04 05 04 06 04 44 65 73 



only one set of DATA statements at 
a time (the REM statements delimit 
the sets), so you must delete all the 
lines containing DATA statements 
before the icon definition that you 
want to use before running the pro- 
gram. One note of caution: Don't 
try to change the icon of a standard 
Commodore 64 file (which is clearly 
indicated on a GEOS Desktop 
menu). The data for it is stored inter- 
nally in the GEOS Desktop program. 

GEOS File Structure 

The data for the GEOS icons is 
stored on the disk. The problem in 
my initial investigation was finding 
exactly where. An examination of 
the disk revealed much about the 
file structure of GEOS. Using the 
program on the 1541 Test /Demo 
disk, I made a track/sector printout 
of a directory block (see Figure 1). 
The result showed that GEOS disks 
are somewhat different from stan- 
dard ones. Bytes and 1 of the 
block sdll point to the next block to 
read. The next byte (number 2) is 
still used to indicate the type of file. 
The next two bytes (numbers 3 and 
4) show the first change from stan- 
dard format. They now point to the 
VLIR (Variable Length Indexed Re- 
cord) blocks. {VLIR blocks are an 
integral part of the GEOS system.) 
They are filled with the track/- 
sector pointers for the GEOS appli- 
cation files, which is why the 
standard disk validate command 
will not work on a GEOS disk. The 
next 16 bytes are used to store the 
filename, just as on a standard disk. 
After the filename, the file structure 
changes again, and the next two 
bytes, 21-22 ($15~$16), are the 
track/sector pointer for the icon 
data. (This block also contains the 
file INFO: file descriptors, address- 
es, and comments.) The icon data is 
stored in the standard sprite format 
(3 X 21 bytes) from bytes 5-67 
($05-$43). (See Figure 2.) 
See program listing on page 114. • 



S4 COMPUTEfa OazattB Jsnuary 1987 



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Abacus iH 



Simply fill out the attached coupon 
and return it to one of our partici- 
pating dealers for your free 
Commodore 1 28™ Reference 
Card (Retail value $2,95), 
And while you're there, take a 
look at our complete line of 
top-notch software. No 
purchase necessary. 



* Available at participating dealers 





Use your '1 28 to communicate 
with the outside world 




SpeedTerm 123 



Cadpak 

Easy.to.use Interaclive draw- 
ing package for accurate 
graphic designs. Dimension- 
ing features to create exact 
scaled oulpul to all major 
dot-matrix printers. Input via 
keyboard or Irghtpen. Two 
graphic screens tor COPYing 
from one to the other, DRAW, 
BOX, ARC, ELLIPSE, etc. 
availabla. Define your own 
library of symbols/objacls- 
store up to 104 separate 
objects. CI 28 $59.95 
C-64 $39.95 

Spndttrm-ilS 

Lot your C-1 28 communicate 
with Ihe outside world. Obtain 
information from various 
computer notwortis, FlaxiWa, 
command driven terminal 
software package. Supports 
most modems for the C-128. 
Xmodem and Punier file 
transfer protocol. VTS2 
lerminal emulation with cur- 
sor keys, large 45 K capture 
buffer & user definable func- 
tion keys. C-1 2a $39.95 



Other Products: 

Personal Portfolio Manager 64 or 128 $39.95 
Technical Analysis System 64 or 1 28 $59.95 
PowerPlan spreafdsheet 64 $39.95 

Xref-BASIC cross reference 64or128 $17.95 

Commodore 64 and Commodora 128 are trademarks of Commodore Ltd. 
I "oo'o'FOFTohJECOI^OD'ORETTaREFERENCECARD' ~\ 

, One per customer. Good only while supplies last. This offer , 
1 ends January 31 , 1987. i 



I Name 



I Address 



Cit/ 



Slate 



_zie_ 



I 

[ Have you ever ourchasea Aiaacus products before? 
I Dealer 



P.O. Box 7219 Deptd Grand Rapids, MM9510 
Phone 51 6/241 -551 « T6lex 709-1 01 • Fax 61 6/241-5021 L _ .Goo^FORONEcoyMoooREjtza referjncecaro i 



Gl 



SALE I SUPER VALUES , s^vi 



PRO! i:CTC> 1:N 1 I.KPRIXIIS 



29 



SINGLE SIDED/DOUBLE 
DENSITY DISKS 

ea. 

100% Certified 3 W " noppy disks. UfeUme 
Warranty, automatic lint cleaning liner 
included. 1 Box of 100 $29.00 List $1 .99 ea. 
SALE $.29 ea. 

VOICE SYNTHESIZER 
SALE$'>Q Q^ 

Just plug it in and you can program words 
and sentences, adjust volume and pitch, 
make talking adventure games, sound action 
games and customized talkies! PLUS 
($19.95 value) TEXT TO SPEECH program 
included FREE, (Disk or Tape) List S89.00 
SALE $29.95 

VOICE COMMAND 

MODULE 
SALESIQ Q^ 

^^ m^^J List $80 

The VCM is a speech recognition device that 
lets you give commands to your C-64 with 
your voice. List $79.95 SALE $29,95 

SUPER AUTO DIAL MODEM 
SALE $70 QC 

At^ »^%J List $99 

Easier to use than dialing your telephone. 
Features on-line clock, dialing from 
keyboard, capture and display high 
resolution characters, and much more. 
Includes exclusive easy to use program for 
up and down loading to printer and disk 
drives. Bes/ in V.S.A. Lbt $99,00 SALE 
S29.95 

1200 BAUD MODEM 
SALE$7Q QC 

I y •^^J List $199 

Same features as the above modem along 
with C-128 mode and 1200 Baud speed. List 
$199.00 SALE $79.95 

SOFXWARE 

ACCIU 

ACTION PACK (D) »U.W 

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static; ANU TRAITS ID) l»,« 

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Fl- 1 OUT SIMULATOR II (D) I31.W 

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COUPON 



We pack a special software discount 
coupon with every Commodore 64 
Computer, Disk Drive, Printer, or 
Monitor we sellt This coupon allows 
you to SAVE OVER $250 off sale 
prices ! 



(EXAMPLES) 

PROFESSIONAL SOFTWARE| 

COMMODORE 64 



Name 

B. I. Homepak 
Super Huey II 
Right Control Joyslick 
Newsroom 
Leader Board 
TV Tuner 
Commiuido 
Create with Garfield 
Geos 

SAT -Hie Perfect Score 
Wocid Games 
Milliorudre 
Trinity 
Clia Partner 
Robotics Worlishop 
CI 28 Protrammers 
ReferetKC Guide 



List Sale Cotipon 



S49.9] 
SI9.9J 
S 19.95 

149.9] 
S39.9) 
599.9) 
S34.9J 
S29.95 
M9.9J 
169.9) 
S39.9J 
S29.9) 
$J4.9J 
569.9) 
S149.9J 
S21.9) 



J 19.95 

SI 4.93 
SI 2.95 
S32.9S 
S23.9J 
S49.95 
S23.95 
SI 6.95 
SJ9.9S 
S42.95 
S 24.95 
SI 6.95 
J24.9J 
S49.95 
S1Z4.95 
SI 2.95 



sn.95 

SI2.9J 
SIO.OO 
129.95 
122.95 
S39.95 
121.95 
114.95 
137.95 
139.95 
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122.95 
S44.95 
1114.95 
19.95 



(See over 100 coupon ilena ia our attalog.) 

Write or Call for sample 

Special Software 

Coupon! 



PHONE ORDERS 

8 a.m. -8 p.m. C.S.T. Weekdays 

9 a.m. -12 noon CSX Saturdays 
(312) 382-5244 



Add $3.00 for iKippirvg, Kondllng, ar>d Insuronc*. |ll)noi> r»ti<Joiril9 pl«ata a^6'/t % 
iq|«( tox. Add $6.00 for CANADA. PUEftTO RICO, HAWAII. ALASKA. APO FPO 
ord»ri. All orderi must be In U.S. DoMor*. WE DO NOT EXPORT TO OTHER 
COUNTRIES EXCEPT CANADA. Ertcioso Caiht«r Check, Monay Greyer or Pononal 
Ch*ck. Allow 1 4 doyy for dfllivery. 2 1o 7 doyi for phontt ordan, T doy Axpraii mall. 
Prk«» & AvojIobMtry subject to char>g« without notice. Hardware ihippLrvg prices 
vary accordlrng ra weighit. Please call foramoiinl^ No APO-FPOfof Monltort. 
VISA^MASTfR CAflO-CO<D, C.O.D. on phone orderi only. 



THE PROTECTO WARRANTY 

All Protecto'i products carry a minimum 90 day worronty. It oriylhlng 
foil* within 90 doy» from the date of purcKoso, simply send your product 
to ui vio Unit»d Parcel Service prepaid. We will IMMEDIATELY send you 
□ replacoment o» no chorgo via United Porcol Service prepold. Ttiit 
warronty provoi thot Wm Larm Our Cuttom^n. 



SAVE 



SUPER DEALS 

(312) 382-5244 1 (> C)KI>I:K 



SALE 




COMMODORE 64 
COMPUTER 
SALESQQ AA* 

•You pay only S98.0O for the Commodore 
64 when you purchase a Pocket Writer 64 
word processor for only S39.95. List 
S299,00 SALE 598.00 

1541 DISK DRIVE 
SALE $170 QC 

J. /J' •-7 •J List S249 

To run all that software and add to the 
prestige of your system, you'll want the 
J 541 disk drive. Runs all of the 3,000 plus 
pieces of software for the Commodore 64. 
ListS249.00SALES179.95 




COMMODORE 128 
COMPUTER 

SALE $ 299.00 u. S3. 

This powerful 128K computer has three 
modes. One for C-64 software, one for C- 
128 software, and one for CP/M business 
software. List $399.00 SALE S299.00 

340K 1571 DISK DRIVE 

SALE $2^0 no 

^%J -7 • \J\J List $349 

Double sided, single disk drive for the C-128 
allows you to use the C-128 mode plus CPM 
mode. 17 times faster than the 1541, and 
runs all the 1541 formats. List $349.00 
SALE S259.00 



BIG BLUE PRINTER 



SALE $39^95 



List SI 99 




This is the affordable printer you have been waiting for! This 8'/:" letter size, 80 column 
dot matrix, heat transfer printer features upper and lower case, underline, graphics, word 
processing, and much more. List SI 99.00 SALES39.95 

PREMIUM QUALITY 

150-170 CPS COMSTAR 

AERO 160 PRINTER 

SALE $199.00, 



List S499 

The Comstar Aero 160 gives you a 10" carriage, 150-170 CPS, 9x9 dot matrix with double 
strike capability for 18x18 dot matrix (near letter quality), high resolution bit image 
(120x144 dot matrix), underline, back spacing, left and right margin setting, true lower 
descenders with super and subscripts, prints standard, block graphics and special 
characters. It gives you print quality and features found on printers costing twice as much! 
(Centronics Parrallc! Interface) List S499,00 SALE $199.00 




PRINTER/TYPEWRITER 
COMBINATION 

SALE $199.95^,^^^,^ 

Superb Silver Reed letter quality daisy 
wheel printer/typewriter combination, just 
a flick of the switch to interchange. Extra 
large carriage, typewriter keyboard, 
automatic margin control, compact, 
lightweight, drop in cassette ribbon! (90 day 
warranty) Centronics Parrallel Interface is 
built in. List 299.00 SA[,E S199.95 



COMSTAR 1000 PRINTER 
SALE$17Q O^ 

X I y *y\J List S.149 
This is one of the best values today. Print 
letters, documents, ect., at 100 characters 
per second and has Near Letter Quality 

mode. Features are dot addressable 
graphics, adjustable tractor and friction 
feed, margin settings, pica, elite, condensed, 
italics, super & subscript, underline, bold, 
and double strike. Commodore Interface 
Included. List $349.00 SALE S179.95 



12" 80 COLUMN 
MONITOR 



SALE $79^95 



List 1129 



Super High Resolution green, screen 
monitor. 80 columns x 24 lines, easy to 
read, plus easy to adjust control knobs. 
Supreme Quality . Fantastic value, (cable 
$9.95) List $129.00 SALES79.9S 




14" COLOR MONITOR 
SALE$1"IQ Q^ 

X.tJ ^ • ^ %J U%\. S329 

This premium quality monitor comes with 
speaker and audio hook up, High 
Resolution, clear screen, 40 columns x 24 
lines, front panel controls and more. Also 
be use with VCR. One year Ltd. warranty, 
(cable $9.95) List $329.00 SALE $139.95 




14" RGB & COMPOSITE 
COLOR MONITOR 

SALES 237.00. ,.s.99 

Must be used to get 80 columns in color with 
80 column computers (CI 28 - IBM - Apple) 
(RGB cable $19.95) Add $14.50 shipping. 
List $399.00 SALE $237.00 

TV TUNER 
SALES dO QS 

This tuner has dual UHF/VHF selector 
switches, mute, automatic fine tuning and 
computer/TV selector switches. Hook it up 
between your computer and monitor! Inputs 
included for 300 ohm, 75 ohm, and UHF. 
List $129.95 SALE S49.95 



CALL BEFORE YOU ORDER: 

LOWER & AND WE OFFER 
SPECIAL SYSTEM DEALS • 



ATTENTION 

COMPUTER CLUBS • DEALERS 
We off Br big volume discounts! 

CALL XODAY 



PROTECTO ENTERPRIZES 

We JLove Our Customers 

22292 N. Pepper Rd., Barrington, Illinois 60010 

(312) 382-5244 to order 



Medium-Resolution Graphics 

For The 64 



Louis Giglio 



This program adds a brand new grap^hics mode to your 64: 
medium resolution. Use a simple command to plot points in 16 
colors on an 80 X 50 grid. You can mix text with graphics, as 
ivell. 



Sometimes you just don't need all 
the detail that the high-resolution 
bitmapped screen affords. On the 
other hand, the resolution of the 
text screen is very low — 40 X 25. 
Often, a compromise between the 
two would be ideal. A medium- 
resolution screen would require less 
memory than a hi-res screen and 
offer more detail than a character 
screen. 

Program 1, "Medium Resolu- 
tion 64," uses standard Commodore 
graphics characters to provide an al- 
ternative 80 X 50 medium-resolu- 
tion multicolor screen. This format is 
useful for games and other pro- 
grams that require simple graphics. 

Medium Resolution 64 is writ- 
ten entirely in machine language, 
so you must use "MLX," the ma- 
chine language entry program 
found elsewhere in this issue, to 
type it in. After loading and run- 
ning MLX, you'll be asked for start- 
ing and ending addresses for the 
data you'll be entering. For Medium 
Resolution 64, respond with the 
following: 

Starting address: C738 
Ending address: C927 

After you've finished typing in 
all the data, be sure to save a copy 
to tape or disk before exiting from 
ee COMPUWs Gazene January 1987 



MLX, To use Medium Resolution 
64, type: 

LOAD ■'filemime",8,l 

Replace the 8 with a 1 if you're 
using tape rather than disk. After 
the program has finished loading, 
type: 

NEW 

The NEW command is manda- 
tory^ — it resets some important 
BASIC pointers. 

Plotting And Printing 

Medium Resolution 64 can plot in- 
dividual points on the normal char- 
acter screen. Use the command: 
SYS 5I000,X,Y,C 

X and Y are the horizontal and ver- 
tical screen coordinates, respective- 
ly. The X values may range from 
to 79 and the Y values from to 49. 
If you try numbers outside this 
range an error will occur. The val- 
ues of X and Y, however, do not 
have to be integers; fractional val- 
ues will be rounded. C determines 
the color of the pixel. Use the stan- 
dard color values (0-15), 

Since Medium Resolution 64 
uses the normal character screen, 
setting the color of one pixel will 
also set the color of the three neigh- 




This screen, one of several from "Medium 
Resolution Demo" (Program 2), sboivs 
how icxl IS easily comlnned with color- 
ful graphics cm an SO X 50 screen. 

boring pixels that share the charac- 
ter cell (remember, color memory 
has 40 X 25 resolution), so you 
may have to experiment a bit to get 
the effect you want. 

The normal character screen is 
used, so you may still use PRINT 
and POKE to display characters on 
the screen in the usual way. 

Program 2 is a short demon- 
stration program written in BASIC. 
Before you load and run Prc->gram 2, 
be sure that the machine language 
for Medium Resolution 64 is al- 
readv in memorv (and that vou've 
typed NEW). 

Many machine language pro- 
grams use the 4K block of memorv 
located at 49152-53247 (SCOOO- 
SCFFF). Medium Resolution 64 oc- 
cupies locations 51000-51492, 
leaving free space above and below 
itself. Therefore, it remains compat- 
ible with many machine language 
utilities, including the DOS Wedge. 
See program listings on page 1 09. q 



Introducing a new printer 
that's based on an old favorite. 




' Commodore is a reelslered >riiJcmi!rk ofCummudorf niisiiinst Miichincs. Inc. 



PRO-TECH 



RETAIL 
$120 



559 




GREEN SCREEN 



MONITORS 



RETAIL $299 







FULL COLOR 



RETAIL 
$400 




RGB 



RETAIL 
$200 



$129 



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FOR 
COMMODORE 



PRINTERS 







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$349 



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128 COMMODORE SYSTEM 





256 K. COLOR AMIGA SYSTEM 

256 K.AMIGA CPU 

A1010 3'/!" DISK DRIVE 

A1080 COLOR MONITOR 

A1050 256 K. EXPANSION 



COMMODORE 128 

*199 

WITH PURCHASE OF iS71 



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$258 



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Minneapolis, MN 55430 
(612)560-6603 



Data-Aid 



Henry Pesch 



This clever program is helpful when you're 
working with DATA statements. It adds several 
new commands that come in handy for pro- 
gramming or typing in data. Although the pro- 
gram is written entirely in machine language, 
you do not have to know machine la^rguage to 
use it. For the Commodore 64, 



Reading numbers from DATA statennents and POKE- 
ing them into memory is one of the most useful tech- 
niques available to programmers. DATA statements 
can contain sprite data, machine language routines, or 
sound parameters, for example. When you're working 
with DATA statements in your programs, "Data- Aid" 
can help in a variety of ways. 



1986 TAX 
RETURN HELPER 



Fast and easy income tax preparation 

• This is the 6th annua! edition - thousands of repeat customers 

• Prepares Form 1040, Schedules A (itemized deductions), B (in- 
terest), C (Business), D (Capitai gains), E (Suppiemental income), 
G (income averaging), SE (Seif-employment tax), W (Married 
couple deduction). Forms 2441 (Chiid care credit), 2106 
(Empioyee expenses) and 4562 (Depreciation), 

• Works like a spreadsheet - all the lines affected by a change 
are Instantly updated, 

• Data can be printed, saved on disl< and updated, 
■ Also included: 



TAX DBASE 



A data base program to create and maintain files of tax related 
items (medical , car expenses, etc,} that can be used directly by 
the lax programs. 

• Can be used all year round. Also good (or many other account- 
ing jobs (checkbook balancing, etc) 

Price is tax deductible. C64 disk. Standard version: $33 (i- $1 .50 
S&H) 

PHOFESSIONAL VERSION - also prints data on IRS forms: $45 
(+ $1.50 S&H) 

Previous customers prices: $21 .SO {standard) and $29,50 (pro- 
version) (-»■ $1,50 S&H) 

Availability: end cf December, 1986 

KSOFT CO. 

845 WELLNEB RD, 

NAPERVILLE, IL 60540 

(312) 961-1250 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED OR MONEY BACK 



New, Helpful Commands 

Data-Aid is a machine language program that occupies 
IK of memory beginning at location 49152. Type it in 
with "MLX," the machine language entry program 
found elsewhere in this issue. After loading and run- 
ning MLX, you'll be asked for a starting address and an 
ending address for the data you'll be entering. Answer 
the prompts with the following values: 

starting address: COOO 
Ending address: C407 

After you've saved a copy, load the program with 
LOAD" filename", 8,1 (LOAD" filename", I, \ for tape 
users). Type NEW; then start Data-Aid with SYS 
49152. The screen turns green and this message 
appears: 

DATA-AID ACTIVATED 

Several commands have now been added to 
BASIC. 

The exclamation mark (!) serves as a flag for Data- 
Aid. When the computer sees it, it knows it must inter- 
pret the next letter as a Data-Aid command. Let's look 
at each of the available commands. 

!R — Restore. This sets the DATA pointers to a specified 
program line. The next READ will get the first item of 
the chosen line. This is similar to BASIC 7.0's RE- 
STORE line number command. 

The following example shows how to use !R; 

10 DATA HARRY,BILL,JACK 

20 DATA MARY,LIZ,ANN 

30 DATA 20,23,19 

40 IR 20:READ A$:IR 10:READ B$: 

SO L = 30:1R L:READ N 

60 PRINT A$;B$,N 

RUN 

MARYHARRY 20 

READY 

As you can see, !R works with any numeric expression, 
even a variable. !R can also be used in direct mode. 
!S— Speed POKE. Transfers numbers from DATA 
statements to memory very quickly. !S 100,5000 reads 
byte data (decimal integers in the range 0-255) begin- 
ning at line 100 and POKEs them into memory begin- 
ning at location 5000, The process ends when a 
negative number is read. This method is four times 
faster than the following commonly used technique; 

10 READ A:IF A<0 THEN RETURN 
20 POKE M,A:M -=1^+1:00X10 10 

!S can be used within a program or from direct mode. 
Use this technique only when your DATA consists of 
numbers between and 255, Remember to use a nega- 
tive number as the last item of the DATA block — it 
isn't POKEd into memory; it's used to mark the end of 
the data, 

ID— Create BASIC DATA lines from memory. Use this 
when you already have a machine language routine (or 
sprite data) in memory, and you want to generate 
DATA statements from RAM. For example: 
ID 64,1000,49151 

writes 64 lines (16 numbers each) of DATA statements. 
The first line generated is numbered 1001, and the first 



92 COMPUTBI's Qazetie January 1987 



T H E 



S T 



COMPUTERS 



With the introduction of the 
ST computers comes a new 
kind of computer language: 



ill 



'The most advanced, most 
powerful inicrocoinputcr 
your money can buy." 

— Creaiive Compuiing 



RAISE. 




"The best hardware vaiuc of" the year." 

— Infoworld 

"We have spent the last three months 
evaluating the Atari and have eome lo the 
conclusitm that it can't he licat as a 
low -cost telecommunications terminal, 
drafting workstation, or for quick graphics 
visual ization " — MkrotUncs 

"We are most impressed with the clarity 
of the yraphics, with the speed of the disk 
I/O (input/output), arid with the ST's 
value.' ' — Byte Magazine 

"With the impressive ST, Atari has 
delivered on its promise of power without 
the price." — Family Cotuputing 

"Faster and with better graphics capal)ili- 
ties than an IliM/AT '", it eould be a j^reat 
vehicle for low -cost networks, desktop 
publishing? and visual database manage- 
ment software." — Miaotimes 



"AH of the tit splays arc clear, sharp, 
readable, and fhckcr free. Wc 
were particularly impressed by 
the clarity of the high-resolution 
monochrome." 

— Byte Magazine 



"The ST's readily apparent 
strong point is speed. Com- 
pared to the Macintosh™, 
working wiih the ST is extraordinary." 
— John Dvorak, Salt Francisco Examiner 



■ ^ -■ ^ ^ ^ -^ 



yvo:i:i'o:o:ti:^l'.H mffiR 



''Since the pinouts are standard, it is also 
possible for various software packages 
to support an even wider range of output 
devices — even faster printers and high- 
end plotters." — Microtimes 

"The ST is noticeably faster than the 
Macintosh, not only because of the faster 
clock rate but becau.se it has a faster 
disk drive." — Personal Computing 

"The ST is an amazing bargain, much 
more of a computer 'for the rest of us' 
than iVI ac ever w^s." — Byte Magazine 

"From here on you had better think of Atari 
as a major player in the computer game." 

— Jerry Poiiriielle, hifoworld 

The 520Sr" with 5J2K of memory ix 
under $mO. The lOdOST" with a full mega- 
byte is under $1,000. No wonder the experts 
are impressed. 

To experience the ST excilement 
for yourself, sec your Atari dealer 
For ihe one nearest xoti 
call 1800443 8020. 
9:00 AM-5 :00 PM 
M<mday-Friday 
Pacific Time. 




ATARr 



^ 



Technology So Advanced, It's Affordable. 

AlaM, ST, SMSTflrHjiO'llJ&TaipliiiWmflrkR.u'ripaialttfedtrflJornflrksof Al*if. Ciirporfltion 
\QM unit M are 'rjidomftrhsor rDfl.pilftro^ irncJemflika of tnlnrniirionnl liusmoii MichiritfiiCorporfilion Wawrvtwii i»a iradttmark ksriMd Ed Apple CwnpuCor, Inc 

; r^Sg Atari' Corpordtion 



^ 



LYCO 
COMPUTER 

MARKETING & CONSULTANTS INC. 



COMMODORE ^^| 


MICROPROSE ^M 


^H 


EPYX 




UNISON WORLD 


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SUBLOGIC H 

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T 1 
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(Amiga) 


Perfect Calc 
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Football 25 95 ^^H 
Scenery Disk EA 14 95 ^^H 
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L ■ 
L ■ 


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Wtostlinti 


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: SUB LOGIC 


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Wordwriter 42 95 '^^H 
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^1 


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Leader Board 


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1 ■ 






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Executive Disk 


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Music Studio 31 75 ^^^H 


JOYSTICKS 

Bat handle 16 75 
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Super 3-way 19.99 
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Sperls 13.75 ^^M 

SoFi 13 75 ^H 

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Taos Times 
Basketball 
Baseball 


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26 75 ^^H 
28 75 ^^^B 
28 75 ^^H 


Slick Stick 6 95 
Economy 5.95 
Black Max 8 95 
Epyx 500XJ 14 95 


Holiday Paper 


S.95 ^^^B 


Tass Times . 72.75 ^^H 


3 ■ 






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^^^^^H 


Rocky Horror 18 75 ^^H 
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PRINTER SUPPLIES 




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Paperclip wf^peii pk 4B 95 ^^H 


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3000 9' /x 11 white 29 95 
1000 9'/!xii white 16.95 
1000 Mailing labels 1«3 6 95 




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1 . Satisfied Santa for 6 years. 

2. 24 hour shipping on in-stock items. 

3. Offer C.O.D. with no (deposit. 

4. Widest selection of name brand products. 

5. Full mfg. warranty applies. 

6. Courteous and experienced staff, 

7. Trained customer service dept. 

8. PO's accepted from educational institutions. 



■'■/ci t:w<'S 

9. Access to nation's largest inventory. 

10. All merchandise factory fresh. 

1 1 . Free shipping on prepaid cash orders. 

12. Compare our prices. 

13. Easy toll free access. 

14. Air freight service available. 

15. Full accessory line. 

16. Buy with confidence. 



.IL 



PRINTER 

NX-10. .219 

*120cps 
*30cps NLQ 

* Front control panel 

* Tractor & ff iclion feed 
*Full 1 year warranty 



TOSHIBA 

321 PIS 479 

351 shecl lopder 529 

P3«1P 669 

P341S 699 

P35W 999 



f 



LYCO 
COMPUTER 

MARKETING & CONSULTANTS INC. 



PRINTERS 



STAR MICRONICS 

NAIOc NEW 

l.V1?-10(New) 



NL-10 
NX10 
NB15 
SG-1S 
SO-15 
SR-IO 



175 
259 
219 
CALL 
367 
438 
469 



CITIZEN 




120D 
MSP- 10 

MSP'tS.. 
MSP -20 
MSP-25 
Premier 35 

While they tasl!' 


179 
CALL 
CALL 

32S 

4as 

. 449 


SILVER REED 

EXP 420 P lOS 

EXP 600 P 489 
EXP aO<J P 649 
EXP 770 740 



OKIDATA 

Okimale 20 ST C/»LL 

292 CALL 

393 CALL 

120 NLO . CALL 

182 . . CALL 

192* CALL 

193* CALL 



JUKI 

Juki 6100 

JuKi 6510 

Juki 6300 . - 

RS-233 serial E>oaTd 



CALL 

CALL 
CALL 

55 



EPSON 

LX86 229 

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EX 1000 NEW 

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SP-1000 AcenliQfiics 
sp-iooo vC(E-e4) 
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SP-1000AP. APIIe 

BP-1300 

BP-5200 

BP-5420 

Color m 

aP-5420 liBtJon 

SP-1000 ribbon 



185 
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185 
185 
169 
640 
999 
119 
1250 
8 50 



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lOeOl 199 

10911 269 

10921 . . CALL 

1592 419 

1595 S49 

3131 249 

3151 . SAVE 



LEGEND 



10B0 
1380 
1385 



159 
.199 
229 
289 



SEIKOSHA 



PRINTER 

SP-1000VC..165 

* 100 CpS 

* aOcpsNLO 

* Djreci connect C-64, 
128 printer 

* Tractor 8, friction feed 

* 2-year warranty 



DIABLO 

D2S 549 

P-32CQ1 699 

635 1029 

D-aO IF 2395 



INTERFACING 

ORANGE MICRO 

Grappler CD 69 

XETEC 

Super Graphix 64 . . 64 
Super Graphix Jr 64 . 45 

TYMAC 

Connection 49 

DSI 



SV. DISKETTES 
MAXELL 



SSDD 




9 9S 


OSDD. 


BONUS 


12.99 


SSDD 




6 09 


DSDD 


SKC 


7 60 


SSDO 




8 50 


DSD 




9 5L 



PPI 



44.95 



MODEMS 



SUPRA 

Supra 1064 . . 49.95 



COMMODORE 

1670 129 



3,5 DISKETTES 

3M 

SSOD 16 99 

OSDD 23.90 

MAXELL 
SSDO 1699 

DSDO ... , 2399 

VERBATIM 
SSDO IB 99 

DSDD 24 99 



DRIVES 

INDUS 

GTC-64 179 

COMMODORE 

1571 CALL 

15410 . CALL 

COMTEL 

Enhancer 2000 ... 149 



NOT ALL MAIL ORDER FIRMS ARE CREATED EQUAL 



!^as^ 



Lyco Computer is one of the 
oldest and most established 
computer mail order firms /n the 
nattof). Our services, prices anc 
excellent staff cannot be imitated. 
Compare our services. — 









tb=^_J 




TOLL FREE 1-800-233-8760 



IN PA 717-494-1030 

CUSTOMER SERVICE 717-494-1670 

or send to 

Lyco Computer 

P.O. Box 508B 

Jersey Shore, PA 

17740 



H 



tvts^ 



HOURS 

Mon-T(iuf 9 AM-S P^ 
Fti 9 AM-6 PM 

Sat 10 AM-6 PM 



ln-$[OCk (toms &ft pped within 24 hrs ol Ofder Nodeposilon C.O.D Ofdcrs Frecship- 
piny on prepaid ca^ orders wi1ht.n the continental U.S. Vorume d'scoufils avftilabl^ 
PA residanls arfd sales laji. APO, FPO and miernalional orders ndd SSOO plus 2Vu 
far prjorsly m*-t!l AdveniWd prices show i^.h discount for Cflsh., atJfJ ^'^a lof MasterCard 
and V]SA PersoTal chacks require ^ weeks cl&rsrance bofore shipping We cnnnol 
guiuanlQg Cpmpjitibility. Wo only ship Jactory fresh rnurchandrss. Auk ^Ijout UPS Blua 
and rfld (atjel shifjptng. All merctiandiw carriod undor mianufacjuror'swananty Roiurn 
fealriclion npplicaolo. Relurn fluthon^adon required. All items subjocl lo change wittioul 
noitce 








ACIDiDI 13Ai 

Adventuio Conilructlon 27. 3S 

Air Rdscuc I 24,9S 

Alcaiar 20.9S 

Atiin Addition S3.9S 

Alllgstor Mfi 23.9$ 

Alphabet Circus 20. 9S 

Alphabet Zoo M.SB 

Allsf Ego (Femote) 34. 9S 

Altor Ego iMalo 34. 9S 

American ChBllenBO 20.95 

Arehon 12.95 

Archon II 24.95 

Bard's Tata 2T.sa 

Sollblaier 23.49 

Ssck to Baslci 134.95 

Ballyhoo 27.95 
Bank Street Storybook 27-95 

Bank Street Filer 34.95 

Bunk Street Mailer 34.95 

Bank Street Writer 34.95 

Basic Toolkit 29.95 

Bntllelront 27.95 

Blazing Paddles 24.95 

Bop n Wrestle 20.95 

Boppies Word Chase 20.95 

Borrowed Time 20.95 

Boston Computer OlBt 34.95 

Build a Book 17.95 

Bumblo Gamaa 27,95 

Bumble Plot 27.95 

Carmen Sandlego 22.45 

Carriers at War 34.95 
Chmpshp Load Runner 17.95 

Chem Lab 27.95 

Chestmostsr SOOO 27.95 

Clip An (vol t) 15.95 

Clip An (vol 2) 21.95 

Colossus IV 24.95 

Color Me 20.95 

CompuServe Slincr 21.95 

Contllct In Vietnam 27.95 

Copy 64 18.50 
Countdown to Shutdown 20.95 

Create witti Carlreld 20.95 

Crimson Crown 12,95 

Crossword Magic 30,00 

Crusade in Europe 22.95 

Cut & Paste 12.95 

Cutthroats 23.69 

Deadline 23.00 

Demolition Division 23.95 

Designer's Pencil 20.95 

Donaltl Duck s PPaygr. 17,95 

Dragon Mli 23.95 

Early Games 15.95 

Easy B» ABC* 20 95 

Elite 20.95 

Enchanter 20,95 

Europe Abliue 30.50 

F-15 Strlcke Eagle 20,00 

Facemnher 14,95 

Family Roots 149,95 

FBlrliglit 20,95 

Financial Cookbook 34.95 

Flight Simulator II 30.50 

Fraction Factory 15.95 
Freddys Puzzling Adven. 20.95 

Fast Tracks 20,95 

Football 27,9! 

Gnmemakcr 27,95 

Gato 19,95 

Gertrude's Puiilet 20,95 

Gertrude's Secrets 20,95 

Ghost Busters 22,0[] 

G I Joe 19.95 
Gr Amerlcan'ftoad Race 20,95 

Golden Oldies 20.95 



Hey Diddle Diddle 

HItchhIkcr'a Guide 

Homework Kelp: Math 

Homework Help: Writing 

Hot Wheels 

In tide I 

Infiltrator 

Impossible Mission 

Jef 

Jet Combat Simulator 

Juggle's Raint>ow 

Karateka 

Kennedy Approach 

Keys to Typing 

Kids on Keya 

Kid Writer 

KIndercomp 

Koronis Rift 

Kung Fu 

Kung Fu --2 

Leader Board 

Little Comp People 

Load Runner 

Lords of Conquest 

Luscher protile 

Mail Order Monsters 

Magic Spells 

Mask Parade 

Master of the Lamps 

Masterly pa 

Math Blaster 

Merlin 54 

Meteor MuillpFicatlon 

Mickey's Bp, Adv. 

Micro League Baseball 

Micro League Manager 

Micro League Team Disk 

MIg Alley Ace 

Mind Forever Voyaging 

Mind Mirror 

Mind Prober 

Mindshadow 

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Most Amazing Thing 

Mcplown Hotel 

Moplown Parade 

Movie Maker 

Movie Monsters 

Mult I plan 

Murder on Missiaslppi 

Music Construction 

l^usic Studio 

Nato Commander 

Newsroom 

Number Farm 

One-On.Qne 

Ogre 

Paper Clip 

Paper Clip W/5peilpak 

Perfect Score 

PF5: File 

Piece of Cake Math 

PInbail Construction 

Pilfall II 

PItstop II 

Planetfall 

Print Shop 

Print Shop Companion 

Pr. Shop Gr 1, a, or 3 

Print Shop Refill 

Puzzle Master 

Quest 

Rainbow Painter 

Rhymes and Riddles 

Co. Topes 

Sorgon III 

SAf(Harcourt| 

Shapes A Color Rodeo 

Sideways 



20,95 
29.95 
49.95 
12.95 
14. 9S 
21. 7S 
22.95 
22.95 
20.95 
26.00 
20.95 
35,00 
S7,95 
20,95 
20.95 
19,45 
24.95 
17,95 
14,95 
18.95 
14.95 
23,49 
20 ,9 S 
20,95 
27,95 
24.95 
19,45 
24.95 
20.95 
12.95 
20.75 
27.95 
10,95 
23,25 
26,95 
34,95 
23,95 
17,95 
22,50 
27,95 
13,95 
24,95 
30,95 
24,95 
20,95 
20,95 
23,95 
18,95 
27,95 
27.95 
34,95 
27.95 
43.95 
24.95 
12,95 
24.95 
19. 7S 
30.50 
20.95 
12.95 
27.95 
41.95 
55. 9S 
49.95 
34.95 
24.95 
12.95 
20.95 
23.50 
22. CD 
26.59 
21.95 
13.95 
12.25 
34.95 
12.95 
24.95 
14.95 
12.95 
27.20 
55.95 
20.95 
20.95 



Spy vs. Spy 
Slarcioss 
Star Trek 
Shck Bear ABC 

Numbers 

Math 

Opposite? 

Reading 

Shapes 
Stickers 

Summer Games I or II 
Super Boulder Dash 
Suspect 
Suspended 
Swiltcalc ce4 
SwiltcBlc C12S 
Sword ol Kadash 
Sylvia Porter C64 
Sylvia Porter CI 26 
Tapper 

Temple of Apshai Trii 
TImeworks 
Touchdown Football 
Toy Shop 
Tracer Sanction 
Trains 

Transylvania 
Type! 

Typing Tutor IM 
Ultima III 
Ulllma IV 
Ultimate Wizard 
Verb Viper 
Will Writer 
Winnie the Pooh 
Winter Games 
Wishbrlnger 
Witness 

Whole Brain Spelling 
Word Attack 
Word Invasion 
Word Man 
Word Master 
Word Radar 
Word Spinner 
World s Criesi Baseball 
World's Grtesi Football 
Writing Adventure 
Xyphus 
Zork I 
Zork IJ 



19.95 
1B.95 
26.00 
1995 
36.95 
26.95 
20,95 
20.95 
34.95 
^fi.OO 
20.9S 
29.00 
25.75 
ID 95 
20.95 
20.95 
20.95 
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2495 
22,45 
12,95 
26,00 
26,00 
34,96 
41,95 
12,95 
34.95 
41 95 
20.95 
22.45 
69.95 
12.95 
41.95 
20.95 
18.95 
12,35 
27.95 
2a, 50 
34,95 
41,95 
20,95 
23,95 
28,45 
17,95 
21,45 
27,95 
22,00 
20,95 
26,95 
23,95 
23,95 
23,95 
23,95 
20,50 
19,45 
22,45 
41,95 
12,95 
21,75 
24,75 



Aegis Animator 

Draw 

Aegis Images 

Adventure Construction 

Analyze 

Archon 

Archon II Adept 

Arctic FoK 

An Pack 'I 

BBS-PC! 

Borrowed Time 

Chestm aster 2000 

OeluiePaint 

DeluxePnInI 'ri 

DeluxePaint «2 

Dclu^eVideo 

Financial Cookbook 

Golden Oldies 

Hacker 

Haley Pro|ect 

Impact 

Instant Music 

Keyboard Cadet 

Leader Board 

Liltle Computer People 

Marble Madness 

Matertype 

MaxlComm 

MaiiDesk 

MaxiPian 

Mean 19 

Mindshadow 

Music Studio 

Onc-on-One 

On Line 

Racter 

Rogue 

Scribble! 

Seven Cities of Gold 

Silent Service 

Skyfox 

Temple Apshal 

Trinity 

VIP Prolessional 

Winter Games 



97.95 
139,95 
55,95 
27.95 
59.95 
22.00 
27.95 
27.95 
41.95 
59.95 
31.95 
31.95 
69.95 
20,95 
2095 
69,95 
34,95 
24,95 
31.95 
31.95 
139,95 
34.95 
27.95 
27.95 
34.95 
34.95 
27.95 
34.95 
49.95 
69,95 
34.95 
31,95 
41.95 
27.95 
48.95 
31.95 
39.95 
59.95 
27.95 
27.95 
27.95 
27.95 
27.95 
139.95 
39.95 



HARDWARE 

Oatecase 7.95 

Disk Notcher 4.9S 

Fllp.n-File 10.95 

Lemon 27.95 

Lime 41.95 

Grappier CD 79,95 

Samsung Color Monitor 169.95 



Star LV 1210 199,95 

Star KX'IO 269,95 

Star Powertype 344,95 

Printer Stand 16,95 

Color Ribbons CALL 



SILICON EXPRESS 

5955 E. Main St. Columbus, Ohio 43213 
1-614-668-6868 



YOUR ORDER FORM 
SILICON EXPRESS 

5955 E. Main Street Columbus, Ohio 43213 

NAItlE . 

ADDRESS 

CITY 

CHARGE CARD (* 



STATE . 



.ZIP. 



Exp, Date 



QTY. 


DESCRIPTION 


PRICE 




















Computer Type SHIPPINS 




Phone 


Mn TOTAL 





NodcJc!iiiDriai sufcna^^^ori MaiiercArd Vni cr Senoci p>lJrc^9SB orders P'O'son^icriie'CAi. 
Ali^kV 2 *9*l(i S^ipiO'ng' chaf^ek i'9 S3 00 m-mTium Ohio rtsi^]? nlA add S'-'iH iiB^a sa'ea 





memory location PEEKed is 49152. 
Since DATA statements use up to 
four times more memory than the 
byte data, make sure you have 
plenty of memory free when using 
this command. If an OUT OF 
MEMORY ERROR occurs, the com- 
puter must be turned off and back 
on. The format of the command is 
!D N,LM- This command writes N 
BASIC lines of DATA statements 
beginning at line number L+l and 
including byte data beginning at lo- 
cation M + 1 , !D can also be used in- 
side a program {but after execution 
you'll be in BASIC'S direct mode), 

!M — Magnify DATA. This com- 
mand enlarges the screen display of 
DATA items one by one. It's useful 
when even your most determined 
efforts at finding typing mistakes 
fail. !M 150 displays the first DATA 
items on line 150 in the middle of 
your screen magnified to four times 
the size of a standard character. 
Press RETURN to magnify the next 
item in sequence. The line number 
is also displayed (after the first 
line). Common mistakes to look for 
are: O instead of 0, 1 instead of 1, 
missing commas or periods instead 
of commas, and transpositions Uke 
typing 125 instead of 215. !M is 
most useful with byte data. With 
string data, only the last three char- 
acters are displayed. 
!C — Change colors. This makes it 
easy to change the screen colors to 
find the most comfortable combina- 
tion. For instance, if you want to 
change the border color to red, 
screen color to yellow, and print 
color to black, !C 2,7,0 does the job. 
The format of the statement is: !C 
border,screen,print. !C works in both 
program and direct mode. 
!B — Beep. !B G5 plays a note G in 
octave 5. Notes may be C. D, E, F, 
G, A, or B, and octaves range from 
to 7. This command works in both 
program and direct mode. 
!Z — Disables Data-Aid. Be sure you 
use this command before you toad 
anything else into locations 
49152-50175, where Data-Aid is 
resident. Data-Aid redirects the 
vector to the IGONE routine, BA- 
SIC'S routine to execute statements. 
If you don't use the !Z command to 
restore the original vector address, 
the computer will crash when you 
execute the next BASIC statement. 
See program listings on page 115. o 



CP/M: 

Surviving With 
40 Columns 



Ken Arbuckle 



CP/M was designed to be used with 80-column monitors. If 
you have a iO-column monitor, the tips in this article will help 
you manage. For the Commodore 128 with 1571 disk drive. 



If you've tried to use the CP/M op- 
erating system that came with your 
128, you've probably discovered 
that nearly all CP/M programs are 
written to work with an 80-column 
screen, The 128's 40-column solu- 
tion to this problem is to let you 
look at a "virtual" 80-column 
screen 40 columns at a time. CON- 
TROL-- and CONTROL-- are used 
to move a 40-column window over 
the 80-column screen. This can be 
disorienting and tedious — ten key- 
presses are required to get from one 
side of the screen to the other. The 
ideal solution, of course, is an 80- 
column monitor like the 1902. But if 
you've got a composite 40-column 
monitor, there are ways to live (at 
least temporarily) with a 40-column 
window. 

The Printer (CTRL-P) 

One thing you can do is echo work 
to the printer. CONTROL-P sends 
(nearly) everything to the printer as 
well as to the screen. A second 
CONTROL-P turns the printer off. 
Most printers normally print in 80 
columns, and a printed copy can be 
a great help when you're starting 
out. However, echoing to the print- 
er slows everything down drastical- 
ly. You may soon grow impatient 
with it. 



The DEVICE Command 

You can shorten some of the 80- 
column screen displays by chang- 
ing the screen-display parameters. 
This can be done with the DEVICE 
command. Try this: List the directo- 
ry (by typing DIR or pressing F3) of 
your CP/M disk. The screen dis- 
play is 80 columns wide. Now (after 
the system prompt A>) type DE- 
VICE CONSOLE [COLUMNS = 35] 
and press RETURN. Do another 
DIR (or F3). Everything should ap- 
pear on the first 35 columns of the 
screen. Unfortunately this doesn't 
always work — -some programs still 
insist on filling the entire 80- 
column display (the HELP program 
is one example). Use DEVICE 
CONSOLE [COLUMNS = 80] to go 
back to 80-column mode. 

A Better Scroll 

The 80-column displays would be 
easier to deal with if scrolling capa- 
bilities were improved. You can use 
the KEYFIG.COM program (found 
on the CP/M system disk) to help 
do this. Since you'll be making 
changes to your disk, you should be 
working with a copy of the CP/M 
system disk, not the original. If you 
aren't, use the F0RMAT.COM pro- 
gram to format a blank disk and the 
PIP.COM program to copy your 

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original CP/M disk to tJie new disk 
(A>pip e:=a:*.*). Wlien this is done, 
work from your copy and proceed. 
Run the program (command 
file) named KEYFIG by typing KEY- 
FIG at a system A> prompt. Press 
RETURN, and CP/M will load and 
start this program. To the first que- 
ry, Do you want help?, answer n. The 
rest of the program is menu-driven. 
Use the 128 cursor-up and cursor- 
down keys (the ones on the top row 
of your keyboard) and the RETURN 
key to make your choices. Then 
simply work through the menus, 
making the following selections: 

1. Source of definitions: CP/M boot 
disk. 

2. Edit a key definition, 

3. When the editing display for no 
key shows on the screen, press Fl. 
The display should change to show 
the four values for Fl, Choose the 
option to change the normal value. 

4. Choose the assign a siring option. 

5. Choose string 11 (SCREEN 
LEFT> <SCREENLEFT> <SQ. 

6. Choose the Exit string edit — save 
assigned string option. The display 
should change to show that the 
string SCREEN LEFT> <SCREEN 
LEFT> <SC is now assigned to the 
Fl key. 

7. Press the ¥7 key. The display 
changes to show the four values for 
F7, Choose the option to change the 
normal value. 

8. Choose the assign a string option. 

9. Pick string 12 {SCREEN R1GHT> 
<SCREEN RIGHT> <SQ. 

10. Choose the Exit string edit — 
save assigned string option. 

11. Select the Done editing — exit and 
save work file option. 

12. Choose the option to save your 
work file as CURRENT definitions. 

Before we go further, let's check 
and make sure this worked. 

To the question Do you want to 
do anythifig else?, reply n. Now re- 
ply to the system A> prompt with 
DIR (or simply press F3), You'll get 
a directory listing — in 80 columns. 
Press F7 — your screen window 
should move 20 spaces to the right. 
Another F7 should take you to the 
end of the 80 columns. Press Fl 
twice — you should be back at the 
far left side of the screen. It sure 
beats scrolling four spaces at a time. 



A Permanent Change 

If you're happy with that, let's 
make it permanent. Ask for KEY- 
FIG again. When it starts, choose to 
work from CURRENT definitions. 
On the next menu, choose the Exit 
and save your work file option and 
select on CP/M boot disk as the 
place where you want your defini- 
tions saved. You should see the re- 
ply Soiling your new definitions to 
CPM + .SYS Disk. You may now exit 
the program (by answering n to the 
question Do you want to do anything 
else?). 

The changes you made should 
now be permanent. Whenever you 
boot up CP/M from this disk, the 
Fl and F7 keys scroll halfway 
across the screen with each key- 
press. Try it and make sure it works. 

If you want to assign more 
keys, repeat the process. Use KEY- 
FIG, work from the definitions on 
your CP/M boot disk, and make 
the < and > keys (shifted comma 
and shifted period) equal to string 
11 and string 12. When you've fin- 
ished, exit and save your work file 
as CURRENT. (Your changes don't 
take effect until you save them as 
part of your CURRENT system). Is 
everything working okay? If so, 
then get into KEYFIG again, work 
from your CURRENT definitions, 
and immediately exit and save your 
work file to the CP/M boot disk. 

You've made the first step to- 
wards a customized CP/M. Any 
time you boot CP/M from this disk, 
you'll be able to scroll 20 columns 
at a time using either the < and > 
keys or Fl and F7, It's only a begin- 
ning, but it is the beginning of your 
own personalized operating sys- 
tem. If there are other changes 
you'd like to make, use KEYFIG to 
add them. If you make a mistake or 
find you aren't happy with what 
you've done, you can always erase 
all your changes by going back and 
starting over with the DEFAULT 
definitions. 

It's a small change, but at least 
now you can read 80 columns on 
your 40-column monitors. And using 
the command DEVICE MONITOR 
[COLUMN = 35] should keep any 
new files you create limited to a 40- 
column format. • 



Kn][p)[Lafeg 



Beyond The Desktop: 
New Metaphors For Computers 




Fred D'Ignazio 
Associate Editor 

The Macintosh mouse/windows/ 
icons/pull-down-menus interface 
is rapidly spreading throughout the 
personal computer world. New 
computers like Commodore's 
Amiga, Atari's ST, and Apple's IIGS 
use it. With Microsoft's V^indmvs 
program, a PC can look like a color 
Macintosh; and with Berkeley 
Softworks' GEOS, so can a 64. This 
interface is becoming universal, 
even in the diverse world of com- 
puter software. Computer games, 
word processors, database pro- 
grams, and graphics programs are 
all taking on a Macintosh-like look. 

The Macintosh interface re- 
places the abstract, text-oriented 
world of older computers with a 
more visual, real-world environ- 
ment — the world of the desktop. In- 
deed, the desktop is the new look — 
the primary visual computer meta- 
phor for our imagination. Software 
and hardware manufacturers ask us 
to imagine that when we use the 
computer, we are really using an 
electronic office, complete with file 
folders, a trash can, alarm clocks, 
memo pads, calculators, and, of 
course, the desktop. 

This is a great step forward. We 
humans operate best in an environ- 
ment that's similar to something 
we've already experienced in the 
real world. Real-world environments 
have a powerful sensory, even 
emotional, appeal. We are not, after 
all, pure intellect — organic comput- 
ers. The things in life we find most 
appealing stimulate our feelings, 
our five senses, and our 
imagination. 

Only A First Step 

The metaphor of the desktop does 
this. But it's only a first step. The 
process of creating vivid, imagina- 
tive computer metaphors has just 
begun. 



But does a file folder really turn 
you on? Does a trash can tickle your 
senses? Does a memo pad set fire to 
your imagination? 

Probably not. And it was never 
supposed to. The desktop meta- 
phor came from computer design- 
ers' image of computers as business 
tools, as information processors. 
We process information at desks, 
they reasoned, so why not make a 
computer simulate a desktop? 

The computer as desktop is a 
valid, viable image. But it's only 
one image. It's dme for us to search 
out new images that relate more to 
our senses, feelings, and imagina- 
tions. Let's free computers from the 
desktop mentality and open them 
up to non-desktop thinking and ap- 
plications. This call to action espe- 
cially applies to the millions of 
computer users for whom a desktop 
is a limited metaphor, I'm thinking 
of children, artists, musicians, me- 
dia producers, teachers, I'm think- 
ing of anyone not using the 
computer strictly for filing, analy- 
sis, or data processing applicadons. 

Using new metaphors for 
human/computer interaction will 
make computers more appealing 
and easier to use. Even more impor- 
tant, if the metaphors are well cho- 
sen, they will enable us to use our 
senses^ feelings, and the powerful 
pattern-recognition parts of our 
brain to manage computer-generated 
information. Our eyes, ears, and 
other senses are highly evolved 
information processors which filter, 
switch, screen, and route billions of 
bits of sensory data to different 
parts of our brain and nervous sys- 
tem every second. Our mind is par- 
ticularly adept at generating 
patterns out of this mountain of 
sensory information. So why not 
use this ability in our interaction 
with computers? 

We need to start asking our- 
selves, what is a good metaphor for 
young children who use a com- 



puter? What about elderly people? 
Handicapped people? Artists, musi- 
cians, and craftspeople? Teachers? 
Lawyers? Writers? Engineers? 
Biologists? 

The Seagull "Finder" 

I had a conversation with award- 
winning science-fiction writer 
Orson Scott Card a few years ago. 
We talked about new metaphors for 
computer operating systems and 
what would be appropriate for 
children. 

Scott closed his eyes and 
dreamed of a child sitting at a com- 
puter. When she turned it on, a pic- 
ture of a seagull flying high over a 
blue ocean appeared on the display 
screen. The seagull was (to use 
Macintosh terminology) the "find- 
er." As the child flew her gull over 
the sea, little islands appeared with 
coral reefs, atolls, and palm trees. 
The islands were files. If the child 
wanted to access a file, she steered 
her seagull (via some pointing de- 
vice — like a mouse or a finger) to 
the island. 

This sort of imagery might 
sound inappropriate for today's 
files, which consist mainly of text 
and numbers. But it will not be out 
of place for tomorrow's files, which 
contain pictures, voices, music, 
charts, graphics, animations, and 
photographs. 

A seagull soaring over emerald 
islands is just one image, I'd like to 
see you put your imagination to 
work and dream up what meta- 
phors would be most appealing to 
you. When you sit down at your 
computer, what would you like to 
see on the screen? What images 
might work better for you than file 
folders, memo pads, and trash cans? 
Please send your metaphors to me, 
care of COMPUTEI's GAZETTE, and 
I'll share them with everyone in a 
future column. 9 



COMPUTEI's Gazeao January 1987 99 



z 



•musmit 



User Groups 



TckIcI Heimarck 
Assistant Editor 

This is the January issue, so a fair 
number of new computer owners 
are reading the GAZETTE for the 
first time. If you were lucky enough 
to get a Commodore 64 or 128 for 
Christmas, you may have already 
started to think about what soft- 
ware or hardware you'll buy next. 
But before you spend another pen- 
ny on your computer system, con- 
sider joining a user group. You 
don't have to be a computer expert 
to join, although most groups do 
have a few experts who can answer 
questions from beginners. 

User groups usually meet once 
a month. You might see a new pro- 
gram demonstrated, see a new 
piece of hardware, or hear a discus- 
sion of computer topics. You'll also 
meet other computer owners. 

Public Domain Software 

User groups have an abundance of 
public domain programs. Some pro- 
grammers choose to give up their 
copyright and release a program 
into the public domain, which means 
that it can be freely distributed. 

User groups become collection 
points for public domain software; 
some groups have hundreds or 
even thousands of programs in 
their libraries. What this means is 
that you can join a group and im- 
mediately have access to many free 
programs, some of which are gems. 

Most groups charge a nominal 
fee per disk, partially to pay for the 
computer equipment, the cost of 
the disk, and the time spent to make 
copies. Even if you can't use 18 of 
the 20 programs on one disk, a dol- 
lar or two for a couple of good pro- 
grams isn't a bad price. Many 
programs are written by the mem- 
bers themselves. Others come from 
trading with other user groups. Al- 
most all user groups have a strict 
policy against making pirated copies 

100 COMPUTErs GazetiB January 1987 



of commercial software {some will 
expel you if you're ever caught mak- 
ing copies of such programs). 

Another popular activity is the 
local bulletin board system (BBS). If 
you own a modem, you can call the 
BBS and leave messages, engage in 
games, discuss politics, or down- 
load public domain programs. 

Education And Advice 
On Buying 

If you're interested in learning to 
program, you may find a user group 
that offers classes in your area of in- 
terest, whether it's BASIC for be- 
ginners or advanced machine 
language techniques. Or there may 
be a special interest group (SIG) for 
a topic you want to investigate. 
Some SIGs get together to play ad- 
venture games; others have infor- 
mal meetings about the 128, 
graphics, music, CP/M, COMAL, 
or almost any other subject. 

Some groups have designated 
experts who have volunteered to 
help with specific programs. If you 
can't get EasyScript (a word proces- 
sor) to underline, call the EnsyScript 
expert, who might be able to give 
you the answer over the phone. 

If you're thinking about buy- 
ing a new printer or a database pro- 
gram, or just looking for a good 
game, you can get advice from 
members who have bought pro- 
grams that they either love or hate. 

Once you decide on a certain 
program, you may be able to use 
your membership in the user group 
to get a discount from a local store. 
Commodore dealers often offer 
lower prices to members of the local 
group. User groups sell disks, too. 
In lots of 1000, bulk disks can cost 
as little as 50-75 cents; user groups 
can buy a case of disks and pass the 
savings on to their members. 

The Newsletter 

In addition, you'll usually get a 



monthly newsletter. At the very 
least it will tell you what happened 
at last month's meeting and what's 
going on at the next meeting. Many 
user groups trade newsletters and 
give permission to reprint their arti- 
cles to other groups, so it's possible 
that you'll see articles from around 
the country in your local newsletter. 

Newsletters often contain new 
product reviews — you can read 
about hardware and software from 
the point of view of a user like 
yourself. Also, a review in a news- 
letter is often written by someone 
who shopped around and found 
the best price through a local dealer 
or mail-order house. 

You may also find fiction, pro- 
gramming tutorials, interesting 
(and useful) POKEs, and humorous 
cartoons or satire. Some user group 
newsletters are quite entertaining. 

A complete list of user groups 
is published yearly here in the GA- 
ZETTE; the next list will be pub- 
lished in a spring issue. If you can't 
find a group in your area of the 
country, you could start your own. 
All that's required is a group of peo- 
ple who are interested in learning 
about computers and sharing what 
they know. • 




Information Please 



Rick Nash 

This utility helps to unlock the 
mysteries of program and variable 
storage by providing you with a 
detailed analysis of how a pro- 
gram uses memory, 

"Information Please" is a tool for 
BASIC programmers. It tells you ex- 
actly how your program uses mem- 
ory. With this knowledge, you can 
learn more about how your 64 pro- 
grams work, and how to make more 
efficient use of memory when you 
program. Here's a rundown of the 
information given by the program: 

•number of program lines 

•length of your program 

•length of the variable table 

•length of the array table 

■length of the string table 

•total amount of memory available 

for BASIC use 

•total amount of memory required 

by your program 

•amount of free memory (same as 

BASIC'S FRE function) 

In order for this information to 
be useful, it's important to be aware 
of how BASIC'S tables work. Let's 
take a closer look at them. Four sep- 
arate tables coexist within the ap- 
proximately 39,000 bytes of 
memory available for BASIC pro- 
gram use. These tables are: 

•The program table. This is where 
your BASIC program resides. As 
lines are entered, this table grows 
upward towards high memory. 
■The variable table. As each new 
scalar (nonarray) variable is defined 
(as the program runs), an entryis 
made in this table. It grows upward. 
•The array table. Like the scalar 
variables, array values are entered 
as a BASIC program runs. This ta- 
ble grows upward. 
•The string table. Strings defined 
within the program area (such as 10 



A$ = "HELLO") don't need to be 
stored in a table. When strings are 
constructed dynamically (as in the 
assignment C$ = A$ -F D$), 
BASIC needs a separate table in 
which to store them. This is the 
string table. It starts at the highest 
available memory location and, 
unlike the preceding tables, stores 
information starting at the top and 
working downward. 

BASIC Tables 

start of BASIC aiea (usually $0800) 



Program table 



Scalar Variable table 



Array Variable table 



Free Memory Area 



Dynamic String table 



End of BASIC area (usually $9FFF) 

After examining the structure 
of these tables (see the figure), you 
can easily understand why vari- 
ables are cleared when a program 
line is inserted or deleted. The first 
three tables are directly adjacent to 
each other. When the program 
changes size, the variables become 
invalid. Since the values are no 
longer reliable, BASIC clears the 
variable, array, and string tables. 

We can use our knowledge of 
the structure of the tables to help 
speed up our programs. Note the 
figure. Any addidon to the variable 
table must push the array table 
higher in memory. Therefore, you 
can cut down on initialization time 
by defining all scalar variables 
before arrays. 



Asking For Information 

Information Please is a BASIC pro- 
gram that creates a machine lan- 
guage program and saves it to disk 
or tape. To use it, type in the pro- 
gram and save a copy. Since there 
are many DATA statements, which 
require accurate typing, use "The 
Automatic Proofreader," found 
elsewhere in this issue, to type it in. 
After saving a copy, run the pro- 
gram and choose whether you want 
the machine language to be saved 
to tape or disk. When the program 
finishes, a machine language pro- 
gram will have been saved to the 
device you specified. 

Let's use Information Please to 
analyze a typical BASIC program. 
Type LOAD "INFO PLEASE",8,1 
(tape users should type LOAD 
"INFO PLEASE",!, 1), then NEW. 
Now type in the following program 
(but don't run it yet): 

10 A = lSrA$ = "FIFTEEN LETTERS" 
20 A(l) = 15 
30 END 

Now type SYS 49152 to enable 
Information Please. As you can see, 
it tells you about your program 
storage. Type RUN to execute your 
program. When it ends, type SYS 
45192 again. The information is the 
same, except that BASIC has allo- 
cated storage for the scalar, string, 
and array variables. 

Information Please must al- 
ways be loaded before you load the 
BASIC program from which you 
want a report. Type SYS 49152 to 
execute it. Although you can call 
Information Please at any time, you 
must run your program first in or- 
der to see how much variable space 
it uses. Information Please uses 
memory locations 49152-49423 
($COOO-C10F)— so don't use it in 
conjunction with programs de- 
signed for the same area. 
Set' program listing on page 114. 40 



COMPUTEfs Gazette January 1987 ^a^ 







All About Loops 



Larry Cotton 

Before we get started this month, 
I'd like to talk about a weird Com- 
modore BASIC phenomenon which 
you've probably seen on your com- 
puter: quote mode. 

Quote mode can be pretty frus- 
trating, even for experienced pro- 
grammers. You know you're in it 
when you see reversed characters 
after you press the cursor keys, the 
insert key (SHIFT-INST/DEL), the 
color-change keys (CTRL or Com- 
modore plus a number), or the 
function keys. 

Let's force ourselves into quote 
mode and explore it a bit. Clear the 
screen and move the cursor to the 
center. Type a quote (a SHIFTed 2), 
then a few characters. Now press 
any of the cursor keys; SHIFT- 
INST/DEL; CTRL or Commodore 
plus a number; or a function key. 
You'll see a chain of reversed char- 
acters instead of what you expect. 
Quote mode remains in effect until 
you type a closing set of quotes or 
until you press RETURN to enter 
the current line. 

There's also a slight variation 
on quote mode called insert mode: 
Move the cursor to the center of a 
clear screen and type any word. 
Back the cursor to the middle of the 
word and press SHIFT-INST/DEL 
to open up a few spaces. Now press 
one of the cursor keys. Instead of the 
cursor behaving normally, reversed 
characters pop into the spaces. The 
same is true of the function keys and 
CTRL- and Commodoie-number 
combinations. Insert mode behaves 
like quote mode with these excep- 
tions: Insert mode affects only the 
exact number of character positions 
you opened up by pressing SHIFT- 
INST/DEL; the insert key (SHIFT- 
INST/DEL) in not affected by in- 
sert mode (it continues to open up 
spaces, rather than showing a re- 
versed character); and the delete 

102 COMPUTES Gazette January 1987 



key (INST/DEL without SHIFT) is 
affected by insert mode. 

Now that you know what 
quote and insert modes look like, 
and what causes you to get into 
them, how do you get out on those 
occasions when you enter the mode 
accidentally? You could just press 
RETURN, but that would enter the 
line into memory. A better solution 
is to press SHIFT-RETURN. This 
terminates quote mode and puts the 
cursor at the beginning of the next 
line down without entering the line 
into memory. Move the cursor up to 
where you were and resume pro- 
gramming. Commodore 128 users 
have an even easier way out. They 
can cancel quote mode by pressing 
ESC O. (That means press and re- 
lease the ESC key, and then press 
and release the O key. It won't 
work if you press the two keys si- 
multaneously.) You can also use 
ESC ESC (just press ESC twice). 

Looping With FOR-NEXT 

Now let's go back to learning 
BASIC, The next statements on the 
agenda are FOR and NEXT, which 
together form FOR-NEXT loops. 
Few programs can be written with- 
out loops — check the BASIC list- 
ings at the end of this magazine for 
firsthand proof. 

Seven items are mandatory in 
every FOR-NEXT loop. They are; 

1. the word FOR 

2. a counter (any valid numeric 
variable) 

3. an equal sign 

4. a starting value for the counter 
(any valid numeric expression) 

5. the word TO 

6. an ending value for the counter 
(any valid numeric expression) 

7. the word NEXT 

Here's a simple example program: 

10 FOR X-1 TO 500 

20 NEXT 

The first six parts of a FOR- 



NEXT loop must be written togeth- 
er on the same line; the NEXT may 
be written on the same line (with a 
colon separating it from the FOR 
part of the loop) or on another line. 

This do-nothing loop is actual- 
ly very useful for delays, which sus- 
pend a program to, say, allow the 
user to read a message on the 
screen. This loop just kills time. The 
length of the delay can be changed 
by substituting another value in 
place of the 500. Larger numbers 
yield longer delays, and smaller 
numbers give shorter delays. And 
you can use any numeric variable 
you choose as the counter; it 
doesn't have to be X. 

When you run the program, 
the computer first makes X equal to 
one. When NEXT is encountered, X 
is increased from 1 to 2, and the 
computer backtracks to the FOR 
statement. It continues looping, 
quite quickly, until X reaches 501; 
then you see the cursor again, indi- 
cating that the computer has fin- 
ished executing the program. 

Why does X wind up vrith a 
value of 501? And how do you 
know that it does? To answer the 
second question first, type PRINT X 
in immediate mode. Aha. X is 501. 
For another demonstration, type 
NEW; then try this program: 

10 FOR Z=l TO 100: PRINT Z: NEXT 
20 PRINT: PRINT Z 

This is not a delay loop. You're 
telling the computer to do a task 
(PRINT Z) before it reaches NEXT. 
When you run this program, the 
computer loops in line 10, printing 
a column of numbers in the range 
1-100 on the screen. (This program 
takes much longer than our simple 
delay program because the com- 
puter takes some time to print the 
values of 2.) 

When the NEXT is encoun- 
tered the last time through the loop, 
Z is incremented to 101 and the 
computer scoots back to the FOR 



once again. But this time, it discov- 
ers that the value of Z exceeds 100, 
and sends control of the program to 
the statement right after the 
NEXT— in this case, the PRINT 
statement in line 20, which prints a 
blank line and the value of Z again, 
which you see is 101. 

OtKer Uses For FOR-NEXT 

Any number of BASIC statements 
can be put between FOR and 
NEXT. To illustrate, hy the INPUT 
statement, which was explored last 
month. Type NEW to erase our last 
program, and type this: 

10 FOR Y=l TO 4 

20 INPUT AS 

30 PRINT Y;A$ 

40 NEXT 

50 PRINT 'THAT'S ALL!" 

This gives the computer two 
tasks between the FOR and the 
NEXT. In line 10, Y starts out as 1. 
An INPUT is asked for in line 20. 
The user types something (stored in 
the variable A$) and presses RE- 
TURN. Control goes to line 30, 
where Y and A$ are printed. (Re- 
member that the semicolon causes 

Y and A$ to be printed together on 
the same line.) Line 40 increments 

Y to 2, and the computer scurries 
back to the FOR again, which it 
finds at line 10. The loop is repeat- 
ed three more times, Y is incre- 
mented to 5, and control is sent to 
line 10 for the last time. This time, 
the computer sees that Y exceeds 4, 
and sends control past the NEXT to 
line 50, which prints the ending 
message. 

By the way, the previous value 
in A$ is overwritten each time the 
computer loops, so that if you 
PRINT A$ after the program ends, 
youTl see only the last value that 
was INPUT. 

Remember that when the 
FOR-NEXT loop has finished exe- 
cuting, the counting variable (Y in 
the case above) is always one more 
than the maximum value indicated 
in the loop. 

One STEP At A Time 

There are several other things you 
should know about FOR-NEXT 
loops. Suppose you want to incre- 
ment the counter by an amount 
other than 1. No problem. BASIC 
provides for this case with another 
statement — STEP. Or suppose you 
want to start incrementing from 



some number other than 1 — BASIC 
allows you to do this, too. 

The next few short programs 
illustrate how to use STEP. You 
don't have to type in each one if 
you understand them. But if you do 
type them in, type NEW before en- 
tering the one that follows. The 
one-liner below illustrates both sit- 
uations just mentioned. 

10 FOR U = 20 TO 40 STEP 2: PRINT U: 
NEXT 

When you run it, the numbers 
20-40 are printed in increments of 
2, starting at 20. You can even make 
the counter count backwards. Just 
set its starting value larger than its 
ending value, and make the STEP 
value negative, like this:- 

10 FOR I = 100 TO 80 STEP -2: PRINT I: 

NEXT 

STEP can be almost any num- 
ber — even a decimal— and you can 
make it and the stardng and ending 
values variables. This short pro- 
gram illustrates all of these situa- 
tions, with a loop from 1 to 3 in 
steps of .1. The spaces are used for 
clarity; they are not necessary. 

10 A = I:B = 3:C = 0.1 

20 FOR I = A TO B STEP C: PRINT I: 

NEXT 

If you want to see something 
interesting, use 2 as the upper limit 
instead of the 3 that I used. The pro- 
gram only counts to 1.9— it never 
reaches 2. Why not? It has to do 
with the way that numbers are 
stored in the computer. We interact 
with BASIC in decimal (base 10) 
numbers, but internally the com- 
puter does its math with binary 
(base 2) numbers. Sometimes 
something is lost (or gained) in 
translation. Run the program again. 
Now PRINT I. The computer an- 
swers 2. Now PRINT 1-2. The com- 
puter prints out a very small 
number. This means that the com- 
puter thinks that 1 is slightly over 2; 
that is why the loop ends prema- 
turely. Be careful when you use 
decimals for STEP values. 

A parting thought before leav- 
ing STEP: If you don't use the word 
STEP, the computer always incre- 
ments the counter upwards by one. 

Nested Loops 

FOR-NEXT loops can be nested in- 
side each other. There are many 
uses for this, as we'll see in future 
columns, but for this month, look at 



this simple case; 

10 PRINT" I"," J" 
20 PRINT 
30 FOR 1 = 1 TO 5 
40FORJ = 1 TO 3 

50 PRINT I,J 
60 NEXT J 
70 NEXT I 

Nodce how the variables I and 
J can — but don't have to — be used 
after the NEXT statement. This is 
one of the few things that are op- 
donal in BASIC, but using this op- 
tion helps the programmer (and 
anyone who's trying to understand 
the program) to see the nested 
loops more clearly. 

Run the program and leave the 
results on the screen for now. Lines 
10 and 20 print the headings 1 and J 
and a blank line. Line 30 starts the 
first counter, I. Then the second 
counter, J, is started in line 40. It ex- 
ecutes three PRINT loops before 
sending control to line 70, which 
increments I and sends control back 
to line 30. Since the J loop has fin- 
ished a complete loop, it can be 
(and is) reset to 1. In fact, J counts 
from 1 to 3 five times, as you can 
see by the results on the screen. 

Notice that nested FOR-NEXT 
loops work from the inside out; in 
the program above, the J loop is in- 
side the 1 loop. This is shown more 
clearly if the program is com- 
pressed (or "crunched," as some 
computer people prefer) into two 
lines, like this: 

10 PRINT" I"," I":PRINT 
20 FOR 1 = 1 TO 5; FOR 1 = 1 TO 3: 
PRINT I,J: NEXT I: NEXT I 

Here's a program which illus- 
trates some of the principles we've 
learned over the last three months. 

10 PRINT "{CLR}" 

20 SS = " " 

30 INPUT"CHARACTERS";C$ 

40 PRINT "{CLR}" 

SO FOR T^l TO 23: C$-S$ + C$ 

60 PRINT C$ 

70 FORD = l TO 100 

80 NEXT D 

90 NEXT T 

100 GOTO 100 

When you run it, you're asked 
to type something — anything up to 
16 characters long, SHIFTed or un- 
SHIFTed, but not reversed. 

I'll save the explanation of this 
program for next month. In the 
meantime, try to figure it out; there's 
nothing in it that hasn't been cov- 
ered in the last three columns. 

Next month we'll also look at 
IF/THEN, GOTO, and END. « 

COMPUWs GazBtte January 19B7 103 



How To Type In 
COMPUTEVs GAZETTE Programs 



Each month, COMPUTEl's GAZETTE 
publishes programs for the Com- 
modore 128, 64, Plus/4, 16, and 
VIC-20. Each program is clearly 
marked by title and version. Be sure 
to type in the correct version for 
your machine. All 64 programs run 
on the 128 in 64 mode. Be sure to 
read the instructions in the corre- 
sponding article. This can save time 
and eliminate any questions which 
might arise after you begin typing. 

We frequently publish two 
programs designed to make typing 
easier: The Automatic Proofreader, 
and MLX, designed for entering 
machine language programs. 

When entering a BASIC pro- 
gram, be especially careful with 
DATA statements as they are ex- 
tremely sensitive to errors, A 
mistyped number in a DATA state- 
ment can cause your machine to 
"lock up" (you'll have no control 
over the computer). If this happens, 
the only recourse is to turn your 
computer off then back on, erasing 
whatever was in memory. So be 
sure to save a copy of your prograjii 
before you run it. If your computer 
crashes, you can always reload the 
program and look for the error. 



When You Read: Press: 

fCLR} \^^] [CLRIFOMEJ 

{HOME J I CLRIKOMe] 

J UP} [sipr] QJcRSR^Jj 

(DOWN) |""f CRSR I j 

(LEFT) {^f^ E^'^rEl 

{RIGHT) t"^^"!! 

{RVSj [5^eJL_LJ 

{0FF( [gRi] [ "F~ I 

{BLK( [h^LIQ^^J 

{WHT! fcrirj [^2_J 

{RED! [^hj rxn 



See: 



II 

n 



Special Characters 

Most of the programs listed in each 
issue contain special control charac- 
ters. To facilitate typing in any pro- 
grams from the GAZETTE, use the 
following listing conventions. 

The most common type of con- 
trol characters in our listings appear 
as words within braces: {DOWN} 
means to press the cursor down 
key; {5 SPACES) means to press 
the space bar five times. 

To indicate that a key should 
be shifted (hold down the SHIFT 
key while pressing another key), 
the character is underlined. For ex- 
ample, A means hold down the 
SHIFT key and press A. You may 
see strange characters on your 
screen, but that's to be expected. If 
you find a number followed by an 
underlined key enclosed in braces 
{for example, {8 A}), type the key 
as many times as indicated (in our 
example, enter eight SHIFTed A's). 

If a key is enclosed in special 
brackets, % 3, hold down the 
Commodore key (at the lower left 
comer of the keyboard) and press 
the indicated character. 

Rarely, you'il see a single letter 
of the alphabet enclosed in braces. 



When You Read: 

{PUR( 
{CRN} 
(BLU) 

(yel; 

t Fl I 
( H ) 
I F3 I 
{ H ! 
{ F5 ! 
{ F6} 
( F7 } 

I ra } 



Press: 



See: 




This can be entered on the Com- 
modore 64 by pressing the CTRL 
key while typing the letter in 
braces. For example, {A] means to 
press CTRL- A. 

The Quote Mode 

Although you can move the cursor 
around the screen with the CRSR 
keys, often a programmer will want 
to move the cursor under program 
control. This is seen in examples 
such as {LEFT} and {HOME} in 
the program listings. The only way 
the computer can tell the difference 
between direct and programmed 
cursor control is the ijuoie vwde. 

Once you press the quote key, 
you're in quote mode. This mode 
can be confusing if you mistype a 
character and cursor left to change 
it. You'll see a reverse video charac- 
ter (a graphics symbol for cursor 
left). In this case, you can use the 
DELete key to back up and edit the 
line. Type another quote and you're 
out of quote mode, if things really 
get confusing, you can exit quote 
mode simply by pressing RETURN. 
Then just cursor up to the mistyped 
line and fix it. 



When You Read: 

4- 

T 



Press: 



See: 



SHIFT 



n 



For Commodore 64 Only 

{commodore I 






[c^modore] 
[commodore^ I 
[commodore 
[commodore , | 

jCOMMOUORt i 
[roMMODORE] 

{commodorF! 



3 j 
'I 

5 i 



□ 



IS 
■I 



6 I 



1CM COMPUTEfs Gazette January 1987 



Moveup to abighpsQiiigcaieer 

Servicing Gontputers 

^■^^ TF.C'ilMCAL MMUAr.S ^^ 



AfOMI UR-IIigb resolutloii. 
text &nd |{TAphk3t. 



TFXIIMCAL MAftUAr.S 
— wilh lyimplt'te specs citi 
Sany<j computer and 
profcAsioiui] proframs. 



DISCOVTJIY UR-LsiDg it 
youconslmd and lest 
drcuits like Hkm* used with 
cvmputera. 



DlfJTALLOrJC TKOBE- 
Amplifies analyring digital 
drcuitc^rolinn, 



LESSONS-Clcar. wctl lUw 
tialedloits huiW your 
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Mep-bj'slep. 




DlSKSOrWARt:- 
indudln;; MS-D0S2.il, 
BASIC WordStar, CakS«ar, 
and Eas) Write/ i. 



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linlH 



.4 




Philip I. Nelson, Assistant Editor 

"The Automatic Proofreader" helps 
you type in program listings for the 
128, 64, Plus/4, 16, and VIC-20 and 
prevents nearly every kind of typing 
mistake. 

Tjrpe in the Proofreader exactly as 
listed. Since the program can't check it- 
self, type carefully to avoid mistakes. 
Don't omit any lines, even if they con- 
tain unfamiliar commands. After finish- 
ing, save a copy or two on disk or tape 
before running it. This is important be- 
cause the Proofreader erases the BASIC 
portion of itself when you run it, leav- 
ing only the machine language portion 
in memory. 

Next, type RUN and press RE- 
TURN. After announcing which com- 
puter it's running on, the Proofreader 
displays the message "Proofreader 
Active". Now you're ready to type in a 
BASIC program. 

Every time you finish typing a line 
and press RETURN, the Proofreader 
displays a two-letter checksum in the 
upper-left comer of the screen. Com- 
pare this result with the two-tetter 
checksum printed to the left of the line 
in the program listing. If the letters 
match, it's almost certain the line was 
typed correctly. If the letters don't 
match, check for your mistake and cor- 
rect the line. 

The Proofreader ignores spaces not 
enclosed in quotes, so you can omit or 
add spaces between keywords and still 
see a matching checksum. However, 
since spaces inside quotes are almost al- 
ways significant, the Proofreader pays 
attention to them. For example, 10 
PRINT'THIS IS BASIC" will generate 
a different checksum than 10 
PRINT'THIS ISBA SIC", 

A common typing error is transpo- 
sition — typing two successive charac- 
ters in the wrong order, like PIRNT 
instead of PRINT or 64378 instead of 
64738. The Proofreader is sensitive to 
the position of each character within the 
line and thus catches transposition 
errors. 

The Proofreader does not accept 
keyword abbreviations (for example, ? 
instead of PRINT). If you prefer to use 
abbreviations, you can still check the 
line by LISTing it after typing it in, 
moving the cursor back to the line, and 



pressing RETURN, LISTing the line 
substitutes the full keyword for the ab- 
breviation and allows the Proofreader 
to work properly. The same technique 
works for rechecking programs you've 
already typed in. 

If you're using the Proofreader on 
the Commodore 128, Plus/4, or 16, do 
not perform any GRAPHIC commands 
while the Proofreader is active. When 
you perform a command like GRAPH- 
IC 1, the computer moves ever}'thtng at 
the start of BASIC program space— in- 
cluding the Proofreader — to another 
memory area, causing the Proofreader 
to crash. The same thing happens if you 
run any program with a GRAPHIC 
command while the Proofreader is in 
memory. 

Though the Proofreader doesn't 
interfere with other BASIC operations, 
it's a good idea to disable it before run- 
ning another program. However, the 
Proofreader is purposely difficult to dis- 
lodge: It's not affected by tape or disk 
operations, or by pressing RUN/ 
STOP- RESTORE. The simplest way to 
disable it is to turn the computer off 
then on. A gentler method is to SYS to 
the computer's built-in reset routine 
(SYS 65341 for the 128, 64738 for the 
64, 65526 for the Plus/4 and 16, and 
64802 for the VIC). These reset routines 
erase any program in memory, so be 
sure to save the program you're typing 
in before entering the SYS command. 

If you own a Commodore 64, you 
may already have wondered whether 
the Proofreader works with other pro- 
gramming utilities like "MetaBASIC." 
The answer is generally yes, if you're 
using a 64 and activate the Proofreader 
after installing the other ulility. For ex- 
ample, first load and activate Meta- 
BASIC, then load and run the 
Proofreader. 

When using the Proofreader vrith 
another utility, you should disable both 
programs before running a BASIC pro- 
gram. While the Proofreader seems un- 
affected by most utilities, there's no 
way to promise that it will work with 
any and every combination of utilities 
you might want to use. The more utili- 
ties activated, the more fragile the sys- 
tem becomes. 

The New Automatic Proofreader 

10 VEC=PEEK(772)+256«PE1;K(773) 
iLO=43iHI=44 



20 PRINT "AUTOMATIC PROOFREADE 

R FOR ";:IF VEC=42364 THEN 

[SPACE J PRINT "C-64" 
30 IF VEC=50556 THKN PRINT "VI 

C-20" 
40 IF VEC=35158 THEN GRAPHIC C 

LR: PRINT "PLUS/4 & 16" 
50 IF VEC=17165 THEN L0=45:ill = 

465GRAPH1C CLRtPRINT"128" 
60 SA=(PEEK(LO}+256*PEEK<HI)>+ 

6:ADR=SA 
70 FOR J=0 TO 166; READ BYT:POK 

E ADR,BYTiADR=ADR+ltCHK=C[!K 

■t-ByT:NEXT 
00 IF CHK<>2057a THEN PRINT "• 

ERROR* CHECK TYPING IN DATA 
STATEMENTS": END 
90 FOR J=l TO 5 .-READ RF.LF.HF: 

RS=SA+RF:nB=INTCRS/256)iLB= 

RS-(2 56*[iB) 
100 CIiK=CHK+RF+LF+HF SPOKE SA+L 

F.LHiPOKE SA+HF,HDtNEXT 
110 IF CHK<> 22054 THEN PRINT " 

•ERROR* RELOAD PROGRAM AND 

f SPACE 1 CHECK FINAL LINE": EN 

D 
120 POKE SA+149,PEEK(772) ;POKE 

SA+150,PEEK(773) 
130 IF VEC=17165 THEN POKE SA+ 

14,22: POKE SA+18 , 23 : POKESA+ 

29,2 24 ;POKESA+ 139, 224 
140 PRINT CHR5(147)fCHR5(17);" 

PROOFREADER ACTIVE": SYS SA 
150 POKE HI, PEEK ( HI )+l; POKE (P 

EEK(LO)+256*PEEK(HI))-1,0jN 

EW 
160 DATA 120,169,73,141,4,3,16 

9,3,141,5,3 
170 DATA 88,96,165,20,133,167, 

165,21, 133,168, 169 
180 DATA 0,141,0,255,162,31,18 

1,199,157,227,3 
190 DATA 202,16,248,169,19,32, 

210,255,169,18,32 

209 DATA 210,255,160,0,132,180 
,132, 176,136,230,100 

210 DATA 200,185,0,2,240,46,20 
1,34,208,8,73 

220 DATA 165,176,73,255,133,17 

6,104,72,201,32,208 
2 30 DATA 7,16 5,176,208,3,104,2 

08,226, 104,166,180 
240 DATA 24,165,167,121,0,2,13 

3, 167,165,168,105 
250 DATA 0.133,168,202,208,239 

,240,202, 165,167,69 
260 DATA 168.72,41,15,168,185, 

211.3.32,210,255 
270 DATA 104,74,74,74,74.168,1 

85, 2 H. ,3,32.210 
2Q0 DATA 255.162,31,189,227.3, 

149.199,202.16,240 
290 DATA 169,146.32.210.255,76 

,86,137,55,66.67 
300 DATA 68,69,70,71,72.74.75, 

77,80,81,82.83,58 
■310 DATA 13,2,7,167.31,32,151, 

116.117,151.128. 129, 167.136 

,137 - 



106 COMPUTEfs Qazme January 1987 



MLX 



Machine Language Editor 
For The Commodore 64 



»»/A 



Ottis Cowper 
Technical Editor 



"MLX" ia a labor-saving utility that 
will help you enter machine lan- 
guage program listings without error. 
MLX is rcquiied to enter all Commo- 
dore 64 machine language programs 
published in computei's gazette. 
This version of MLX was first pub- 
lished in the January 1986 issue; it 
cannot be used to enter MLX pro- 
grams published prior to that date, 
nor can earlier versions of MLX be 
used to enter the listings in this issue. 

Type in and save a copy of MLX. You'll 
need it for all future machine language 
programs in COMPUTEt's GAZETTE, as 
well as machine language (ML) pro- 
grams in our companion magazine, 
COMPUTEi, and COMPUTE! books. 
When you're ready to enter an ML pro- 
gram, load and run MLX. It asks you for 
a starting and ending address. These 
addresses appear in the article accom- 
panying the MLX-format program list- 
ing you're typing. If you're unfamiliar 
with ML, the addresses (and all other 
values you enter in MLX) may appear 
strange. Instead of the usual decimal 
numbers you're accustomed to, these 
numbers are in hexadecimal — a base 1 6 
numbering system commonly used by 
ML programmers. Hexadecimal — hex 
for short — includes the numerals 0-9 
and the letters A-F. But even if you 
know nothing about ML or hex, you 
should have no trouble using MLX. 

After you enter the starting and 
ending addresses, MLX offers the op- 
tion of clearing the workspace. The data 
you enter with MLX is kept in a special 
reserved area of memory; clearing this 
workspace area fills the reserved area 
with zeros, which will make it easier to 
find where you left off typing if you en- 
ter the listing in several sessions. 
Choose this option if you're starting to 
enter a new listing. If you're continuing 
a listing that's partially typed from a 
previous session there's no point in 
clearing the workspace, since the data 
you load in will fill the area with what- 
ever values were in workspace memory 
at the time of the last Save. 

At this point, MLX presents a 
menu of commands: 

Enter data 

Display data 

toad data 

Save file 

Quit 

Press the corresponding key to select a 
menu option. These commands are 
available onlv while the menu is dis- 



played. You can get back to the menu 
from most options by pressing 
«h™rn. ,,^^^ 

Entering A Listing 

To begin entering data, press E. You'll 
be asked for the address at which you 
wish to begin. (If you pressed E by mis- 
take, you can return to the command 
menu by pressing RETURN.) When 
you begin typing a listing, enter the 
starting address here. If you're typing in 
a long listing in several sessions, you 
should enter the address where you left 
off typing at the end of the previous 
session. In any case, make sure the ad- 
dress you enter corresponds to the ad- 
dress of a line in the MLX listing. 
Otherwise, you'll be unable to enter the 
data correctly. 

After you enter the address, you'll 
see that address appear as a prompt 
with a nonblinking cursor. Now you're 
ready to enter data. To help prevent 
typing mistakes, only a few keys are ac- 
tive, so you may have to unlearn some 
habits. MLX listings consist of nine col- 
umns of two-digit numbers^ — eight bytes 
of data and a checksum. You do not type 
spaces between the columns; the new 
MLX automatically inserts these for 
you. Nor do you press RETURN after 
typing the last number in a line; MLX 
automatically enters and checks the 
line after you type the last digit. The 
only keys needed for data entry are 0-9 
and A-F. Pressing most of the other 
keys produces a warning buzz. 

To correct typing mistakes before 
finishing a line, use the INST/DEL key 
to delete the character to the left of the 
cursor. (The cursor- left key also de- 
letes.) If you mess up a line badly, press 
CLR/HOME to start the line over. The 
RETURN key is also active, but only 
before any data is typed on a line. Press- 
ing RETURN at this point returns you 
to the command menu. After you type a 
character, MLX disables RETURN until 
the cursor returns to the start of a line. 
Remember, you can press CLR/HOME 
to quickly get to a line number prompt. 

Beep Or Buzz? 

After you type the last digit in a line, 
MLX calculates a checksum from the 
line number and the first eight columns 
of data, then compares it with the value 
in the ninth column. The formula 
(found in lines 370-390 of the MLX 
program) catches almost every conceiv- 
able typing error, including the trans- 
position of numbers. If the values 



match, you'll hear a pleasant beep, the 
data is added to the workspace area, 
and the prompt for the next line of data 
appears (unless the line just entered 
was the last line of the listing — in 
which case you'll automatically ad- 
vance to the Save option). But if MLX 
detects a typing error, you'll hear a low 
buzz and see an error message. Then 
MLX redisplays the line for editing. 

To edit a line, move the cursor left 
and right using the cursor keys. (The 
INST/DEL key now works as an alter- 
native cursor-left key.) You cannot 
move left beyond the first character in 
the line. If you try to move beyond the 
rightmost character, you'll reenter the 
line. To make corrections in a mistyped 
line, compare the line on the screen 
with the one printed in the listing, then 
move the cursor to the mistake and type 
the correct key. During editing, RE- 
TURN is active; pressing it tells MLX to 
recheck the line. You can press the 
CLR/HOME key to clear the entire line 
if you want to start from scratch, or if 
you want to get to a line number 
prompt to use RETURN to get back to 
the menu. 

Other MLX Functions 7///////// 

The Display data option lets you review 
your work. When you select D, you'll 
be asked for a starting address. (As with 
the other menu options, pressing RE- 
TURN at this point takes you back to 
the command menu.) Make sure the ad- 
dress corresponds to a line from the list- 
ing. You can pause the scrolling display 
by pressing the space bar, (MLX finish- 
es printing the current line before halt- 
ing.) To resume scrolling, press the 
space bar again. The display continues 
to scroll until the ending address is 
reached, then the menu reappears. To 
break out of the display and return to 
the menu before the ending address is 
reached, press RETURN. A quick way 
to check your typing is to compare the 
reverse video checksums on the screen 
vrith the data in the rightmost column 
of the printed listing. If the values 
match, you can be sure the line is en- 
tered correctly. 

The Save and Load menu options 
are straightforward. First, MLX asks for 
a filename. (Again, pressing RETURN 
at this prompt without entering any- 
thing returns you to the command 
menu.) Next, MLX asks you to press 
either T or D for tape or disk. !f you no- 
tice the disk drive starting and stopping 
several times during a load or save, 



COWPUTB's Gwflrta Janua/y 1987 107 



don't panic; this behavior is normal he- 
cause MLX opens and reads from or 
writes to the file instead of using the 
usual LOAD and SAVE commands. For 
disk, tht? drive prefix 0; is automatically 
added to the filename (line 750), so this 
should not be included when entering 
the name. (This also precludes the use 
of @ for Save-with-Rcplace, so remem- 
ber to give each version saved a differ- 
ent name.) MLX saves the entire work- 
space area from the starting to ending 
address, so the save or load may take 
longer than you might expect if you've 
entered only a small amount of data 
from a long listing. When .saving a par- 
tially completed listing, make sure to 
note the address where you stopped 
typing so you'll know where to resume 
entry when you reload. 

MLX reports any errors detected 
during the save or load. (Tape users 
should bear in mind that the Commo- 
dore 64 is never able to detect errors 
when saving to tape.) MLX also has 
three special load error messages: 
INCORRECT STARTING ADDRESS, 
which means the file you're trying to 
load does not have the starting address 
you specified when you ran MLX; 
LOAD ENDED AT address, which 
means the file you're trying to load 
ends before the ending address you 
specified when you started MLX; and 
TRUNCATED At ENDING ADDRESS, 
which means the file you're trying to 
load extends beyond the ending ad- 
dress you originally specified. If you get 
one of these messages and feet certain 
that you've loaded the right file, exit 
and rerun MLX, being careful to enter 
the correct ending address. 

The Quit menu option has the ob- 
vious effect — it stops MLX and enters 
BASIC at a READY prompt. Since the 
RUN/STOP key is disabled, Q lets you 
exit the program without turning off the 
computer. (Of course, RUN/STOP- 
RESTORE also gets you out.) You'll be 
asked for verification; press Y to exit to 
BASIC, or any other key to return to the 
menu. After quitting, you can type 
RUN again and reenter MLX without 
losing your data, as long as you don't 
use the clear workspace option. 

The Finished Product 

When you've finished typing all the 
data for an ML program and saved your 
work, you're ready to see the results. 
The instructions for loading the fin- 
ished product vary from program to 
program. Some ML programs are de- 
signed to be loaded and run like BASIC 
programs, so all you need to type is 
LOAD ■'fikname",8 for disk or LOAD 
"filename" for tape, and then RUN, 
{Such programs usually have 0801 as 
their MLX starting address.) Others 
must be reloaded to specific addresses 



with a command such as LOAD "file- 
name", HA for disk or LOAD "file- 
name",l,l for tape, then started with a 
SYS to a particular memory address. 
(On the Commodore 64, the most com- 
mon starting address for such programs 
is 49152, which corresponds to MLX 
address COOO.) In any case, you should 
always refer to the article which accom- 
panies the ML listing for information on 
loading and running the program. 

By tiie time you finish typing in the 
data for a long ML program, you'll have 
several hours invested in the project. 
Don't take chances — use our "Auto- 
matic Proofreader" to type in MLX, and 
then test your copy thoroughly before 
first using it to enter any significant 
amount of data. (Incidentally, MLX is 
included every month on the GAZETTE 
DISK.) Make sure ail the menu options 
work as they should. Enter fragments of 
the program starting at several different 
addresses, then use the Display option 
to verify that the data has been entered 
correctly. And be sure to test the Save 
and Load options several times to en- 
sure that you can recaU your work from 
disk or tape. Don't let a simple typing 
error in MLX cost you several nights of 
hard work. 



MLX 



For instructions on entering this listiJtg, 
refer to "How To Type hi COMPUTEVs 
GAZETTE Programs" elsewhere in this 
issue. 

EK 100 POKE 56,50!CLR:DIM It^?, 
1,J,A,B,A5,H$,A(7),NS 

DM 110 C4=4B:C6=16!C7=7:Z2=2:Z 
4=254: 25=255 s26=2S6:Z7= 
127 

CJ 120 FA=PEEK(45)+Z6*PEEK(46) 
: BS=PEEK ( 55 ) +Z6 * PEEK ( 5C 
) :H$="0123456789ABCDEF" 

SB 130 R?=CHR$(13)iL?="(LEFT!" 
:S5=" "!DS=CHR$(20) :Z5= 
CHR5(0) iTS^'Mia HIGHTj" 

CQ 140 SD=5427 2:FOK I=S1> TO SD 
+23:POKE I,0!NEXT:POKE 
lSPACE}sD-f-24,15:POKE 78 
8,52 

FC 150 PRINT" iCLR}"CHR$( 142 )ai 
R|{6):P0KE 53280, 15:P0K 
E 53281,15 

EJ 160 PRINT 'r$" {red3Irvs3 
{2 SPACES 3 i8 ei 
{2 SPACES 3 "SPC ( 2S)" 
{ 2 SPACES ) { OFF 1 I BLU ) 

X II £redJ[rvs3 

(2 SPACESj"SPC(2e)" 
[12 SPACESltBLUl" 
FH 170 PRINT" (3 DOVra} 

I 3 SPACESJCOMPUTEI 'S 
CHINE LANGUAGE EDITOR 
I 3 DOWN J" 

jB 180 print"(blk]starting add 

RESSMi"; !GOSUB300!SA=A 
DiGOSUQ1040:lF F THENIB 


GF 190 PRINT"[BLK} (2 SPACES 3 EN 
DING ADDRESSMi"; :GOSUB 
300;EA=AD:GOSUB1030:IF 
(SPACE3F THEN190 

KR 200 INPUT"i3 DOVra) {BLKlCLEA 



PG 210 



OR 220 



ML 



MA 



ED 


230 


JS 


240 


JH 


250 


HK 


260 


FD 


270 


EJ 


280 


EM 


290 


JX 


300 


KF 


310 


PP 


320 


JA 


330 


GX 


340 


CH 


3 50 



RK 360 



BE 


370 


PX 


380 


JC 


390 


OS 


400 


EX 


410 


HD 


420 


JK 


430 


SK 


440 


GC 


450 


HA 


460 


HD 


470 


FK 


480 


MP 


490 


KC 


500 


MX 


510 


GK 


520 



R WORKSPACE [Y/N]g4r';A 
$:IF LEFTS{AS,1 )<>"Y"TH 
EN220 

PRINT" (2 DOWN ItBLU] WORK 
XNG- • . "; :FORI=BS TO BS+ 
EA-SA+7!P0KE 1, 1 NEXT :P 
RI NT "DONE" 

PRINTTAB(10)"[2 DOWN} 
[BLKHRVS] MLX COMMAND 
[SPACE) MENU (DOWN 3 143": 
PRINT T$"(RVS3EtOFF)NTE 
R DATA" 

PRINT T5" [RVS3D(0FF)ISP 
LAY DATA ":P HINT T? " 
[RVS3l(OFF)OAD DATA" 
PRINT T?" [RVS3s(0FF}AVE 

FILE"tPRINT TS"[RVS1Q 
[0FF3UIT[2 DOWNlJBLKl" 
GET A5iIF A5=N5 THEN250 
A=0:FOR 1=1 TO 5:IF A5» 
M1D${"EDLSQ",I,1>THEN A 
31:1=5 

NEXT:ON A GOTO420,610 ,6 
90 , 700 , 280 iGOSUBl 060 :G0 
TO2 50 

print "(rvs) quit ":inpu 
t"[down)S43are you sure 

[Y/N]"rA5!lF LEFT$(A$, 
1)<>"Y"THEN220 
POKE SD+24,0:END 
IN?=N$ :AD=0 ! INPUTIN5 :I F 
LEN(IN5 ) 4THENRETURN 
BS=IN$ :GOSUB320 :AD=A! B? 
=MIDS(INS,3) jGOSOa320:A 
D=:AD*256+A! RETURN 
A='0:FOR J=l TO 2iAS=MID 
5(B5,J,1) :B=ASC(A5)-C4+ 
(A5>"@" )*C7:A=A*C5+B 
IP B<0 OR B>15 THEN AI)= 
0:A=-1 JJ=2 
NEXT: RETURN 

B=INT(A/C6) :PRINT MID5{ 
H?,B+l,l) ; :B=A~B*C6:PRI 
tJT MID?(H5 ,B+1,1); :RETU 
RN 

A=INT(AD/Z6) sGOSUB3 50:A 
=AD-A*Z6 ;G0SUB3 50 t PRINT 
'*."; 

CK=1NT(AD/Z6) :CK>=AD-Z4* 
CK+Z5*(CK>Z7) :GOTO390 
CK=CK*22+Z5*(CK>27)+A 
CK=CK+Z5*(CK>25) : RETURN 
PRINT" (DOWN 3 STARTING AT 
143"; :GOSUB300:IF 1N$<> 
NS THEN GOSUB1030:1F F 
[SPACE1THEN400 
RETURN 

PRINT" I RVS 1 ENTER DATA 
f SPACE3"!GOSUB400:IF IN 
S=N5 THEN220 
0PEN3,3:PRINT 
POKE198,0:GOSUD360:1F F 

THEN PRINT IN5:PRINT" 
{UP3 (5 RIGHT}"; 
FOR 1=0 TO 24 STEP 3iQ5 
= S5:P0R J=>1 TO 2:IF P T 
HEN B5=MID5(INS,I+J,1) 
PRINT"(RVS}"B5L5; sIF I< 
24THEN PRINT"(OFF}"r 
GET A5:IF A$=N? THEN470 
IF ( A? > " / "ANDA? < " : " ) OR ( A 
5 > " @ "AN DA5 t " G " } THEN5 4 
IF A$=R5 AND( (I=0)AND(J 
=1)0R F)THEN PRINT BS f : 
J=2 jNEXT: 1 = 24 tGOTO550 
IF AS = "(!iOME}" THEN PRI 
NT B?:J=2tNEXTjI=24tNEX 
T:F=0:GOTO440 
IF(A5=" {RIGHT]")ANDF TH 
ENPRINT B$L5; :GOTQ540 
IF A5<>L5 AND ASOD? OR 
( ( I=0)AND(J=l))TiIEN GOS 



10e COMPUTE!' s Gazello January 1987 



UBl06fl:GOTO470 
HG 530 A$=L?+S5+L?: PRINT B?LS; 

iJ=2-j!lF J THEN PRINT 

t SPACE] L5; : 1=1-3 
QS 540 PRINT A5,-!NEXT J: PRINT 

( SPACE ) S5 ! 
PM 550 NEXT IjpHINT!pRINT"(Uf 1 

(5 RIGHT}"; !INPUT#3, IN? 

tIF IN5»N$ THEN CIJ3SE3 t 

GOTO220 
QC 560 FOR 1=1 TO 25 STEP3:B5= 

MID? (IN?, I) ;GOSUB320:IF 
K25 THEN GOSUB380 !A ( I 

/3)=A 
PK 570 NEXT 1 IF AOCK THEN GOSU 

81060 SPRINT "fDLK J {RVSi 

t SPACE iERROR: REENTER L 

INE &4i"iF'=l:GOTO4't0 
HJ 580 GOSUB108O;B=BS-<-AD-SA:FO 

R 1=0 TO 7:POKE B+I,A(I 

) sNEXT 
QQ 590 AD=AD+8:IF AD>EA THEN C 

LOSES :PRINT"{D0WN) (BLU) 

** END OF ENTRY **{BLK) 

[2 DOWN]"iGOTO700 
GO 600 P-0 :GOTO440 
QA 610 PRINT "iCLRj (DOWN} (RVSj 

tSPACE)DISPLAy DATA "iG 

OSUB400:IF IN$=N5 THEN2 

20 

rj 620 print" {down j {blu j press: 

[rvs}space(off} to PAU 

se, (rvsjreturnjoff] to 

BREAKg4itD0WN}" 
KS 630 GOSUB360:Q"'BS+AD-SA:FOR 
I=BTO B+7!A=PEEK(I) :GOS 
UB350:GOSUB380iPRINT S$ 

CC 640 NEXTsPRINT'MRVS}") :A=CK 

!GOSUB350iPRINT 
KH 650 E^l!AD=AD+8:IF AD>EA TH 

EKPRINT"{D0HN}{BLU3** E 

ND OF DATA **":GOTO220 
KC 660 GET AS:IF A$=R5 THEN GO 

SUB1080:GOTO220 
EQ 670 IF A?'"S$ THEN F=F+l!GOS 

UBI080 
AD 680 ONFGOTO630,660,630 
CM 690 PR! NT "{DOWN) {RVSj LOAD 

(SPACE) DATA "tOP=l:GOTO 

710 
PC 700 E'BINT'M DOWN H RVSi SAVE 

(SPACE) FILE "lOP^B 
RX 710 I nS=NSi INPUT "[DOWN) FILE 

NAMEB4i"rIN?iIP 1N5-N5 

tSPACB)THEN220 
PR 720 F=«0:PRINT"tDOWN){BLK} 

{RVS)t{ OFF JAPE OR { RVS ) 

d£off}isk: Ml"; 

FP 730 GET A5:IF A5="T"THEN PR 

INT"T{D0WN} ":GOTOaB0 
HQ 740 IF AS<>"D"THEN7 30 
HH 750 PRINT"D{DOWN)"tOPEN15,6 

, 15 , "10 ! "i D=EA-SA ! IN?=«" 

s " + IN? I IF OP THEN810 
SQ 760 OPEN l,8,8,IN$+",P,W"tG 

OSUBe60:IF A THEN220 
FJ 770 AH=INT(SA/256) :AL=SA-(A 

H*256) jPRINT*1,CHRS(AL) 

;CHR5(AH); 
PE 780 FOR 1=0 TO BsPRINTIl.CH 

R5(PEEK(BS+I)) ; JIF ST T 

HEHB00 
FC 790 NEXT:CLOSEl tCL.OSE15!GffP 

0940 
GS 800 GOSU Bl 060: PRINT "(DOWN) 

(BLK) ERROR DURING SAVE: 

§41 " :GOSUBB60 ;GOTO220 
MA 810 OPEN 1,8,8,IN?+",P,R":G 

OSUB860:IF A THEN220 
GE 320 GET#1,A5,B$:AD=ASC(A5+Z 



?>+256*ASC(B5+ZS) iIF AD 
OSA THEN F=1:GOTO850 

KH 830 FOR 1=0 TO BiGET#1,A5jP 
OKE BS+I,ASC(A?+Z5) :IF 
{ SPACE JST AND(I<>B)THEN 
F=2 iAD=l!l=B 

FA 340 NEXT: IF ST<>64 THEN F=3 

FQ 850 CLOSEl :CLOSE15:0N ABS ( F 
>0)+l GOTO960,970 

SA 860 INPUT#15,A,A5;IF A THEN 

CLOSEl :CL0SE1 5 :GOSUB10 

60:PRINT"{RVS)ERROR: "A 

5 
GO 670 RETURN 

BJ 880 P0KE183,PEEK(FA+2) jPOKE 
187, PEEK (FA+3) :P0KE18a, 
PEEK(FA+4) :IFOP-0THEN92 

HJ 890 SYS 63466!lF(PEEK{783)A 
NDDTHEN GOSUB1060:PRIN 
T"{ DOWN} {RVS) PILE NOT 
{SPACE} FOUND "iGOTO690 
CS 900 AD=PEEK(B29)+256*PEEK(S 
30):IF ADOSA THEN F=l: 
GOT097a 
SC 910 A=PEEK(831J+256*PEEK(83 
2)-liP=F-2*(A<EA)-3*(A> 
EA) iAD=A-AD;GOTO930 
KM 920 A=SA:B=EA+1:GOSUB1010:P 

OKE780,3!Sys 633 38 
JF 930 A=BS:B=BS4-(EA-SA)+i:G0S 
UB10I0:ON OP GOTO950(SY 
S 63591 
AE 940 GOSUB10a0:PRINT"{BLU)** 
SAVE COMPLETED **"iGOT 
0220 
AX 950 POKE147,0iSys 63 562: IF 

( SPACE] ST <> 64 THEN970 
FR 960 GOSUB1080jPRINT"[BHJ)** 
LOAD COMPLETED **"!GOT 
0220 
DP 970 GOSUB1060:PRINT"tBLK3 

{RVSjERROR DURING LOAD: 
{DOWN) Mi": ON V G0SUB98 
, 990 , 1000 5GOTO220 
PP 983 PRINT "INCORRECT STARTIN 
G ADDRESS t ": !GOSUB360 : 
PRINT" )"!HETURN 
GR 990 PRINT "LOAD ENDED AT ";: 
AD=SA+AD : G0SUB3 60 ; PRINT 
DS: RETURN 
FD 1000 PRINT "TRUNCATED AT END 

ING ADDRESS": RETURN 
RX 1010 AH=1NT{A/2S6) sAL^A-tAH 
*256) :POKE193,ALiP0KEl 
94, AH 
FF 1020 AH=INT(B/256) !AL=B-(AH 
*256) :POKE174,AL:POKEl 
75, AH: RETURN 
FX 1030 IF AD<SA OR AD> EA THEN 

1050 
HA 1040 IF(AD>511 AND AD<40960 
)OR{AD>49151 AND AD<53 
248)THEN GOSUB1080:F='0 
(RETURN 
HC 1050 GOSUD1060 SPRINT" J RVS) 
(SPACE) INVALID ADDRESS 
J DOWN) {BLK)"sF=l:RETU 
RN 
AR 1060 POKE SD+5,31:POKE SD+6 
,208!POKE SD,240!POKE 
{SPACE)SD+1,4:P0KE SD+ 
4,33 
DX 1070 FOR S=l TO 100!NEXTiGO 

TO1090 
PF 1080 POKE SD+5,8:POKE SD+6, 
240:POKE SD,0!POKE SD+ 
1,90;POKE SD+4,17 
AC 1090 FOR S=l TO 100:NEXT:PO 
KE SD+4,0!POKE SD,0:PO 
KE SD+ 1,0! RETURN 



BEFORE TYPING . . . 

Before typing in programs, please 
refer to "How To Type In 
COMPUTEl's GAZEinrE Programs," 
which appears before the Program 
Listings. 



Medium-Resolution 
Graphics For The 
64 

See instructions in article on page 
88 before typing in. 

Program 1: Medium Resolution 
64 



C738t20 


FD 


AE 


20 


6A 


AD 


20 


AA 


25 


C740:B1 


C9 


00 


D0 


26 


8C 


3C 


03 


07 


C748i20 


FD 


AE 


20 


8A 


AD 


20 


AA 


35 


C750IB1 


C9 


00 


D0 


16 


80 


3D 


03 


98 


C7 58:20 


FD 


AE 


20 


8A 


AD 


20 


AA 


45 


C760:B1 


C9 


00 


D0 


06 


8C 


40 


03 


2E 


C768:4C 


71 


C7 


A2 


0E 


20 


37 


A4 


Al 


C7 70:60 


IB 


AD 


3C 


03 


09 


50 


B0 


40 


C77810A 


AD 


3D 


03 


09 


32 


BO 


03 


CB 


C780:4C 


86 


C7 


4C 


6B 


C7 


AD 


3C 


A7 


0758:03 


4A 


8D 


3E 


03 


AD 


3D 


03 


0E 


C790:4A 


8D 


3F 


03 


A9 


00 


85 


FD 


17 


C796!85 


FE 


AC 


3E 


03 


AD 


3F 


03 


74 


C7A0:0A 


26 


FD 


0A 


26 


FD 


IB 


6D 


E5 


C7Ae:3F 


03 


85 


FC 


A9 


00 


65 


FD 


2F 


C7B0J85 


FD 


06 


FC 


26 


FD 


06 


FC 


45 


C7B8:26 


FD 


06 


FC 


26 


FD 


A9 


04 


EB 


C7C0:65 


FD 


85 


FD 


84 


02 


Bl 


FC 


9F 


C7C8:8D 


41 


03 


38 


AD 


3C 


03 


0E 


C5 


C7D0:3E 


03 


ED 


3E 


03 


AA 


E0 


FF 


66 


C7D8iD0 


05 


A2 


00 


4C 


El 


C7 


A2 


82 


C7E0:01 


38 


AD 


3D 


03 


0E 


3F 


03 


5A 


C7E8jED 


3F 


03 


Aa 


CO 


FF 


D0 


05 


D6 


C7F0:A0 


00 


4C 


F7 


C7 


A0 


01 


A9 


46 


C7F8:7E 


Ea 


01 


F0 


0C 


C0 


01 


F0 


65 


C800:03 


4C 


14 


C8 


A9 


7B 


4C 


14 


ID 


C80B:C8 


A9 


7C 


C0 


01 


F0 


03 


4C 


22 


C810:14 


C8 


A9 


6C 


A8 


A2 


00 


AD 


57 


C818:41 


03 


DD 


10 


C9 


F0 


09 


E8 


D4 


C820!E0 


0F 


D0 


F6 


9B 


4C 


FF 


C8 


2E 


G82a:C0 


GC 


D0 


31 


A2 


7F 


C9 


7E 


87 


C8301P0 


27 


A2 


El 


C9 


7C 


F0 


21 


B9 


C836iA2 


62 


C9 


7B 


F0 


IB 


A2 


FE 


DC 


C840 5C9 


FF 


F0 


15 


A2 


FB 


C9 


E2 


Al 


0848 :F0 


OF 


A2 


FC 


C9 


61 


F0 


09 


F8 


C850:A2 


A0 


C9 


EC 


FO 


03 


4C 


FC 


8C 


C858:C8 


8A 


4C 


FF 


ca 


CO 


7B 


00 


8B 


0860:31 


A2 


61 


C9 


7E 


FO 


27 


A2 


A4 


C8681FF 


C9 


7C 


F0 


21 


A2 


62 


C9 


2D 


ce70:6C 


F0 


IB 


A2 


FC 


C9 


7F 


F0 


01 


C87811S 


A2 


EC 


C9 


E2 


FO 


OF 


A2 


13 


Ce80:FE 


C9 


El 


FO 


09 


A2 


A0 


C9 


2D 


CBSasFB 


PO 


03 


4C 


FC 


ca 


BA 


4C 


E5 


C890:FF 


ca 


C0 


7E 


DO 


31 


A2 


61 


46 


C898:C9 


7B 


FO 


27 


A2 


E2 


C9 


7C 


2F 


C8A0 ! F0 


21 


A2 


7F 


09 


6C 


FO 


IB 


3C 


C8A8:A2 


EC 


C9 


FF 


P0 


15 


A2 


FB 


ID 


C8B01C9 


El 


F0 


0F 


A2 


FO 


C9 


62 


AD 


C8Be!F0 


09 


A2 


A0 


C9 


FE 


F0 


03 


92 


C8C014C 


FC 


ca 


8A 


4C 


FF 


C8 


C0 


2E 


C8C8:7C 


D0 


31 


A2 


FF 


C9 


7B 


F0 


2C 


C8D0127 


A2 


E2 


09 


7E 


F0 


21 


A2 


34 


C8D8:E1 


09 


6C 


F0 


IB 


A2 


FB 


G9 


8F 


C8E0 17F 


Fa 


IS 


A2 


FE 


C9 


62 


F0 


10 


CBE8:0F 


A2 


EC 


C9 


61 


FO 


09 


A2 


68 


C8F01A0 


C9 


FC 


F0 


03 


4C 


FC 


C8 


FF 


ceF8:3A 


4C 


FF 


C9 


AD 


41 


03 


A4 


8C 


C900102 


91 


FC 


A5 


FD 


18 


69 


D4 


EA 


0908:85 


FD 


AD 


40 


03 


91 


FC 


60 


50 


C910I7B 


7E 


7C 


6C 


7F 


FF 


EC 


FB 


29 



COMPUTErs Gazene January 1987 109 



C918SFC Aa FE E2 El 62 6l 0C C7 
C920I0P 15 B9 13 21 00 00 00 DB 

Program 2: Medium Resolution 
Demo 

RR 100 XF=28!YF=20:X0=39:Y0=i5 

iSC=S3281 taO=532a0iF=a0 

!G-50iCF=16iAD-51000 
HQ 110 POKESC,0:POKEBO,0iGOSUB 

270SGOSUB300 
RQ 120 FORX=0TO79:Y=.!SYS AD,X 

,Y,6:Y=49iSYS AD,X,Y,6i 

NEXT 
KS 130 FORY=0TO49jXa.iSyS AD,X 

,Y,6!X=79tSYS AD,X,Y,6t 

NEXT 
AQ 140 FORI =0TO1 5 I SYS AD, 1, 1, 6 

:SYS AD, (79-1), (49-1), 6 

iSYS AD, I, (49- I), 6 
RK 150 SYS AD, (79-1), I.SiNEXT: 

FORX=16T063:Y=15sSYS AD 

,X,Y,7:y=34:SYS AD,X,Y, 

7 J NEXT 
CD 160 F0RY=16TO33:X=16;SYS AD 

,X,Y,7sX=6 3:SYS AD,X,Y, 

7iNEXT 
MM 170 PRINT" (home} ( 12 D0WK)"T 

AB(10)" JgRN]80 by 50 ME 

DIUM-RES" 
MX 180 GOSUB300!K=0!C=1:FOR2»1 

T07 : C=C+1 
BG 190 FORY=0TO49STEP5 :FORX=KT 

OK+StSYS AD,X,Y,CiY=Y+l 

1 NEXTX , Y : K=K+1 2 sNEXTZ : K 

=■6 
HH 200 FORZ=lT06:C=C+l!FORY-49 

TO0STEP-5 !F0RX=KT0K+5 sS 

YS AD,X,Y,CiY=Y-l :NEXTX 

,Y 
FE 210 K=K+12;NEXTZ:GOSUB300 
HQ 220 FORI=0TO2*J_STEPVa5 :X=X 

0+OOS(l)*XF:Y=Y0+SIN(I) 

*YFtSYS AD,X,Y,6jNEXT 
PJ 230 FORI=0TO2*isTEPl^/40:X-3 

9 . 5+COS ( I )'*'10 tY=24 .S+SI 

N(I)*8:SYS AD,X,Y,5:NEX 

T 
BQ 240 GOSUB300 
PQ 250 FORI=1TO200:X=RND(1)*F! 

Y=RND ( 1 ) *G :C=BND ( 1 ) *CF : 

SYS AD,X,Y,C:NEXT 
RH 260 GOSUB300:END 
BG 270 PRINT"{CLR] (BLU) 

(3 DOWN) (4 SPACES] AFTER 
EACH IMAGE IS DRAWN, P 

RESS" 
SC 280 PRINTTAB(10)" (DOWH)ANY 

ISPACEjKEY TO CONTINUE. 

H 

JG 290 PRINTTAB(12)" (4 DOWN}(P 
RESS ANY KEY) "(RETURN 

RQ 300 POKE198,0:WAIT198,1 £pOK 
El 98 , iPRINT " ( CLR } " I RET 
URN 



Video Setup 128 



Article ou page 78. 



DB 10 PRINT "128 SCREEN SETUP" 
BB 20 PRINT "SETS UP THE 40-CO 

L SCREEN AREA ONLY" 
AG 30 DIM S(255) 
PA 40 INPUT "DO YOU WANT A SPL 

IT SCREEN" ;Y5 
EE 50 Y5=LEFT5(y5,l) 
RQ 60 J9=1:IF Y5="N" GOTO 90 
DD 70 ja=l:J9-2:IF YS="Y" THEN 

B5=64!GOTO 90 
MG 80 GOTO 40 



4iIF J9-2 GOTO 16 

"WANT TO USE:" 

"1. CHARACTERS 

"2. HIGH RES 

"1 OR 2"fJ8 

1 OR J8>2 GOTO 10 



PICK A MEMORY BA 

VI DEO : " 
"BANK (PROGRAM 
}AREA)" 
"BANK 1 (VARIABLE 

II 

"YOUR CHOICE (0 



BQ 90 S0-1638 


GF 100 PRINT 
GA 110 PRINT 
JG 120 PRINT 
SP 130 INPUT 
FK 140 IF J8< 


DD 150 J9"J8 
EB 160 PRINT 
RX 170 PRINT 

NK FOR 
EA 180 PRINT 

{SPACE 
SJ 190 PRINT 

AREA) 
PD 200 PRINT 

R l)"r 

XD 210 INPUT B%iIF B%<0 OR B%> 

1 GOTO 160 
XF 220 PRINT 
EX 230 PRINT "PICK A MEMORY AR 

EA:" 
RE 240 FOR J=0 TO 3 
BP 250 PRINT J;" I "fJ*S0;"TO"; 

(J+1)*S0-1 
EG 260 NEXT J 
HH 270 PRINT "YOUR CHOICE (fl T 

O 3)"; 
XA 280 INPUT BsIF B<0 OR B>3 G 

OTO 220 
HS 290 IF B=0 THEN FOR J=0 TO 

[SPACE}3sS(J)=2!NEXT J 
JB 300 IF B=3 THEN FOR J»252 T 

255:S(J)=2iNEXT J 
QQ 310 REM 

CG 320 FOR J0=je TO J9 
KB 330 IF J0"1 THEN PRINT " — C 
HARACTER SCREEN — "jS=32 
JG 340 IF J0=2 THEN PRINT " — H 

1 RES SCREEN — ":S=128 
XP 350 ON J0 GOSUB 910,1020 

MS 360 INPUT "ARE YOU READY FO 

R DATA";YS 
BB 370 IF LEPT5(Y$,1)<>"Y" GOT 

O 360 
EC 380 PRINT "{CLR] [2 DOWN]" 
AE 390 PRINT "Is SPACES) VI DEO 

{SPACE] LOCATIONS ";;IF 

{SPACE}J0<>J8 THEN PRIN 

T "CONTINUED"; 
HE 400 PRINT "e"!PRINT "ALL IN 

BANK";B% 
SB 410 PRINT 
HO 420 IF BS=32 THEN PRINT "HI 

GH RESOLUTION." 
AF 430 IF B5=160 THEN PRINT "H 

IGH RES MULTICOLOR. " 
FA 440 IF J0=1 THEN PRINT "TEX 

T SCREEN" 
RR 450 PRINT "VIDEO MATRIX: "fB 

*S0+V»64 ; "TO" ; B*S0+(V+1 

G)*64-l 
RE 460 PRINT "(SPRITE POINTERS 
AT";B*S0+V*64+1016f "TO 

";B*S0+V*64+1023!" )" 
EC 470 IF J0=1 AND B3=0 THEN P 

RINT "STANDARD CHARACTE 

R SET."tC=64jGOTO 490 
HM 480 PRINT "CHARACTER BASE:" 

;B*S0+C*64; "TO";B*S0+(C 

+S)*64-1 
SH 490 PRINT 

QK 500 PRINT "** SET 'BANK 15' 
FOR FOLLOWING POKES ** 

"!IF J0OJ8 GOTO 550 
BF 510 PRINT "POKE 54534, ";MID 

5(STR5(4+B%*64),2) 
GS 520 PRINT "{4 SPACES) {TO SE 

T MEMORY BANK)" 
PF 530 PRINT "POKE 56576, ";MID 

S(STR5(7-B),2) 



HH 540 PRINT "[4 SPACES] (TO SE 

T MEMORY BLOCK)" 
DQ 550 REM 
CF 560 PRINT "POKE" ;STR$( 2603+ 

J0);", ";MIDS(STRS(V+C/1 

6), 2) 
EP 570 PRINT "(4 SPACES) (TO SE 

T VM AND CB)" 
BC 580 IP J0=1 THEN GOSUB 1360 
DH 590 IF J0OJ9 GOTO 660 
AS 600 PRINT "POKE 216,";MID5( 

STRS(B5},2) 
BQ 610 IF BS<>0 THEN PRINT " 

{4 SPACES) (TO ENABLE HI 
RES)" 
FQ 620 IF B5=0 THEN PRINT " 

{4 SPACES) (TO KILL HI R 

ES)" 
RX 630 PRINT "POKE 217,";M1D5( 

STR$(B3),2) 
MK 640 IF B3>0 THEN PRINT " 

{4 SPACES) (TO KILL ROM 

{ SPACE J CHARACTER GENERA 

TOR)" 

fx 650 if b3=0 then print " 

{4 spacesHto restore R 

OM CHARGEN, IF NEEDED)" 
GS 660 PRINT "*** PRESS ANY KE 

Y to continue **•" 

AF 670 GET YS,Y$,Y$,YS 

MC 680 GET YS:IF Y5="" GOTO 68 


KR 690 NEXT J0 
BR 700 INPUT "WILL YOU WANT SP 

RITES ";YS 
EK 710 IF Y5-"N" GOTO 800 
QJ 720 IF Y$<>"Y" GOTO 700 
HP 7 30 PRINT "SPRITES MAY BE P 

LACED AT ! " 
KQ 740 F=-l 
EX 750 FOR J=0 TO 255 
KA 760 IF S(J)=0 AND F=-l THEM 

GOSUB 850 
PC 770 IF S(J)<>0 AND FO--1 TH 

EN GOSUB 860 

RJ 780 NEXT J 

KK 790 IF Fo-1 THEN GOSUB 880 

HK 800 PRINT 

JE 810 PRINT "CAREFUL: " 

KA 820 IF B*=0 THEN PRINT "BAS 

IC IS USUALLY IN 7169 T 

O 65279" 
EE 830 IF B«=l THEN PRINT "VAR 

lABLES ARE USUALLY AT 1 

024 TO 65279" 
CM 840 END 
KP 850 P=J 
SX 860 F=0 
GQ 870 RETURN 
DJ 880 PRINT S0*B+P*64;"TO"fS0 

*B+J*64-1; "( SPRITES ";Pf 

"T0";J-1;")" 
PG 990 F=-l 
HX 900 RETURN 
DK 910 B3«4 
XG 920 PRINT "DO YOU WANT TO B 

UILD 
RJ 930 PRINT "{3 SPACES )YOUR 

WN CHARACTER SET (Y/N)" 

KJ 940 INPUT Y5:YS=LEFT5(YS,1] 

RX 950 IF Y5="Y" GOTO 990 

AE 960 IF YS<>"N" GOTO 910 

AA 970 B3=0:C=64 

BF 980 FOR J=>64 TO 127 5S(J) = 1: 

NEXT J 
BG 990 IF B3>0 THEN PRINT "THE 

CHARACTER SET MAY BE A 
T:":GOSUB 1100 
CS 1000 PRINT "VIDEO MATRIX (S 

CREEN MEMORY). .." I GOSU 

B 1250 



110 COMPUT£!s Gtaeae January 1 987 



DS 1010 
FE 1020 
HK 1030 

XR 1040 
CR 1050 

MQ 1060 
XF 1070 



.RETURN 
BS=B5+32!T=1 
INPUT "DO YOU WANT MUL 
TICOL0R"rY5 
YS=LEFT5(Y5.1) 
IF Y5="Y" THEN B5=B5+i 
2a:GCTO 1070 
IP y$<>"N" GOTO 1020 
PRINT "THE HI-RES SCRE 
EN MAY BE ATi ":GOSUB 1 
100 

PRINT "VIDEO MATRIX (C 
OLOR MEMORY) ":GOSUB 

1250 
RETURN 

K=0:FOR J=0 TO 255 STE 
P S 

FOR K=J TO J+S-1 STEP 
[SPACE) 16 
IF S(K)*T OR S[K+15)>T 

GOTO 1150 
NEXT K 

PRINT "( ",'J/S;")";B*S0 
+J*64f"TO"?B*S0+{J+S)* 
64-l!N=N+l!C=j/S 
NEXT J 

IF N<1 GOTO 1380 
IF N<2 GOTO 1210 
PRINT "YOUR CHOICE {0 
( SPACE )T0"; (J-S)/S;")" 

INPUT C0:IF C0<0 OR C0 

>C GOTO 1100 

D=C0 

C"C*S 

FOR J=C TO C+S-1jS(J)= 

3 i NEXT J 

PRINT 

RETURN 

FOR J=0 TO 255 STEP 16 

IF StJ)>T OR S(J+15)>T 

GOTO 1280 
PRINT "( "tJ/16;")";B*S 
0+J*64;"TO";B*S0+{j+16 
)*64-l IV=J/16 
NEXT J 

PRINT "YOUR CHOICE (0 
{SPACE lTO";Vf ")"; 
INPUT C0:IF C0<0 OR C0 
>\f GOTO 1290 
V=C0 
V=V* 16 

FOR J^'V TO V+15>S(J)'=3 
tNEXT J 
PRINT 
RETURN 

IF B%<>0 OR B<>0 OR V< 
>16 THEN PRINT "YOU CA 
N'T USE 'PRINT' TO THI 
S SCREEN" 
RETURN 

PRINT "AAARRRRRGHl 
{2 SPACES 3 IT WON'T PIT 
I" 
JK 1390 PRINT "I GIVE UP." 

One-Touch 
Function Keys 

See instructions in article on page 
82 before typing in. 

C000J78 A9 0D 8D 14 03 A9 C0 63 

C00Si8D 15 03 58 60 A2 00 BD C6 

C010tE9 C0 9D 00 04 E8 E0 28 18 

C018iD0 F5 A5 C5 C9 40 D0 06 87 

C02018D 11 CI 4C 31 EA CD 11 SB 

C028iCl F0 FB 3D 11 CI C9 04 E5 

C030IF0 42 C9 05 F0 2C C9 06 16 



KB 1080 

QE 1090 
GX 1100 

XQ 1110 

XP 1120 

ED 1130 
QD 1140 



HC 1150 
PS 1160 
AH 1170 
QS 1190 



XP 1190 

PM 1200 
AG 1210 
BG 1220 

MI 1230 
HX 1240 
QA 1250 
HQ 1260 

DM 1270 



CR 1280 
SE 1290 

AA 1300 

EH 1310 
BM 1320 
RF 1330 

QB 1340 
DE 1350 
JA 1360 



FG 1370 
GP 13B0 



0038 tF0 
C040:BD 
C048I04 
C050:A2 
C058tE8 
C060t31 
Ca68i77 
C070IC6 
C078il4 
0090 1 A9 
C088iA0 
C0901E8 
C098:FF 
C0A0!FF 
C0AS : 31 
C0B0:90 
C0B9iCl 
C0C0tCD 
C0CBiE4 
CaD0iC7 
C0D8:A4 
C0E0:C3 
C0E8i24 
C0F0I12 
C0F8 1 09 
C100I2D 
C10giB7 
C110t20 
0119:56 



16 C9 

12 CI 
D0 F5 
00 BD 
E0 04 
EA A2 

02 E8 
4C 31 

03 A9 
93 20 
00 20 
A0 C0 
A2 08 
20 E4 
20 E4 
D0 27 
20 E4 
BD A9 
FF F0 
C0 A9 
C0 20 
FF 20 
20 86 
20 20 

13 14 
13 01 
2D 2D 
3P 4C 
45 4C 



03 D0 

9D 77 

86 C6 

16 CI 

D0 F5 

00 BD 

E0 05 

EA 78 

EA 3D 

D2 FF 

BA FF 

20 BD 

20 ce 

FF 20 
FF 20 
20 E4 
FF AE 
20 20 
06 20 
0D 20 
CC FF 
00 C0 
Bl 2D 
86 B3 
20 20 
16 05 
0C 0F 
4F 41 
49 S3 



E5 A2 
02 Ea 
4C 31 
9D 77 
36 C6 
lA CI 
D0 F5 
A9 31 
15 03 
A9 08 
A9 01 
FF 20 
FF 20 
El FF 
E4 FF 
FF 9D 
11 CI 
D2 FF 
D2 FF 
D2 FF 
A9 0B 
4C 31 
2D 04 
2D 2D 
B6 B5 
20 20 
01 04 
44 53 
54 0D 



00 84 

Ea AD 
EA DB 
02 Bl 
4C B7 
9D 01 
86 2F 
8D 97 
58 C7 
AA 4E 
A2 55 
C0 B7 
E4 21 
F0 40 
A5 Al 

11 Ea 

20 ID 
20 3C 
4C D3 
4C 05 
20 84 
EA CC 
09 9F 
0C Aa 
2D FB 
86 CF 
20 BD 
41 F4 
00 3C 



BEFORE TYPING . . , 
Before typing in programs, please 
refer to "How To Type in 
COMPUTES's CAZHTE Programs," 
which appears before the Program 
listings. 



Connect 'Em 

Article on page 52. 

Program 1: Connect 'Em— 64 

Version 

GB 10 DIM BX(8,13),ZO(a4),ZX(4 

,4) 
CB 20 F0RA=679TO743:READB:CH=C 

H+BiPOKEA,B:NEXT 
CJ 30 FORX=0TO4:FORY=1TO4:READ 
ZX(X,Y) !CH=>CH+ZX(X,Y))NE 
XTiNEXT 
PR 40 IFCHO 6391 THENPRINT "DATA 

ERROR"! END 
GF 50 P0KE795,16 7jPOKE786,2 
HP 60 DATA 32,247,183,16 5,20,2 
01,3,176,26,7 3,3,170,189 
,255,219,41 ,15, 133,2, 169 
GF 70 DATA 15,56,229,2,170,189 
,221,2,168,169,0,32,145, 
179,96, 160,0,41 ,1 , 170,18 
9 
KX aa DATA 0,220,41,16,208,1,2 
00,169,0,32,145,179,96,0 
,1,3,0,4,9,7,0,2,5,6 
JD 90 DATA 1,40,42,81,-1,0,0,2 
,0,-1,0,80,0,1,2,62,1,0, 
80,82 
100 PRINT"{CLR]"lS=1024:C=5 
427 2:CH=81 iCL"2 !OX=46 : P 
la0,p2=0:IN$="":LX=2a:U 
X=12 
110 POKE53280,15:POKE53281, 
1:FORT=0TO3:PC5(T)-"":B 
Z?(T)=""iNEXT 
JQ 120 X=7iY=6:V=S+40*X+YrOV=V 

iPL»liOL-=46:DT5=«'"' 
ME 130 GOSUB710!lFPC5(l)<>"X"T 



AH 



GE 



HENP0KEV,CHrP0KEV+C,14i 

X=7!Y=6:GOTO150 
SQ 140 GOTO1210 
QP 150 A=USR{PL) :IFA=0GOTO210 
KF 160 1FA=1THENX=X-1 
MM 170 IFA=2THENY=Y+1 
CF 190 IFA=3THENX=X+1 
CS 190 IFA=-4THENY=Y-1 
GA 200 GOTO260 
AP 210 B=USR(PL+2) iIFB=0GOTO15 


MP 220 IFOL=66GOTO690 
HH 230 IFOL<>46THENGOSUB1440:G 

OTO150 
SK 240 GOSUB1460IIFD1-0THEND1" 

ViGDTO150 
HB 250 D2=VtGOT036a 
PM 260 IFX<7THENX=7 
KA 270 IFX>21THENX=21 
XP 280 IPY<6THENY=6 
RK 290 IFY>LXTHENY=LX 
PC 300 V=S+40*X+Y 
HX 310 IFPCS(PL)="X"THENOL=0X: 

OC=OY 
QH 320 P0KEOV,OL:POKEOV+C,OC 
XA 330 OL=PEEK(V) !OC=PEEK{V+C) 

iPOKEV.CH iPOKEV+C, 14jOV 

=V:OX=OL 
XH 340 IFPC5(PL)<"X"THEN0Y=0C 
GK 350 GOTO150 
JF 360 AA=Dl:BB=D2:BX5 = ''"!lFDl 

<D2GOTO390 
JJ 370 A=D1:D1=D2 tAA=D2:D2=A 
MM 380 E='D2-D1:IFE=2THENDI5""A 

":GOTO410 
SM 390 IPE=80THENDI5--D"iGOTO4 

70 
KH 400 GOSUB1440tD2<=0:Dl-0iGOT 

0150 
EF 410 E=PEEK(AA+1) !lFE=lllGOr 

0400 
CS 420 POKEDl+l.lll 
RD 430 IFPC5{PL)=""GOTO560 
DD 440 GOSUB1540 
JS 450 P0RE=lT08iP0KEDl+l,32!F 

ORK=lT050:NEXTiPOKEDl+l 

, 111 tF0RK=lTO75 iNEXT 
CD 460 NEXTiGOTOB60 
HQ 470 E=PEEK(AA+40) !lFE=66GOT 

0400 
KQ 480 POKEDl+40,66!POKEDl+40+ 

C , 2 ! P0KED2 , 66 : POKED2 +C , 

2 1 IFPC5 ( PC)= "X"GOTO540 
DC 490 IFPCS(PL)=""GOTOS40 
HH 500 GOSUB1540iIFV=D2THENOX= 

66 :0Y=2 
EB 510 FORE=lTO8iPOKEDl+40,32i 

P0KED2 , 32 :FORK=1TO50 iNE 

XT ! POKED! +40,66 :P0KED2 , 

66 
QS 520 POKEDl+40+C,2!POKED2+C, 

2 
FD 530 F0RK=lT07S!NEXTiNEXT 
MQ 540 IF0V='D2ANDPL-1THEN0X=66 

t0Y=2 
HH 550 IFOV=D2THENOL=66 iOC=2 
JC 560 XX=AA-S!FORK'-1T021:XX=X 

X-40jYY=XX:1FYY<40THENX 

X=K:K=21 
AF 570 NEXT 
CB 580 ROW=(XX-7)/2 + l:COL=.(YY- 

6)/2+l 
JM 590 BX(RO,CO)=BX(RO,CO)+liT 

Y5--N" 
BQ 600 IFBX{RO,C0) = 4THEfIBXS-"X 

"jGOSUB1480!GOSUB88B!GO 

SUB950 
CP 610 IFDIS="A"THENBX{R0W-1 ,C 

OL) =BX ( R0W~1 , COL ) +1 :TY$ 

="A":IFBX{RO-l,CO)=4GOT 

O650 
KE 620 IFDI5='"A"GOTO660 



COMPUTEfs Gazme January 1987 1 1 1 



PE 630 BX(R0W,C0L-1 )=BX(R0W,CO 

L-l)+l !TY5="D" 
GH 640 IFBX{RDW,C0L-1 ) <>4Gar06 

60 
BP 650 BX$="X":GOSUB1480:GOSUB 

aB0:GOSUB950 
JQ 660 DJ=0!D2=0:IFBXS=""THENP 

L=PL+1:GOSUO950 
ME 670 IFPC5[PL) = "X"GO'rO1210 
AD 680 POKEV.CHjPOKEV+C, 14:0V= 

V:GOTO150 
J A 690 F:=X:FORK=.1T09:E=E-2 :IFE 

= 0THENGOSUB1.440 tGOTOI 50 
GK 700 NEXT:GOTO240 
JK 710 PRINT"(CLR1":PHINTTAU{S 

)"(RVS)|3i WELCOME TO C 

ONNECT'MM ": PRINT : PRINT 

JGOSUI31480 
iiP 720 TS = H4:GOSUU1460 
PX 730 PRINT" (BLUjTO PLAY THE 

{ SPACE JCOMPUTER, ENTER 

(SPACE )i33C-64" 
ER 740 PRINT" [BLU) FOR EITHER O 

R UOTH PLAYER'S NAMES.. 

" : PRl NT ! P R t NT : F0RT=1 T02 

500: NEXT 
EH 750 FORI = 1 T02 :GOSUBl 460: PRI 

NT"(BLU)WilAT IS PLAYER 

{SPACE}#"I"[LEn'] 'S NAM 

EE33"; :INPUTPLS(I) 
JM 760 PL5(I) = LE['T?(PL?<1>,8) : 

NEXT 
ES 770 PRINT:GOSUB1460:Fl=-) :F 

2=0:PRINT;FORT=1TO2:Z5= 

LEt'r5(PI,5CT), 1 ):A=ASC(Z 

5) 
RJ 780 KL(T)=A-64;Fl-Fl+4 :NC(T 

)=Fl :IFPL5(T)="C-64"THE 

NF2=F2+l jPC$tT )="X" 
FQ 790 IFr=2ANDF2 = 2TiiBNPL?{T} = 

"COMMODORE" 
BB 800 PRrNT"B33(2 SPACES}" ;PL 

?(T) ;" IbLU] will use JO 

YSTICK";T!NEXT 
CX 810 L%=LEN(PL5( 1 )) :M%=LEN{P 

L5(2)) iL%=(L*/2)+7:M%={ 

M%/2)+23 
RF 820 PRINT:PRINT!PRINT"jBLU) 

REGULAR OR MINI GAME (R 

/M)7" 
MG 830 GET2S:IFZS = "R"GO'ro860 
DD 840 IFj;$<>"M"GOTO830 
QF 850 LX=I8!UX=7!TS=42 
MX 860 FORX=lTOUX!DT5=DT$+". " 

:NEXT 
GG 870 GOSUB14a0:GOSUB95O!RETU 

RN 
QR 880 IFry5="N"THENAA=R0:BB=C 

O 
US 890 IFrY?="R"THENAA=RO-l :BB 

=C0 
MP 900 IFTyS="D"THENAA=RO;BB=C 

O-l 
FE 910 A={AA*2+7j-2tB=QB*244 :E 

=S+A*40+B+41 
Si! 920 AA=FL(PL) :CL=NC(PL) 
GS 930 POKES, AA+1 28 :POKEE+C,CL 

:CL=2: RETURN 
QM 940 PRINT" [home) •':FORJ=1TOC 

C : P RI NT : NEXT : RETURN 
AM 950 IF1N5=""THENBX$="":PRIN 

T'MCLRJ" 
MC 960 PRINT" {home} ":PRIKTTAB{ 

9)" [RVS} IBLU) CONNECT 'E 

M SCOREBOARD " jPRIKT 
KB 970 IFBX?<>"X"GOTO1000 
XP 980 IFPL=1THENP1=P1+1*GOT01 

000 
QG 990 P2=P2+l:PL=2 
FG 1000 PRINTTAB(8)" [RVSHCYN) 
■' +PL5 (I ) r TAB ( 24 ) " [ RVS ] 
[ YEL1"+PL5(2) :IFPL>2TH 



ENPL=1 
RQ 1010 PRINTTAB(L%)"i3i"rPl;T 

AB(M%}P2 
AE 1020 POKE781,6:SYS59903:NA? 

=PL?(PL) :POKE646,NC(PL 

) 
MR 1030 PRINTiPRINTTAB(4)NRS;" 
'S TURN"!lFPC?(PL)=""T 

[1ENGOSUB1460 
QG 1040 IFIN?<>""GOTO1070 
PR 1050 IN5="X"!CC=6 JGOSUB940 
PS 1060 FQRX=IT08:PRINTTAB(6)" 

lRED}";DT?:PRINT:NEXT: 

TI5="000000" 
KH 1070 GOSUB1200 
BA 1080 A=Pl+P2iIFA=TSGOTO1100 
QE 109 RETURN 
RD 1100 WN5=" WINSI 1 ":NAS=PL5( 

1 ) +WN$ :IFP2=P1THENNA5= 

"IT'S A TIEl l":G0T0112 


MB 11.10 P0KE646,NC(.l) :IFP2>P1T 

HENNA$ = PL? ( 2 ) +WN5 : POKE 

546,NC(2) 
FG 1120 CC=22!GOSOB940 
QR 1130 FORX=lT07:POKE7ei,22:S 

YS59903 :GOSUB1480 :PRIN 

TTAB(12)"[UP]"rNAS 
MP 1140 FORY=1TO3 00;NEXT:NEXT 
JK 1150 PRINTTAB(7)"B33CARE TO 

PLAY AGAIN (Y/N)?" 
SB 1160 GETZ?:IFZ?=""GOTO1160 
RS 1170 IFZS = "K"TliENEND 
GS 1190 IFZ5<>"Y"THENGOTO1160 
ME 1190 F0RA=1T07:F0RB=1T01 2:B 

X(A,B)=0:NEXT:NEXTiDl= 

01 D2=0:GOTO100 
DX 1200 PRINT" {HOME )":PRINT" 

[PURi";LEFT5(Tl5,2};": 

•;MID5(TIS,3,2) ; ":";RI 

GHT5(TIS,2) ! RETURN 

DM 1210 NZ=0:VA=-1:NX=0:GOSUB1 

510 
AC 1220 VA=VA+1jNL=VA+1 
D!l 1230 IFBZ5(VA) = "X"GOTO1220 
MG 1240 F0RA=1T07:F0RB=1T0UX-1 
KM 12 50 IFBX(A,B)=3THENNZ=0iNL 

=4 :NX=0 iGOSUBl 380 :A=7 i 

B=UX-l!GOTO1270 
DE 1260 IFBX(A,B)=VATHENGOSUBl 

380 
EK 1270 NEXT!NEXT:NX=0!lFNZ>0G 

OTO1290 
JP 1280 aZS(VA)="X"tGCITO1220 
QJ 1290 R=INT(BND{l)*NZ)+ltIFN 

X=NZTHENNZ=0 :GOT01 220 
KJ 1300 IFZO(R)=99GOTO1290 
CQ 1310 NX=NX+l!L0C=20(R) 
DJ 1320 P0R2=1T04;RX?{Z)=""!NE 

XT : RX=0 
PK 1330 IFRX=4THENZO(R)-99!GOT 

01290 
DM 1340 Z=INT(RND(1)*4)+1:IFRX 

5{Z)-="X"GOTO1340 
XD 1350 RX=RX+1 :RX5(Z)="X" 
JX 1360 E=PEEK(LOC+ZX(0,Z)) JIF 

E=32THENGOSUB1390:GOTO 

1420 
JG 1370 GOTO1330 
FX 1380 E={A*2+7)-2!K=B*2+4:LO 

C=S+E*40+K:NZ=NZ+1 : ZO ( 

NZ)=L0C! RETURN 
SJ 1390 XX=LOC-S!F0RK=l'l'O21 :XX 

-XX-40iYY=XX!lFYY<40TH 

ENXX=K:K=21 
CJ 1400 NEXT 
RS 1410 ROW=(XX-7)/2+l:COL=(yY 

-6) 72+1: RETURN 
GM 1420 IFBX(HOW+ZX(Z,l),COL+Z 

X(2,2) }<NLTHEND1=L0C+Z 

X ( Z , 3 ) : D2=L0C+ZX { Z , 4 ) : 

GOTO360 



GM 1430 GOTO1330 

MQ 1440 GOSUB15 70!POKEC^-5,45:P 

OKEC+6 ,165: POKEG+4 ,33: 

POKEC+1 , 6 : POKEC , 5 
SF 1450 F0RT=1T02 00! NEXT: POKEC 

+4,3 2:POKEC+l ,0: POKEC, 

0! RETURN 
EE 1460 GOSU[)15 70!POKEG+5,0!PO 

KHC+6,2 47!PQKEC+4 , 1 7 
KG 1470 POKEC+1,40:PQKEC,0;FOR 

T=lTO100:NEXT:POKEC+4, 

16: RETURN 
EF 1480 GOSUB1570:POKEC+5,0:PO 

KEC+6 ,255: POKEC+4 , 2 1 
FF 1490 POKEC+15,40!FORA=1TO4: 

F1=20:FORB=1TO2 :F2=100 

f POKEC+1 ,F1 !F0RK=1T02 
S.J 1500 POKEC+15,F2:FI = t'l *1 .05 

!F2=F2*.9:NEXTK:NEXTB! 

N EXTA t POKEC+6 ,15: RETUR 

N 
CR 1510 GOSUB1570:POKEC+5,6!FO 

RZ=1T015 
PE 1520 A=INT(]0*RND(1))+1 !Q=I 

NT( 25*RND( 1 ) ) +1 :POKEC+ 

1 ,40:F2=.INT(15*RND(1)) 

-•■1 
JJ 1530 POKEC+15,F2!POKEC+4,23 

! FORT=l TOQ :NEXT ! POKEC+ 

4 , 1 28 : NEXTZ : RETU RN 
XK 1540 GOSUB15 70:POKEC+S,8!PO 

KEC+6,255:POKEC+4,2 3 
KD 1550 POKEC+15,40:FORZ=.1TO4: 

FORFl=25 5TO0STEP-6 :POK 

EC+1 ,F1 :NEXTF1 
XK 1560 FORF1=0TO2 5 5STEP10:POK 

EC+1,F1 sNEXTFl iPOKEC+6 

,10! RETURN 
JS 1570 FORL=CTOC+23:POKEL,0!N 

EXT: P0KEC-»-2 4,15: RETURN 

Program 2: Connect 'Em— 128 
Version 

(Refer to the article for modifications 
needed to use this version with the 
Plus/4 and 16.) 

GB 10 DIM BX(8, 13), 20(84), ZX(4 

,4) 
FX 20 FOR X=0 TO 4:F0R Y=l TO 

{ SPACE )4!READ ZX(X,Y):CH 

=CH+ZX(X,Y) : NEXT: NEXT 
DM 30 IF CH0 492 THEN PRINT "DA 

TA ERROR": END 
SS 40 DATA 1,40,42,61,-1,0,0,2 

,0,-1,0,80,0,1,2,82,1,0, 

80,82 
JX 50 BANK15:PRINT"{CLR)":S=10 

24!C=5427 2:RR=2 35:CC=241 

!CH=81 :CL=2:OX=46!P1=0:P 

2=0!lN5="":LX=28:UX=12 
KQ 60 COLOR 4,2,5 :C0LOR 0,2 :F0 

R T=0 TO 3 :PC$(T)=""iB2S 

(T)=""!NEXT 
DR 70 X=7:Y=6:V=S+40*X+Y:OV=V: 

PL=l!OL=46:DT?="" 
KX 80 GOSUD 660! IF PC?(1)<>"X" 
THEN POKE V,CH:POKE V+C 

,14:X=7!Y=6:GOTO 100 
RD 90 GOTO 1170 
GC 100 A=JOY(PL):IF A=0 THEN 1 

00 
XR 110 IF A>127 THEN 170 
MG 120 IF A=l THEN X=X-1 
at 130 IF A=3 THEN Y=Y+1 
CH 140 IF A=5 THEN X=X+1 
MK 150 IF A=7 THEN Y=Y-1 
DP 160 GOTO 210 
JM 170 IF 0L=66 THEN 640 
KF 180 IF 0LO46 THEN GOSUB 14 
00IGOTO 100 



112 COMPUTErs Gstette January 1987 



FK 190 GOSUB 1410 ::P Dl-0 THEN 

Dl^ViGOTO 100 
JK 200 D2=V:GOT0 310 
XG 210 IF X<7 THEM X=7 
CQ 220 IFX>21 THEN X=21 
DE 2 30 IF Y<6 THEN Y-6 
KF 240 IF Y>LX THEN y«LX 
EA 250 V»S+40*X+Y 
SR 260 IF PC5(PL)""X" THEN 0L= 

OX !OC"OY 
HF 270 POKE OV,OL:POKE 0V+C,OC 
GD 280 OL=PEEK(V) sOC=PEEK(V+C) 

iPOKE V,CH:POKE V+C,14: 

OV=V:OX=OL 
KM 290 IF PCS(PL)<"X" THEN 0Y= 

OC 
BC 300 GOTO 100 
HC 310 AA=D1 !BB=D2;BX5=""!lF D 

KD2' THEN 330 
ER 320 A=D1 iDl=D2iAA=D2!D2-A 
KB 330 E=D2-D1:IF E=2 THEN DI$ 

="A";GOTO 360 
KG 340 IF E=80 THEN DI5="D":G0 

TO 420 
QE 350 GOSUB 1400 :D2=0 :Dl-0iGO 

TO 100 
HD 360 E=PEEK(AA+1) !lF E-111 T 

HEN 350 
FR 370 POKE D,l+l,lll 
RK 3S0 IF PCS(PL)=>"" THEN 510 
BA 390 GOSUB 1470 
EC 400 FOR E=l TO 8;P0KE Dl+I, 

32iF0R K=l TO 50:NEXT:P 

OKE D1 + 1,111:F0R K='l TO 
75:NEXT 
BP 4J0 NEXT 1 GOTO 510 
HM 420 E=PEEK(AA+40) iIF K=66 T 

HEN 350 
QJ 430 POKE 01+40,66 I POKE Dl+4 

0+C,2rPOKE D2,66:POKE D 

2+C,2!lF PC5{PC)="X" TH 

EN 490 
DF 440 IF PC$(PL)="" THEN 490 
FP 450 GOSUB 1470 :IF V=D2 THEN 

OX=66:OY=2 
DC 460 FOR E=l TO SsPOKE Dl+40 

,32iP0KE D2,32 iFOH K=l 

{SPACE] TO 50:NEXT3POKE 

( SPACE] Dl +40, 66: POKE D2 

,66 
DR 470 POKE Dl+40+C,2!POKE 02+ 

C,2 
QG 430 FOR K=l TO 75:NEXT:NEXT 
FM 490 IF OV=D2 AND PL=1 THEN 

t SPACE lOX=66!0Y=2 
CP S00 IF 0V=D2 THEN OL=66 :OC= 

2 
QG 510 XX»AA-StFOR K=l TO 21 :X 

X=XX-40:YY=XX:IF yY<40 

(space] THEN XX=K:K=21 
EB 520 NEXT 

GF 53 R0W=(XX-7)/2+l!COL=(YY- 

6)/2+l 
MP 54 I3X(R0W, COL) = aX(BDW, COL) 

+ 1 !TYS = "N" 
EG 550 IF iiX( ROW,COL) = 4 THEN B 

XS="X":GOSUB 1420:GOSUB 
840!GOSUB 910 
HS 560 IF DIS="A" THEN BX(ROW- 

;,C0L) = BX(R0W-1 ,C0L)+1: 

TY5="A":IP BX(R0W-1,C0L 

)=4 THEN 600 
HB 5 70 IF DI5="A" THEN 610 
AM 580 BX(ROW,COL-1)=BX(ROW,CO 

L-l)+l :TYS="D" 
JD 590 IF BX(R0W,COL-U<>4 THE 

N 610 
BS 600 BX5="X"!G0SUB 1420:GOSU 

B 840:GOSUB 910 
RS 610 D1=0:D2=0!IF BX5="" THE 

N PL=PL+1 jGOSUB 91.0 



BC 620 IF PC$(PL)="X" THEN 117 


PA 630 POKE V.CHtPOKE V+C,14!0 

V=V!GOTO 100 
SF 640 E=X:FOR K=l TO 9:E=E-2: 

IF E=0 THEN GOSUB 1400; 

GOTO 100 
GS 650 NEXTiGOTO 190 
AE 660 PRINT" [CLR)"i PRINT TAB ( 

B)" (RVSjlRED] WELCOME T 

O CONNECT'EM "!PRINT:PR 

INTjGOSUB 1420 
BD 670 TS=84rGOSUB 1410 
HB 680 PRINT "IBLOJTO PLAY SGAI 

NST THE COMPUTER, "jPRIN 

T"ENTER tREDjC-128lBLUj 
FOR" 
MA 690 PRINT'"EIT[!ER OR BOTH PL 

AVER'S NAMES. ■ "sPRINTiP 

RINTiFOR T=l TO 2500!NE 

XT 
MG 700 FOR H=l TO 2 :GOSUB 1410 

SPRINT" {BLUjWH AT IS PLA 

YER *"H"£LEFr]'S NAME 

[RED]"; ilNPUT PL5(H) 
PB 710 PL?<H)=LEFT5(PL5(H],8) 1 

NEXTtPRINTiPRINTiGOSUB 

i SPACE] 1410 I Fl-3iF2=0 
DG 720 PRINT: FOR T=l TO 2!F1=F 

1+1 !NC(THF1 
PQ 730 NC(T)=F1+16*4:IF PL$(T) 

="C-128" THEN F2=F2+1:P 

C?(T)="X" 
BJ 740 IF T=2 AND F2=2 THEN PL 

5(T}="COMM0D0RE" 
XH 750 Z5"LEFTS(PL$(T),1) >A=AS 

C(Z5) tPL(T)-A-64 
DD 760 PRINT"£RED] [2 SPACES)"? 

PL?(T) ;" fBLU] WILL USE 

[ SPACE] JOYSTICK"jT!NEXT 
BR 770 L%=LEN(PLS(1)) :HI=LEN{P 

LS(2)) :L%=(L%/2)+7!M%=( 

M%/2)+23 
MH 780 PRINT:PRINTjPRINT"{BLU] 

REGULAR OR MINI GAME (R 

/M)7" 
KK 790 GET Z5jIF ZS="R" THEN 8 

20 
DP 800 IF Z5<>"M" THEN 790 
QA 810 LX=18!UX=7)TS=42 
MC 820 FOR X=l TO UX:DT5=DTS+" 

. " : NEXT 
DC 830 GOSUB 1420tGOSUB 910: HE 

TURN 
FF 840 IF TY$='"N" THEN AA=ROWt 

BB=COL 
QH S50 IF TY5="A" THEN AA=ROW- 

1 !BB=COL 
XJ 860 IF TY5="D" THEN AA=ROW: 

BB=C0L-1 
CC 870 A=(AA*2+7)-2 :B=BB*2+4!E 

=S+A*40+B+41 
RF 8B0 AA=FL(PL) tCL"NC(PL) 
DQ 890 POKE E,AA+12aiP0KE E+C, 

CL!CL=2: RETURN 
MG 900 PRINT" [HOME) ":FOR J=l T 

O CI iPRINTt NEXT J RETURN 
AR 910 IF IN5="" THEN BX5="":P 

RINT"(CLR]" 
MB 920 PRINT" ]H0ME]": PRINT TAB 

[9)" {RVSjfBLU] CONNECT' 

EM SCOREBOARD "iPRINT 
iiG 930 IF BX5<>"X" THEN 960 
RQ 940 IF PL=1 THEN Pl=Pl+l!GO 

TO 960 
QD 950 P23P2+l!PL=2 
ER 960 PRINT TAB C8} " {RVS ] (PUR ) 

"+PL?(1);TAB(24)''{RVS] 

{GRN]"+PL5(2) !IFPL>2 TH 

EN PL=i 
KP 970 PRINT TAB(L%)" {PURJ";P1 

;TAB(M%)"tGRNj"P2 



PK 980 POKE RR, 5 I PRINT t FOR I"l 

TO 20SPRINT'' ";!KEXT:N 
A5=PL5(PL} iPOKE CC,NC(P 
L) 
HC 990 PRINT:PRINT"{UP3 ''TAB(4) 
NA5;"'S TURN''jIF PC5(PL 
) = '"'THEN GOSUB 1410 
FC 1000 IF IN5<>''" THEN 1030 
KM 1010 IN5="X"jCl=6:GOSUB 900 
XB 1020 FOR X=l TO 8:PRIHT TAB 

(6)" (RED J ";DT?:PRINTiN 

EXT:TI5="000000" 
AH 1030 GOSUB 1160 
MK 1040 A=P1+P2:IF A=TS THEN 1 

060 
AD 1050 RETURN 
BX 1060 WN$=" HINSl l"!NA5=PL?( 

l)+WN$iIF P2=P1 THEN N 

A?="IT'S A TIEll'iGOTO 
1080 
PP 1070 POKE CG,NC(1):IF P2>P1 
THEN NA? =PL5 < 2 ) +WN$ ! P 

OKE CC , NC ( 2 ) 
SM 1080 Cl=22:GOSUB 900 
FA 1090 FOR X=l TO 7:P0KE RR,2 

liPRINTsFOR 1=1 TO 25t 

PRINT" "i tNEXT:PRINTtG 

OSUB 1420 
RX 1100 PRINT TAB(12}" [UP] ":NA 

S:FOR Y=l TO 300 :NEXT: 

NEXT 
CQ 1110 PRINT TAB(7)" {RED]CARE 
TO PLAY AGAIN {Y/N)7" 
AK 1120 GET Z?!lF Z$="" THEN 1 

120 
BK 1130 IF Z¥="N" THEN END 
DB 1140 IF Z$<>"Y" THEN 1120 
RF 1150 FOR A=l TO 7 :FOR B=l T 

O 12;BX(A,B)=0!NEXT!NE 

XT:Dl=0sD2=0:GOTO 50 
PS 1160 PRINT" {HOME J" jPRINT" 

lP0R]";LEFT?(TIS,2) ;": 

";MID5(TI5,3,2} r":";RI 

GHT?(TI5,2) : RETURN 
CJ 1170 NZ=0iVA=-l :NX=0:GOSUB 

(SPACE]1440 
KQ 1180 VA=VA+1 :NL=VA+l 
HX 1190 IF BZS(VA)="X" THEN 11 

80 
FP 1200 FDR A=l TO 7; FOR B= I T 

UX-1 
PE 1210 IF BX(A,B)=3 THEN NZ=0 

:NL=4:NX=0:GOSUB 1340: 

A=7:Q=UX-1 jGOTO 1230 
AS 1220 IF BX{A,B)=VATHEN GOSU 

B 1340 
XQ 1230 NEXT:NEXT:NX=0;IF NZ>0 

GOTO 1250 
KH 1240 BZ5CVA)="X":G0T0 1180 
CH 1250 R=INT(RND(1)*NZ)+1:IF 

[ SPACE ]NX=N2 THEN NZ=0 

iGOTO 1180 
AS 1260 IF ZO(R)=99 THEN 1250 
MC 1270 NX=NX+l!L0C=ZO(R) 
QG 1280 FOR Z=l TO 4!RXS(Z)="" 

!NEXT;RX=0 
JA 1290 IF RX=4 THEN ZO(R)=99: 

GOTO 1250 
PQ 1300 Z=INT(RHD(1)*4)+1 tIF R 

X?(Z)="X" THEN 1300 
PA 1310 RX=ra+,l iRX5(Z)="X" 
EK 1320 E=PEEK(LOC+ZX(0,Z)) jIF 
E=32 THEN GOSUB 1350: 
GOTO 13B0 
EK 1330 GOTO 1290 
BQ 1340 E=(A*2+7)-2 :K=B*2+4:LO 

C=S+E*40+K;NZ=NZ+1:ZO( 
NZ)=LOC: RETURN 
CR 13 50 XX=LOC-S:FOR K=l TO 21 

!XX=XX-40tYY=XXtIF YY< 
40 THEN XX=K!K=21 
MH 1360 NEXT 



COMPUTEt's Qazotte Ja/iuary 1987 113 



FX 1370 ROW-()OC-7)/2+l:COL=(YY 

-6)/2+l!RETURN 
QE 1380 IF BX(R0W+ZX(Z,1),C0L+ 

ZXt2,2))<NL THEN D1=L0 

C+2X ( Z , 3 ) ! D2=L0C+ZX { Z , 

4) rGOTO 310 
GQ 1390 GOTO 1290 
PG 1400 VOL BiSOUND l,0,lfl:RET 

URN 
JF 1410 FOR 1=5 TO STEP-1 iVO 

L 1: SOUND 2,929,10:NEX 

T: RETURN 
DH 1420 VOL 5: SOUND 2,97 9,2 5FO 

R A=l TO 4!F1=850;FOR 

(SPACE)B=1 to 2!F2=102 

2: SOUND l,Fl,2iF0R K=l 
TO 2 
QS 1430 SOUND 2,F2,2 iFl-Fl*1.0 

5iF2=F2*.9iNEXT K.B.As 

RETURN 
EF 1440 FOR Z=l TO 15!A=INT(ia 

*RND(1) )+l 
RM 1450 Q=INT(25*RND(1) )+l:VOL 

SsSOUND 1,664,4!F2=INT 

(797*RND(1))+1 
HC 14&0 SOUND 2,F2,4iFOR T=l T 

O QiNEXT T.ZtRETURN 
PF 1470 VOL S:SOUND 2.979,.5iF 

OR Z=l TO 4:FOR F1=10Z 

2 TO STEP-2 4:SOUND 1 

,F1, .5;NEXT Fl 
KG 1480 PDR F1=0 TO 1022 STEP 
[SPACE] 40: SOUND 1,F1,. 

5:NEXT Fl : RETURN 



BEFORE TYPING . . . 

Before typing in programs, please 
refer to "How To Type In 
COMPUTEI's GAZETTE Programs," 
which appears before the Program 
Listings. 



Power BASIC: 

Information Please 

Article on page 101. 

GF 10 PRINT"{CLRH2 DOWN)iWHT) 

READING DATA":CK=0!FORI= 

49152T049423 jREADDsPOKEI 

,D:CK=CK+D:NEXT 
RE 20 IFCK<>30932TUENPRINT"ERR 

OR IN DATA STATEMENTS ": E 

ND 
QP 30 PRINT"(CLR) (2 DOWNJDISK 

(space) OR TAPE (D/T) "; : 

INPUTA? 
RB 40 IFLEFT5(AS,1 ) = ''T"THENDVS 

= "PREPARE TAPE":DV=1:G0T 

O70 
GD 50 IFLEFTS(AS,1)="D"THENDV? 

="IKSERT DISK"iDV=8:GOTO 

70 
XE 60 GOTO30 
ED 70 PRINT" (DOWN) "DV5", THEN 

(space} PRESS (RVS) RETURN 

II 

EG 80 GETA$tIPA5<>aiR5(l3)THEN 

80 
DD 90 PRINT" [down! WRITING FILE 
XP 100 F5="INFO PLEASE ":P0KE2S 

l,PEEK(7l) !POKE252,PEEK 

{72} 
CH 110 AD=PEEK(25U+PEEK(252)* 

2 56:POKE183,PEEK(AD) I PO 

KE187,PEEK(AD+1) 



BR 120 POKE188, PEEK ( AD-)-2 ) t POKE 
1 S4 , DV 1 P0KE186 , DV i POKEl 
85,1 
DJ 130 POKE251,0:POKE252,192iP 
OKE780 , 251 :POKE781 , 16 iP 
OKE782,193iSYS6 5496 
GE 140 PRINT"(CLR}£2 DOWN] INF 
PLEASE FILE CREATED": 
END 
JS 150 DATA 169,181,160,192,32 
,30,171,169,0,133,253,1 
33,254,165,43,133 
BX 160 DATA 251,165,44,133,252 
,160,0,17 7,251,72,200,1 
77,251,240,13,133 
HG 170 DATA 252,104,133,251,23. 
0,253,208,237,230,254,2 
08,233,104,165,254,166 
EH 180 DATA 253,32,160,192,56, 
165,45,229,43,170,16 5,4 
6,229,44,32,160 
DC 190 DATA 192,56,165,47,229, 
45,170,165,46,229,46,32 
,160,192,56,165 
AE 200 DATA 49,229,47,170,165, 
50,229,48,32,160,192,32 
,38,181,56,165 
MX 210 DATA 55,229,51,133,253, 
170,165,56,229,52,133,2 
54,32,160,192,56 
DP 220 DATA 165,55,229,43,170, 
165,56,229,44,32,160,19 
2,56,165,49,229 
PQ 230 DATA 43,170,165,50,229, 
44,168,24,138,101,25 3,1 
70,152,101,254,32 
PD 240 DATA 160,192,56,165,51, 
229,49,170,165,52,229,5 
0,32,160,192,96 
RE 250 DATA 72,138,72,169,9,13 
3,211,32,108,229,104,17 
0,104,32,205,189 
ES 260 DATA 169,13,76,210,255, 
13,13,76,73,78,69,83,46 
,46,46,46 
AB 270 DATA 13,80,82,79,71,82, 
65,77,46,46,13,86,65,82 
,73,65 
EQ 280 DATA 66,76,69,46,13,65, 
82,82,65,69,46,46,46,46 
,13,83 
GM 290 DATA 84,82,73,78,71,46, 
46,46,13,77,69,77,79,62 
,89,46 
AR 300 DATA 46,46,13,85,83,69, 
66,46,46,46,46,46,13,70 
,62,69 
HF 310 DATA 69,46,46,46,46,46, 
13,145,145,145,145,145, 
145,145,145,0 



Icon Changer 
For Gf OS 

Article on page 84. 

GS 10 POKE53281 ,0:POKE532a0,0! 

POKE53269,0!DN5="":IU=0 
ER 20 PRINT " (CLR) [RED) (down) "S 

PC(12)"[ RVS.} ICON CHANGER 

KB 30 PRINT" [ DOWN) |4iEHTER THE 
FILENAME OF THE ICON YO 

U WANT TO CHANGE I DOWN]" 
JB 40 INPUT INS 
EK 50 PRINT" (DOWN) FILENAME SEL 

ECTED IS >(RED)"INS"|4i< 

":PRINT"(D0WN)IS THIS CO 

RRECT"; 
KR 60 INPUT" Y/N";AN5:IF AN$<> 



"Y"THENia 
EQ 70 FORCT=1T016:PD$='PD$+CHRS 
(32) iNEXT:INSaLEFT5(INS+ 
PD$,16) 
ME 80 OPEN15,8,15, "10" 
GP 90 IKPUT»15,ER5,EM5tIFER5<> 
"00"THENPRINTER5+" "+EMS 
;CLOSE15;END 
DS 100 T=ieiS=l 
DX 110 OPEN2,8,2, "#" 
DM 120 PRINT#15, "Ul"!2;0;TfS>F 

C=.0:FP=2!BP=5 
AA 130 PRINT*15, "B-P"f2;0:GET# 

2,NT5,NS5:T=ASC(NT5+CHR 

5(0)); S=ASC ( NS5+CHR5 { ) 

> 
RB 140 PRINTH5, "B-P"j2;FPiGET 

#2,FTS:FT5=FT5+CHRS(0) j 

I FASC ( FTS ) =0THEN 280 
GP 150 PRINT#15, "B-P";2;BP 
MP 160 FORCT=1T016 
XM 170 GET#2,BI5 
AP 180 IFBI$=""THENBI?=CHR?(0) 
MK 190 FI=ASC(BI?) 
RE 200 IFFI>127THENFI=FI-128 
HX 210 IPFI<32THENFI=63 
FX 220 IFFI>96ftNDFI<123THENFI= 

FIAND223 
PQ 230 IFFI=34THENFI"63 
FC 240 DN5-DN?+CHRS{FI) 
BE 250 NEXTCT 
ED 260 IFDN5=IN5THEN310 
AK 270 DN$="" 
KR 280 FC=FC+l!lFFC=8ANDT<>0TH 

EN120 
QE 290 IFFC=8ANDT=0THEN560 
HJ 300 FP=FP+3 2tBP=BP+3'2tG0TOl 

40 
GH 310 GET*2,IT5,IS5 
BG 320 IT=ASC(rT5+CHR5{0)) !lS= 

ASC(IS5+CHR5(0) ) 
FM 330 PRIBT#15, "Ul";2r0;IT;IS 
MG 340 PRINT#15, "B-P"f2;5 
EF 350 FORCT=1T063:GET#2,ID5:I 

D-ASC(ID5+CHRS(0)) sPOKE 

831+CT,IDiNE3CT 

EA 360 POKE53269,l iPOKE2040,13 

JPOKE53287 ,11 iPOKE53248 

,110;POKE53249,147 
GR 370 POKE53249,147 
AR 380 PRINTSPC(15}"(2 DOWN] 

[BLU)<- CURRENT ICON" 
MJ 390 RESTORE :F0RCT=lTO63 
JQ 400 READNI:P0KE89 5+CT,NI 
EE 410 NI5=NIS+CHRS(NI) 
PQ 420 NEXTCT 
FC 430 POKES3269,3iPOKE2041,14 

;POKE53288,ll :POKE53250 

,110!POKE53251,160 
FP 440 PRINTSPC(15)"[3 DOWN 3 

[REDJ<- new ICON" 
BD 450 IFIU=0THENPRINT" 

[2 DOWN) 143 PROCEED WITH 
CHANGE"; 
EM 460 IFIU-0THENINPUT" Y/N";A 

NSiIF ANS<>"Y"THEN GOTO 

550 
XK 470 IFIU=0THENPRINT#15, "B-P 

":2;5 
EH 480 IFIU=0THENPRINT#2,NI$; 
XJ 490 IFIU=0THENPRINT#15,"U2" 

;2;0!lTrIS 
MC 500 IFIU=0THENIU=l! PRINT" 

(11 UP) "iGOTO330 
MH 510 PRINT" (2 DOWN)i43CHANGE 
COMPLETED [13 SPACES)": 

CLOSE2tCLOSE15 
XM 520 PRINT "(down] DO YOU WANT 
TO CHANGE ANOTHER ICON 
T0(3 SPACES }THIS PATTE 

RN"; 
QP 530 INPUT" Y/N"fA5:IFA5="Y" 



1 14 COMPUTErs Gazette January 1987 



THENI0 
DF 540 CLOSE2iCLOSE15iPOKES326 

9,0:END 
AP 550 CLOSE2!CLOSE15:POKE5326 

9,g:PRINT"£CLR}"iPRINTS 

PC( 13) "CHANGE ABORTED": 

END 
SM 560 PRINT" ( DOWN }FILE NOT FO 

UND":CL0SE2 :CL0SE15 (END 
GG 570 REM ** ICON DATA ** 
HC 5B0 REM ** GEOPAINT ICON ** 
JA 590 DATA 255,255,255,146,73 

,1,255,2 55,125,168,0,1, 

248,31,141,168 
XD 600 DATA 32,81,248,64,33,16 

8,64,225,248,131,17,171 

,255,253,248,136 
HX 610 DATA 17,168,112,33,248, 

64,33,169,160,65,250,31 

,129,136,0,1 
XK 620 DATA 255,255,255,136,6, 

12 9,136,4,189,136,4,129 

,255,255,255,227 
CG 630 REM ** GEOWRITE ICON ** 
HC 640 DATA 255,255,255,146,73 

,1,255,255,125,170,170, 

171,255,255,255,128 
MC 650 DATA 0,1,129,94,129,129 

,170,129,128,0,1,133,25 

1,117,128,0 
PP 660 DATA 1,191,215,221,128, 

0,1,190,237,181,128,0,1 

,189,181,253 
MC 670 DATA 128,0,1,187,124,1, 

128,0,1,134,245,189,255 

,255,255,35 
EG 680 REM ** GEOWRITE APPLICA 

TION ICON »i** 
HJ 690 DATA 255,255,255,216,0, 

31,252,0,31,129,188,31, 

129,94,1,129 
BA 700 DATA 235,1,128,0,1,128, 

0,1,128,0,1,255,255,255 

,128,0 
JJ 710 DATA 1,255,255,255,224, 

0,7,159,0,249,128,255,1 

,129,0,129 
KD 720 DATA 134,0,97,136,0,17, 

176,0,13,192,0,3,255,25 

5,255,98 
FM 730 REM •* GEOWRITE APPLICA 

TION ICON »2** 
XK 740 DATA 31,2 5 5,2 48,64,0,2, 

0,15,0,128,127,129,131, 

255,1,143 
GJ 750 DATA 254,1,176,127,65,1 

28,2 54,177,131,184,1,14 

2,16,1,128,12 
DM 760 DATA 1,143,255,241,128, 

0,1,136,146,129,141,170 

,129,138,186,129 
AF 770 DATA 136,170,241,128,0, 

1,15,255,240,64,0,2,31, 

255,248,251 
JM 780 REM ** GEOPAINT APPLICA 

TION ICON ** 
FR 790 DATA 255,255,255,128,0, 

1,145,17,1,185,17,1,190 

,170,253,184 
MM 800 DATA 68,1,144,68,1,144, 

0,1,144,80,1,144,80,1,1 

84,80 
KQ 810 DATA 1,191,223,253,184, 

80,1,144,80,1,144,80,1, 

144,3,255 
HF 820 DATA144,2,1,144,2,245,1 

44,2,189,128,2,1,255,25 

5,255,34 



Keyword 
Construction Set 

Article on page 56. 

HP 10 PRINT" {CLR) (CYN)":POKi:53 
280,6:POKE532O1 ,6:PRINT" 
KEYBOARD CONSTRUCTION SE 
Tg83{2 DOWN)" 
HM 20 N=411 17:M=49221:PRINT"EN 
TER NEW LANGUAGE NAME " : I 
NPUT B? 
JA 30 PRINT" (2 DOWN] PRINTER (Y 

/N)7"; 
ED 40 GETASiIFA$=""THEN4a 
QH 50 IFA5="y"THENGOSUB200 
AX 60 X5="":IFN>=41372THEN90 
XH 70 N=N+1 :X=PEEK(N) :1FX<128T 

HENX5=X$+CHR5(X) :GOTO70 
CQ 80 X5=X5+CHR9(X-128) :LN=LEN 

(X5) :GOSUB210:GOTO60 
RD 90 IFRT>0 THEN PRINT" (DOWN) 
TABLE TOO LONG": FOR 1=1 
{ SPACE )T0 1500 :NEXTt RUN 
DQ 100 CLOSE4:POKEM,0: FORI =491 

52TO492 20:READA!POKE1 ,A 

jF=F+A:NEXT 
RM 110 IFF<>10293THENPRINT"ERR 

OR IN DATA STATEMENTS." 

• STOP 
RE 120 PRINT"(2 DOWN 3 [RVS } iBlT 

[OFF)iCYN)APE/[RVSliBiD 

(OFF) (CYN)ISK7"f 
MD 130 GETA5!lFAS=""ORA5<>"D"A 

NDA5<>"T"THEN130 
RK 140 DV=1-7*(A?="D") :IFDV=BT 

HENBS="0:"+B? 
HS 150 FS=BS:POKE780,LEN{F5) :A 

=PEEK(53)+2S6*PEEK(54}- 

LEN(F5) :POKE7B2,A/256 
GX 160 POKE781,A-256*PEEK(782) 

!SYS65469:POKE780,l!p6K 

E781 , DV 1 POKE782 , PEEK ( 78 

0} 
FK 170 SYS65466iPOKE 251,0:POK 

E252,192 iPOKE7ai,69:POK 

E782,193 tPOKE780,2 51:SY 

S65496 
DD 180 PRINT: PRINT" {down) LOAD" 

CHR5 ( 34 >B?OTRS ( 34 ) " , 8, 1 
-[2 SPACES) NEW 

E2 SPACES) -[2 SPACES J SY 

S49152" 
FC 190 END 
PF 200 P»ltOPEN4,4!PRINT#4,"BA 

SIC{9 SPACES) "BS:PRINT# 

4: RETURN 
EJ 210 N1=N-41117 SPRINT" (CLR) 

ESiTOTAL BYTES="N1" OVE 

R/UNDER (+/-)="RT 
MA 220 A5=X5 t PRINT" (down) i3i"X 

5TAB(10}"|CyN3"! tINPUTA 

S I IFA$=X$THENPRINTAS 
EG 230 LA"LENtA$):D=«LA-LN:RT»R 

T+D 
XD 240 FORI=1TOLA:POKEM,ASC(MI 

D5(A5,I,1}) :M=M+1:NEXT: 

P0KEM-1,PEEK(H-1)+128 
RH 250 IFPTHENPRINTI4,X5r iFORI 

=lT015-LENtX?) iPRINT#4 , 

" "; :NEXT)PRINT#4,A5 
OG 260 RETURN 
FG 270 DATA 169,0,133,251,169, 

160,133,252,160,0 
FK 280 DATA 162,32,177,251,145 

,251,200,208,249,230 
FQ 290 DATA 252,202,208,244,16 

9,69,141,189,165,141 
CX 300 DATA 0,166,141,49,167,1 

41,57,167,169,192 



GF 310 DATA 141,190,165,141,1, 
166,141,50,167,141 

XM 320 DATA 58,167,169,68,141, 
251,165,169,192,141 

AD 330 DATA 252,165,165,1,41,2 
54,133,1,96 



Data-Aid 

See itistructions itt article on page 
92 before typing in. 



C000 


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COMPUTEI's Gazette January 1987 115 



C230:F9 
C238iSA 


C9 
A0 


2D 
00 


F0 
91 


29 

14 


20 
E6 


9E 
14 


B7 
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98 
79 


Mastering 128 


C240:02 
C248jD0 


E6 
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15 
A0 


20 
01 


79 
Bl 


00 
7A 


C9 
C9 


00 
00 


84 
9D 


Sound and Music 


C250:F0 


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20 


73 


00 


20 


73 


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F3 








C258i20 


73 


00 


18 


90 


C5 


A6 


43 


78 






on page 58. 


CZ60JA4 


44 


86 


7A 


84 


7B 


60 


00 


94 


Article 


C26BS8D 


69 


03 


EA 


A2 


19 


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92 


79 








C270!C2 
C27ai06 


20 
8D 


D2 
21 


FF 
D0 


CA 
A9 


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06 


P7 
BD 


A9 
20 


EC 
36 


Program 1: 128 Sound and 


C2e0!D0 


60 


20 


44 


45 


54 


41 


56 


23 


Music— 


-baints 


C298:49 
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41 


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54 


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44 


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00 


4D 






UV3O3QGV104QEQDV3O3QGVZ 


C35a:4B 


68 


C9 


FF 


D0 


03 


4C 


E0 


63 






QB" 


C360!C3 


20 


F3 


t;2 


A8 


A2 


FF 


BE 


DA 


PJ 


120 


GOSUB280 


C368:88 


C3 


A2 


CF 


8E 


89 


C3 


IB 


B0 


HK 


130 


GET X? 


C370JAD 


38 


C3 


69 


09 


90 


03 


EE 


77 


ED 


140 


IF X5="C" THEN GO TO 37 


C378i89 


C3 


8D 


88 


C3 


88 


D0 


EF 


CI 









C380:A2 


09 


A0 


24 


20 


9A 


C3 


BD 


62 


PA 


150 


IF X5="L" THEN LP=ABS(L 


C388i97 


Dl. 


99 


42 


03 


88 


88 


88 


7B 






P-1) :GO TO 120 


C390:CA 


D0 


F4 


20 


A4 


C3 


18 


90 


47 


DC 


160 


IF XS="B" THEN BP=ABS(B 


C398:C0 
C3A0:33 
C3A8 ! A9 
C3n0:BD 
C3B8:8D 


00 
85 
01 
FB 
27 


A9 
01 
8D 
0? 
D0 


00 
60 
0E 
A9 
8D 


90 
A9 
DC 
01 
17 


0E 
37 
60 
8D 
D0 


DC 
85 
A9 
15 
8D 


A9 
01 
0D 
D0 
ID 


BD 
7F 
A0 
Fl 
F7 


All 
PX 


170 
180 


P-1)!G0 TO 120 

IF XS = "K" THEN HP=ABS(ti 

P-1):G0 TO 120 

IF XS="R" THEN GO TO 40 




C3C0:Da 


A9 


B0 


8D 


00 


D0 


8D 


01 


63 






C3C8:Da 


A9 


05 


20 


D2 


FF 


EA 


BD 


BF 


AS 


190 


IF X5="P" THEN GO TO 21 



C3D0!2.1 


D0 


A9 


00 


A0 


45 


99 


39 


D8 






C3D8:03 


88 


D0 


FA 


BD 


IC 


D0 


60 


AC 


JS 


200 


GO TO 130 


C3E0:20 


CF 


FF 


C9 


0D 


D0 


03 


4C 


07 


QJ 


210 


FILTER CF,LP,SP,HP,RES 


C3E8j1C 


C3 


C9 


SF 


D0 


0E 


A9 


00 


B0 


JM 


220 


PLAY"V1T8X0V2T0X0V3T0X0 


C3F0!8D 


15 


D0 


20 


18 


ES 


20 


5E 


97 






H 


C3Fe:C2 


4C 


74 


A4 


18 


90 


El 


07 


6C 


AJ 


230 


PRINT" {2 DOWN}" 


C400:FF 


00 


00 


m 


00 


00 


00 


00 


89 


GB 
AS 


240 
250 


GOSUa 430! PLAY A5 JGOSUB 
450:PLAY B5 :GOSUB 430: 
PLAY C$ 




















GOSUB 450:PLAY D? :GOSUB 


BEFORE TYPING . 












430! PLAY E5:PLAY F?!GO 


B«for« typing in programs, 


please 








SUB 450SPLAY G? 


refer lo 


"How To Type 


In 








MC 
GH 


260 
270 


GO TO 120 
END 


COMPUTE! 


sGAZbl It Programs,' 




BJ 


280 


PRINT"iCLR} (TAB 3 


which appears 


Before the Program 








14 spacesHrvsIc-126 si 


Listings. 


















GH 


290 


D FILTER12 DOWN]" 
PRINT "{2 SPACES ){RVS}CU 




















TOFF I off} (4 SPACES} 
























{RVS3LPfTAB}lOFF} 
























3 SPACES }{ RVS 3 BP{ TAB} 
























0FF3[2 SPACES} {RVS] HP 
























[TAB] {2 LEFT) RESONANCE" 




















0C 


300 


PRINT USING "##t*ti#";C 
F,LP,BP,HP,RES 




















AJ 


310 


PRINT" {DOWN) PRESS tRVS} 
CfOFF} TO CHANGE CUTOFF 
FREQUENCY" 




















SO 


320 


PRINT-{DOWN}PRESS (RVS} 
LioFF} TO SWITCH LOW- PA 
SS FILTER" 




















AS 


330 


print"1down3press (rvs! 



bIoFF} to SWITCH BAND-P 
ASS FILTER" 

BP 340 print"£down}press [KVSJ 

HtOFF} TO SWITCH HIGH-P 

ASS FILTER" 
QA 350 PRINT"(D0WN3PRESS ( RVS 3 

R(0FF] TO CHANGE RESONA 

NCE" 
GH 360 PRINT "{DOWN} PRESS iRVS) 

PJOFF) TO PLAY":RETURN 
BD 370 INPUT" {DOWN 3CUTOFF FREQ 

UENCY {0-2047)" [CF 
BD 380 IF CF<0 OR CF>2047 THEN 

GO TO 370 
DM 390 GO TO 120 
AC 400 INPUT" {DOWN} RESONANCE ( 

0-15) ";RES 
GJ 410 IF RES<0 OR RES>1S THEN 

GO TO 400 
AP 420 GO TO 120 
QF 430 PIAY "V1X0" 
JQ 440 PRINT "{UP 3 {tab} {RVS} 

{7 spaces) {OFF 3 FILTER O 

FF{RVS){7 spaces} {OFF 3" 
: RETURN 
JP 450 PRINT "{UP} [tab) 

{7 SPACES) {rvs} FILTER O 

N{0FF3 (8 SPACES)" 
MP 460 PLAY "VlXl"i RETURN 

Program 2: 128 Sound and 
Music — Joy 

kr 10 rem joy 

rf 20 priht"{clr) (5 down 3 

[6 spaces 3 jesu, joy of m 

an's desiring" 
fb 30 print" {5 down } { 2 tab) 

{3 spaces3by" 
hh 40 print" {5 down) {tab) joha 

nn sebastion bach" 

AR 50 BANK 15 
XM 60 TEMPO 10 

cs 70 VOL e 

PX 80 ENVELOPE 8,3,1,12,6,2,20 


CF 90 FILTER 0,1,0,0,7 

CK 100 PLAY"V1U9T3X0V2T8X0V3T7 
XI" 

XB 110 AS="V301.0GV1IR04IGIAIB 
V2QDV302 .QGV105IDICV204 
IIFQGV302.QEV10SICIEIDV 
204IA" 

SS 120 B5="V204QGV301 .QBV105ID 
IGI#FV204IAQBV3Q2 .QEVIO 
5IGIDO4IBV2IG03QBV3O1 -0 
EV104IGIAIBV2ID" 

RS 130 CS="V204QEV301 .QAV105IC 
IDIEV204IIFQGV301 .QBVIO 
5IDIC041BV21DQEV3O2.QCV 
104IAIB1GV2O3IB" 

HE 140 D?="V204QCV302.QDV104Ii 
FIGIAV2ID03aAV302.Q#FVl 
04IDI#FIAV2IGQ»FV302.QD 
V105IC041BIAV2I#F" 

PH 150 VOL 7: PLAY AS: PLAY B?:? 
LAY C5JPLAY 05 

HR 160 E?="V204Q0V302.QGVlO4IB 
IGIAV2I#FQGV302.QEV1041 
B05IDICV204I*FQBV302 ,0C 
V1O5ICIEIDV204IA" 

SD 170 F?="V204QGV301 .QBV105ID 
IGI#FV204IAQBV302 .QEVIO 
5IG1DO4IBV2IGO3QBV302 -Q 
DV104IGIAIBV2IG" 

MS 160 G5="V2O4QAV302.QCV104IE 
05IDICV2O4I#FQEV302 .Q#C 
V1O4IBIAIGV2IE03QAV3O2 . 
QDV104 IDIGI*FV2IC " 

RE 190 HS="V203QBV301HGVlO4IGI 
B05IDV2O4IGQBV10SIGIDO4 



116 COMPUTEi's Oazette January 1987 







IBV2IDV303IGQDV2QBV104I 


JG 


510 






GIBO5IDV204IGV302ID" 


HH 


520 


ss 


200 


PLAY EfiPLAY F5jPLAY G5 


SK 


530 






sPLAY H? 


FM 


540 


JE 


210 


I5="V3T7X0Ol .QGV2T704 .H 
DV1T7 .HBV303 .Q#F.QEV204 


JF 


550 






,QGV105.QC" 


JR 


560 


SD 


220 


JS="V105 .HDV204 .QAV303 . 


H5 


5 70 






Q#F.QEV204.QG.Q#FV303.Q 


EQ 


580 






DV105.QD" 






JA 


230 


KS="V1 .HCV204 .0GV3O3 .QE 
.Q#FV204.HDV3O3.QGV104. 










Qfl" 


KB 


590 


BM 


240 


L?="V104IAV2Q#FV303QDV1 
Tao4IDIEI#FV2Ta03QAV3T7 
X1QDV1O4IAIGV2IEV302IDQ 










DV204Q#FV1IA04IC04IBV2I 


KF 


600 






GV303ID" 






RP 


250 


VOL lliPLAY 15: PLAY J? t 










PLAY K5:PLAy L? 


RIJ 


610 


JJ 


260 


M$="V301iroV204QtFVlO5IC 
04IA1#FIDI#FIAV2IDV303I 
DQDV2QAV105IC04IBIAV2I* 
FV303ID" 






FD 


270 


NS="V303 .QGV204 .QDVIIBI 
GIAIBV2QGV303 .Q#FV105ID 
1CV204I#FQGV303 -QEVIOSI 
CIEIDV204IA" 


KM 


620 


DS 


280 


OS="V105IDV302 .0BV2O4QG 
V105IGI#FV204IAQGV301.Q 
BV105IGID04IBV2I#FQEV30 
3.QBV104IAIBV2IG" 


QD 


630 


FF 


290 


P?="V2O4QAV303.QCVlO4IE 
O51DICV204IGQ#FV303 -QDV 
104IBIAIGV2IEQCV302 .QDV 
104IDIGI#FV2IC" 


SK 


640 


ED 


300 


PLAY M$:PLAY M5:PLAY 0? 

:PLAY P5 


MG 


650 


KB 


310 


QS = *'V203 .UBV302 .QGV104I 
GIBIAIBV2 .QDV303 .QGViOS 
IDICICV2O4QGV303 .QEV105 
IEIDV2041A" 


GP 


660 


HP 


320 


R5 = B5 


GX 


670 


SR 


330 


S?=C5 






FS 


340 


T5=D$ 






CC 


350 


VOL 7iPLAY Q5iPLAY RSiP 
LAY SSiPLAY T5 


1!X 


680 


KB 


360 


US = E? 






SC 


370 


V5=F5 






HD 


380 


W?=G5 


DQ 


690 


FF 


390 


X? = I? 






DM 


400 


PLAY U5:PLAY V?jPLAY W$ 
:VOL 3: PLAY X? 






PG 


410 


YS=J5 


KQ 


700 


MJ 


420 


Z?=K5 






DG 


430 


AAS="VlO4I#FV2.QAV303QD 
V1T804IDIEI#FV3T7X103QD 
V104IAIGV2T8IEV3O2IDQDV 
204Q#FV1IA04IC04IBV2IGV 


KA 


710 






303ID" 


EF 


7 20 


MG 


440 


AB5=M5 






FJ 


450 


PLAY Y5:PLAY Z$:PLAY AA 
$:PLAY AB? 






XQ 


460 


AC5="V303.QGV2T7O4.HBVl 
IDIGIAIGV303 .QIFVIOSIDI 
C04IGV205 .QCV303 .QEVIOS 
lEID" 


PC 


730 


CM 


470 


AD$="V104IGV205 .HDV302 . 
QBV105IGItFIGV3 03 .QBVIO 
5ID04IBIGV2 .QBV303 .QEVl 
041AIB" 


FK 


740 


PD 


480 


AE5="V104IEV2.IAV303.QC 
V105IDV2O4.SBV1O5ICV2.S 
C04 .QBV1I#FV303 .QDV104I 


AJ 


750 






AIGIDV303 .QDV204 .QAVl IG 


BG 


760 






I#F" 






QS 


490 


AF5="V103IBV204.HGV302. 
QGV104IBIAIBV303. QGVIOS 










IDICICV303 ,QEV2T804QGV1 


PP 


7 70 






OSIEIDV204rA" 






PM 


500 


PLAY AC$:PLAY AD? :PLAY 
£ SPACE ]AE5: PLAY AF? 







AG$>>B$ 
AHS»C$ 
AIS=DS 
AJ5=E$ 

play agsiplay ah? : play 
EspaceJai$iplay AJS 

AKS-F5 
AL5=G5 

AM5="V203QBV301HGV104rG 
IB05IDV2O4IG.QBV1O5IGID 
O4IBV303IGQ#FV2O4QDV104 
IGIB05I#CV204IGV303IE" 
AH5="V3T703 .QDV2T704 .Q# 
FV105ID04IDIEI#FV2.QDV3 
03 .QCV104IAI»GI»GV302 .Q 
BV204,QDVirBIA" 
PLAY AKSjPIAY ALSjPLAY 
[ SPACE ) AM? 1 VOL 1 1 t PLAY 
(SPACE Jan? 

AOS="V104IAV2QEV302.QAV 
1O5IC04IBV2IDQEV1O5ICV3 
03 ,IAV104IAV303 .IGV104I 
EICV303 . I FV204 .QAVl IDV3 
O3.IEV104IE" 
AP? = "V104IFV3 03.QDV2!1BV 
105ID1CIDV3O2.QBV1O4IBV 
2 SR. SCVl 1 1 GV2 . SD03 .QBV3 
.QEV104IEI#FI#G" 
AQS="V104IAV303 .QAV204 . 
QCV1O5IC04IBO5ICV204.QC 
V303.QAV105IEIDIDV204.Q 
AV303,QDV105IFIE" 
AR?="V10SIEV3O3 .QCV204 . 
0AV105 lAI #GIAV205QCV3O3 
.QFV105IEICV204IAQFV303 
.QEV1O4IB05ICV2O4IA" 
PLAY AOS:PLAY APSiPLAY 
f SPACE )AQ?i PLAY ARS 
AS5="V20QAVl05irv3O3.QD 
V105IEIDV2O4I#GQAVlOSIC 
V3O3.Q#DV104IBIAV2I#FO3 
QBV3 .QEV104IEIAI#GV2ID" 
ATS=«"V205 .HCV303 .QAV104 
IA0SICIEIAV3O3 ,QA.QBV20 
S.QDV1T704.QG" 
AU5="V1041GV2O5 .HEV3Q4 . 
QCV1T805ICIDIEV303 .QAVl 
05IGIFIGV2.QEV304.QCV10 
5I$BIA" 

AV?="V10S1AV2HDV303.QFV 
1O6IC05IB06ICV3O3.0DV1O 
5IAV2SR.SEV1IFV2.SF.QDV 
303.0GV1O5IDIEIF" 
PLAY AS$tVOL 15:PLAY AT 
? J PLAY AU5!PLAY AV? 
AW?="V105IEV2 .QCV304 .QC 
V1051GIFIGV2.QCV303 .QEV 
105IEIC041GV2QEV303.QCV 
104rAI5BV2ID" 
AXS="V204QCV303 .QFV104I 
A05ICO4IBV2IE.QFV303.QD 
VI 05 IC04 lAI FIDV2QBV303 . 
QGV104IEIFV205ID" 
AYS="V204QGV303.QCV104I 
EIC I DV2 IG05QCV 1 04 1 EI GI # 
FV2 IAV303 IC02QBV205QDV1 
04IGIBIAV2I#FV3 03ID" 
AZ5="V302 .QGV203 .HBV104 
IBIGIAIBV303 .QGVIOSIDIC 
ICV204.QCV303 . QEVIOS lEI 
D" 

PLAY AW? 1 VOL 13:PLAY AX 
?!PIJiY AY5iVOL llsPLAY 
(SPACE }AZ? 

BA5="VlO5IDV204 .HDV302 . 
QBV105IGI*FIGV302 .QEVIO 
5ID04IBIGV2.QDV303.QEV1 
041AIB" 

BB5="V105ICV204 .QCV302 . 
QAV105IDIEIDV203 .HBV302 
.QBV105ICO4IBIAV3O3 ,QCV 
104IBIG" 



SF 790 BC?="V104I#FV2O3.HAV3.Q 
DV104ID1EI#FIAIGV303IUQ 
DV204Q# FVl I A05 1 C04 1 BV2 1 
GV303ID" 

SQ 790 BD$="V302.QDV204Q#FV105 
IC04LM#FIDItFIAV2IDV30 
3 1 DQDV2QAV105 IC04I BIAV2 
IDV303ID" 

RJ 800 PLAY BA$ i PLAY BB? i PLAY 
{ SPACE )BC?! PLAY BDS 

GK 810 BE? = "V303.QGV2.1iBV104IB 
IGIAIBV303.QtFV105IDICI 
CV204.QCV303.QEV10SrEID 

PI 

SJ 820 BF?="V105IDV204.HDV302. 
OBV105IGIIFIGV302 .QBVIO 
5ID04IBIGV203 .QBV3 .QEVl 
04IAIB" 

QR B30 BG5="V104IEV203.IAV3,QC 
V105IDV203.SBV105ICV204 
. SC03 .QBV303 .QDV104I BIA 
IGIDV203 .QAV3 .QDV104IGI 
#F" 

PG 840 BH$="VlO4IGV2T8O30BV3O2 
.WGVlO4IB05IDV2O4IGqBVl 
0SIGIDO4IBV2IGQDV1IGID0 
5IDV2041G" 

RS 850 PLAY BE?iPLAY BF$iPIAY 
[SPACE J BG?! VOL 7 : PLAY B 
H? 

DG 860 BIS="V204QDV105IFIDO4IB 
IGV302WGV104IB05IDV204I 
GQEV105IEIC04IAV2IC" 

FG 870 BJ5="V203QAV104I#FIA05I 
CIDV302.HGV104IBIGV2IDO 
3QBV104IEIGI8V2IE" 

PB 880 BK?="V2O30EV3O2WGV105IC 
041AI#FV203IAQ#FV104IDI 
IFIA05ICV204Q»FVHBIAV2 
ID" 

FA 890 HL?="V2T7O4.QGV3T7X0.QD 
V1T7O4IBIGIAIBV2.QDV303 
.QGVIOS I Die ICV2O4QGV303 
.0EV1O5IEIDV204IA" 

XK 900 PLAY BI Si PLAY BJ5:PLAY 
[SPACE)BK5:V0L 3SPLAY Q 
L? 

EK 910 BM?=RS 

XP 920 BN5=S9 

GQ 930 BO?=TS 

KS 940 BP5=US 

AA 950 PLAY BM?;PLAY BN? sPLAY 
(SPACE)BO? iPLAY BP? 

HA 960 BQ5=V5 

QC 970 BRS=W5 

KK 980 BS5="V2O3WBV3WDV104WG" 

HA 990 PLAY BQSsPLAY BR? : PLAY 
{SPACE J BS? 

QX 1000 PRINT "(CLR]" 



BEFORE TYPING . . . 

Before typing in programs, please 
refer to "How To Type In 
COMPUTES's GAZETTE Programs," 
which appears before the Program 
Listings. 



COMPUrsrs Gazem January 1987 H7 



BEFORE TYPING . . . 

Before typing in programs, please 
refer to "How To Type In 
COMPUTES's GAZETTE Programs," 
which appears before the Program 
Listings. 



Decipede 



See instructions in article on page 
50 before typing in. 

Program 1: Decipede— Part 1 

KP 10 IP PEEK (49152)= 169 THEN3 


AR 20 IFL-0THENL=liLOAD"DEC ML 

",B,1 
QP 30 PRINT CHRS{8) iGOTOSee 
FP 40 M-3SW-1 tC-l>S-25iP»25 
XD 50 PRINT "(CLRHVEL ] GUNS" fM; 

"(5 SPACES JSCORE "; N; " 

{9 SPACES] Eblk} WWWWWWWW 

WW"; 
HC 60 PRINT" WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW 

WWVfWWWWWWVfWWQQQQQQQQQQ" ^ 
GH 7a PRINT" 139 SPACES ]X": 
GS 80 F0R1-1T021 
PK 90 PRINT "X[ 36 SPACES JX" J 
AP 100 NEXTl" 
AB 110 PORI==1TO150 
KH 120 R=RND(1)*679+1 

cs 130 POKE1144+R, ee 

KG 140 NEXTIjP0KE1984,88iPOKE2 

023,e0:POKEie64,6Z 
AR 150 GOSUB190 
JE 160 SYS 50572iPOKE251,2iliP 

0KE252,7 
GX 170 SYS 49152 
QX 180 GOTO240 
JM 190 SYS 496801 SYS 51432 tPOK 

E49299,2 
MJ 200 POK£52994,CiPOKE52996,S 
MQ 210 POKE 52998, 0:POKE52997, 


DQ 220 POKE52999,0iSS-2iPOKE53 

013,SSiPOKE53015,0iPOKE 

6,0 
QD 230 FORXX-5427 2T05429S1POKE 

XX,0tNEXTiPOKB54296,15i 

RETURN 
XJ 240 REM 
CF 250 IFPEEK( 52998) <10THENH=H 

-1 !IFM=0THENPRINT" (CLrJ 

"iGOTO550 
EM 260 X«PEEK ( 52997 ) tY-PEEK( 52 

998) iSP-PEEK(53015) «SI- 

PEEK( 53002) 
MK 270 N=N+X*25+y*50+SP*200+SI 

*1200 
CK 280 IFN=>I2000*WTHENM-M+liW 

^W+1 
MH 290 PRINT"tHOME)tYEL3"TAB(5 

)tM;TAB(17)iN 
FR 300 PRINT" [UP] [BLKI WWWWWWWW 

WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWQ 

QQQQQQQQO ^ 
FE 310 SYS~50Sn 
XE 320 FOR1=1TOX+Y+13 
SA 330 R-=RHD(1) •679+1 
RQ 340 POKE1144+R,a8 
PQ 350 NEXTI 
CE 360 POKE1110+2,32 
QE 370 Z-RND(l)*3l+l 
AA 380 POKElllB+Z.ee 

lie COMPUTErs Gazette January 1987 



EC 390 IFPEEK{ 52998 )<10THENP-P 

-1 IGOTO490 
DA 400 C-C+liIFC=l5THENC-l 
QD 410 IFC/3<>INT(C/3)THEN4B0 
XP 420 ONC/3GOTO430,440,450,46 

0,470 
KM 430 S=P-3 iP=P-l IGOTO500 
RK 440 S-P-3 tP-P-1 1GOTO500 
KJ 450 S=P-4iP-P-l>GOTO500 
RX 460 S-P-4iP-P-liGOTO500 
BX 470 S-P-4iP-P-l 1GOTOS00 
JA 480 IFC<eTHENS-PiGOTO500 
ME 490 S=P-1 
AD 500 IPS<7THENS"7 
GS 510 IFP«7THENP"13 
CC 520 GOSUB190 
SP 530 SYS 50572iPOKE2Sl,211iP 

OKE252,7tSYS49152 
MF 540 GOTO240 
BA 550 PRINTMCLRJ [15 EaGHT] 

(10 DOWNllREDlGAME OVER 

H 

FP 560 PRINTsPRINTiPRINT" 
!15 RIGHT 1SC0RE";N 

GM 570 FORS31TO4000SNEXT 

CR 580 POKE53280,0iPOKE53281,0 
iPRINT"(CLR] {blu3 
[7 DOWNl"; 

PE 590 PRINT" [4 SPACESJlRVSj 
(2 SPACES li*l (OFF I 
lKVS3£ E*|l0FF] iRVS] 
£ i*ITOFFJ [RVSj£ 1*1 

Toff] {rvsIje g*3ToFFl 

lSPACE)[KVST£ i*l[OFF] 

{RVS3 !2 SPACES J g*i 
[OFF] {RVS}£ |*i(OFP)" 
JQ 600 PRINT" [4 SPACES HRVS) 

(OFF) [RVSJ [OFF] JRVS] 

t OFF j 1 3 SPACES J [ RVS ) 
t OFF j [ 4 SPACES ! [ RVS ) 
10FFH2 SPACES} iRVS} 
(off! [RVS} (OFF) (RVS] 

{0FFj{3 SPACES) (rVS) 
JOPF) [RVS] [OFFJ ■{RVS} 

{OFF}" 
GR 610 PRINT" [4 SPACES) [RVS] 

[OFF] (RVS) (OFF) [RVS) 
(2 SPACES) [off) 
( 2 SPACES ) ( RVS 1 [ OFF ] 
1 4 SPACES) [RVS] [OFF) 
1 2 SPACES j [ RVS ) 
(2 SPACES) i OFF l£ (RVS) 
{2 SPACES HOPP) 
(2 SPACES)(RVS) {OFF) 
{ RVS ) ( OFF ) { RVS ) 
(2 SPACES] [OFF]" 
CF 620 PRINT" [4 SPACES] (RVS) 

[OFF] (RVS) (OFF) (RVS J 

( OFF ] [ 3 SPACES ) ( RVS ] 
tOFF)l4 SPACES) (RVS 3 
(OFF) {2 SPACES H RVS) 
(OFF) (3 SPACES) I RVS 3 
(off) (3 SPACES) (RVS) 
( OFF J { RVS ) (OFF ) { RVS } 

[OFF]" 
ME 630 PR1NT"(4 SPACESKRVS) 
(2 SPACES] (OFP)£ g*3 
[RVS] {OFF)£ g*T{RVS) 
(SPACE) [0FFT£ i*3{HVS] 

{OFF)£ IRVST (OFF) 
(3 SPACES I i*HHVS) 
(OFF)£ lRVS){2 SPACES) 
(OPP)£ g*8(RVS) (OPP3 
£(3 DOWN]" 
SX 640 PRINTIPRI^fTSPC(e)"[RVS) 
PRESS TRIGGER TO BEGIN 
I OFF ) ■ 

MA 650 IFPEEK( 56320 )=111THENRU 

N 40 
EX. 660 GOTO650 



Program 2: Decipede 



C000:A9 

C008:A9 

C010!A9 

0018:00 

C020 

C028 

C030 

C038 

C040 

C048 

C050 

C058 

C060 

0068 

C070 

C078 

0080 

0088 

C090 

0098 

C0A0 

00 A8 

O0B0 

00 B6 
0000 

cac8 

C0D0 
C0D8 
O0E0 
C0E8 
C0F0 
C0Fa 
0100 
C10B 
0110 
C118 
0120 
C128 
C130 
C138 
C140 
C148 
C1S0 

cisa 

0160 
C16B 
0170 
0178 
0180 

ciea 

0190 
CI 98 
C1A0 
ClAB 
01 B0 
CIBB 

01 CM 
0108 
C1D0 
C1D8 
O1E0 

cisa 

C1F0 

CI Fa 

0200 

c20e 

0210 
C21B 
C220 
0228 
C230 
0238 
0240 
C248 
C250 
0258 
0260 
0268 
C270 
C278 
C2B0 
C288 
C290 



:00 
It03 
):0e 
1 1 20 

:A9 
iiD0 

:F0 
It 02 

:03 
liA0 

:O0 
li8E 
I [00 
1 1 06 

!C6 
liC9 
Ii29 

!73 

!A5 
tt9C 
ItCF 

t!00 

1:09 
iiD4 
1:00 
liGF 

:00 
1:00 

:A0 
It 18 
Ii02 
li4C 
liFD 
ItFE 
1 1 00 
It00 
!:13 
1 1 90 
liOF 
1.91 

:D0 
ltC9 

iice 

liC9 
liCB 
1:09 
IiC7 
ItlA 
liOF 
1 1 41 
It 60 
1:08 

:8E 
Ie8E 
ltC0 
ItCl 
1 1 06 
1«5F 
1:45 
1 100 
1:01 
lt4F 
ltA2 
ItSE 
ItSE 
1 1 00 
ItCl 
liA3 
li4A 
liA2 
liA2 
1:60 
I t0F 
!iD0 
ltA0 

:B0 
IlB0 
l:B0 

):ac 



58 
85 



50 85 02 
46 85 FD 
00 8D 14 
OF A9 CI 
A9 41 91 
OF 85 90 
CF 8D 11 
10 C9 EA 

51 91 02 
02 E6 03 
21 C9 58 
69 27 85 
4C B9 C0 
00 AS 90 
84 90 20 
13 CF 4C 
00 A0 00 

02 AB 02 

03 Bl 02 
D0 0E 
02 90 

C0 20 68 

90 D0 03 

20 E6 C0 

4C 0E C4 

00 A9 80 

BD 13 D4 

A9 ai 8D 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

06 03 60 

00 00 00 

00 Bl FD 

A5 FD 69 

E6 FE A2 

54 CI A0 

E6 FD A6 

60 00 00 

00 00 00 

A0 00 Bl 

la AS FD 

02 E6 FE 

4C IB CI 

FD C6 FD 

02 C6 FE 
2A D0 05 
C9 5A D0 

03 D0 05 
C9 02 D0 
5E D0 05 
09 56 D0 
06 09 42 
as 90 EA 
D0 06 A0 

30 D0 

8E 41 

90 00 A2 

44 CI 8E 

A2 B0 BE 

8E 5D 00 

BE 11 CI 

00 SE i^ 

01 8E A0 
01 8E SA 
CF 60 00 
AC 01 OF 
18 8E 08 

56 00 as 

0B CI BE 
8E 9F C0 
8E 48 01 

00 A2 E6 

01 8E 5F 
29 8E 45 
27 BE 00 
00 00 00 
CF 8C 10 
03 4C El 

00 A2 00 

01 88 4A 
01 CA 4A 
03 EE 0D 
00 OF AC 



C9 
01 



A9 04 
A9 04 
CF A9 
8D 09 
FB A9 
8D 01 
CF 8D 
EA EA 
E6 02 
Bl 02 
D0 0E 
02 90 
20 68 
D0 03 
E6 C0 
0E C4 
A9 51 
E0 FF 
C9 20 
18 A5 

02 E6 
CI EA 
4C 9C 
A2 82 
00 00 
BD 12 
A9 02 
12 D4 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
09 51 
27 85 

39 8E 
00 A9 
FD D0 
00 00 
00 00 
FD 09 
69 29 
A2 00 
A0 00 
A6 FD 
60 00 
85 90 

03 4C 
A0 29 
03 4C 
85 90 
05 85 
D0 09 

40 33 
00 BO 
50 A2 
CI BE 
E9 BE 
59 00 
0F CI 
BE A3 
8E 4A 
C0 A2 
C0 A2 
00 A2 
00 09 
00 01 
CI BE 
90 C0 
44 01 
A2 90 
BE 5D 
8E 11 

00 BE 

01 8E 
CI 8E 
8D 0E 
CF AO 

02 AD 
BE 0D 
B0 01 
B0 01 
OF BE 
07 CF 



Part 2 




85 


03 


A6 


as 


FE 


E7 


01 


80 


3E 


OF 


A0 


AF 


00 


BD 


61 


CF 


8D 


37 


0A 


CF 


05 


A0 


00 


F9 


A6 


02 


CB 


09 


20 


09 


18 


A5 


E5 


02 


E6 


AF 


CI 


EA 


CA 


40 


56 


3A 


A2 


3E 


06 


00 


00 


48 


91 


02 


00 


D0 


02 


8D 


F0 


21 


5E 


02 


69 


D4 


03 


4C 


5F 


A0 


00 


99 


C0 


84 


51 


BE 


13 


08 


00 


00 


4B 


D4 


A9 


6F 


8D 


0F 


69 


60 


00 


DO 


60 


08 


43 


00 


00 


52 


00 


00 


BA 


00 


00 


7A 


P0 


13 


72 


FD 


90 


33 


08 


OF 


30 


20 


91 


91 


02 


E6 


A4 


00 


00 


43 


00 


00 


B3 


51 


F0 


A9 


65 


FD 


E0 


BE 


08 


9a 


A9 


20 


06 


E0 


FF 


OB 


00 


00 


98 


40 


47 


44 


CB 


C6 


06 


40 


El 


30 


El 


08 


FD 


40 


0B 


35 


90 


40 


06 


8C 


07 


03 


C5 


C9 


34 


00 


CF 


CD 


38 


SB 


77 


56 


00 


40 


0B 


01 


56 


BE 


9F 


50 


8E 


48 


41 


C0 


A2 


BF 


01 


BE 


59 


27 


BE 


ES 


29 


BE 


D4 


01 


BE 


SB 


3E 


D0 


7A 


D0 


48 


71 


41 


01 


CB 


A2 


69 


12 


8E 


59 


70 


BE 


0F 


35 


00 


6E 


59 


01 


BE 


4D 


AS 


00 


6F 


A0 


C0 


D9 


5A 


00 


41 


CF 


BE 


E0 


00 


OF 


F4 


00 


DO 


68 


CF 


4A 


2D 


CB 


4A 


Bl 


E8 


4A 


42 


0B 


CF 


74 


C0 


01 


IE 



C296iD0 
C2MjD0 
C2AB : F0 
C2B0ID0 
C2B8:F0 
C2C0:C3 
C2Cat00 
C2D0I0C 
C2D8t20 
C2E0JC3 
C2B8IEA 
CZF0:4C 
C2F8I02 
C300tSA 
C308iAD 
C310ICF 
C3iai00 
€320100 
C328iC0 
C330I20 
C338i85 
C340SB1 
C348iD0 
C350J04 
C358tA9 
C360E00 
0368160 
C370 1A5 
C378 I E6 
C380IF0 
C38a!C3 
C390)CP 
C398:00 
C3A0I20 
C3A8jFF 
C3B0:DJL 
C3B8tD0 
C3C0I03 
C3C8iEA 
C3D0:00 
C3D8t00 
C3E0:E6 
C3E8JE6 
C3F0:20 
C3Fe:A3 
C400;C3 
C408 t 91 
C410IC9 
C418106 
C420:C4 
€428:31 
C430:03 
€438: D0 
C440:E0 
€448 :A0 
C450J4C 
C458s6C 
C460:CF 
€460 :CF 
C470!AE 
C478jC9 
€460 :A2 
€498 :C6 
C490!€4 
€498 iA4 
C4A0J8E 
€4A8:CF 
C4B0t02 
€4B8!CF 
€4C0:00 
C4C8!F€ 
€4D0:A9 
C4D8 ! 1 
€4E0!A5 
C4 E8 1 €6 
C4F0!Dfl 
C4 F8 1 03 
C500:4C 
C50ai7A 
€510 iC7 
C518iA0 
C520:A9 
C5 23i91 
C530!00 
C538i28 



0B 20 DP 

13 4C El 

0B 20 €3 

03 4C El 
15 E0 01 
4C €7 C2 
CF D0 03 
CF F0 0D 
61 C3 4C 
AD 03 CF 
€9 IE 10 
08 €3 €9 
8D 03 CF 

10 05 A9 
0E CF AE 
4C 31 EA 
00 00 00 
00 00 00 

04 D0 01 
91 FB 38 
FB B0 02 
FB €9 20 
03 4C 6F 
6C 00 CF 
41 91 FB 
AC 00 CF 
A0 00 A9 
FB 69 28 
FC A0 00 
0C C9 59 
BC 00 CF 
A9 41 91 
00 00 00 
91 FB C6 
D0 03 C6 
FB C9 20 
03 4C E0 
4C E0 €3 
A9 41 91 
00 00 00 
00 A0 00 
FB A4 FB 
FC EA A0 
F0 13 C9 
C3 C9 3C 
8C 00 CF 
FB 60 00 

08 90 03 
CF C9 0A 
AC 00 CF 
8D 14 03 
59 60 AC 

03 4C 48 
00 D0 FB 
00 Bl 02 
26 €4 AE 
13 CF AD 
F0 06 EE 
8€ 16 CF 

11 CF M 
29 D0 15 
07 86 A4 
A2 29 8E 
A2 FS 86 
A2 29 8E 
95 C6 20 
20 lA C6 
D0 06 20 
20 00 C8 
00 00 A5 
85 05 A9 

09 80 05 
D4 A9 81 

04 E9 28 

05 A0 00 

03 4C 33 
4€ SF €5 
76 C7 C9 
€5 €9 S6 
C9 2A D0 
28 Bl 04 
20 91 04 

04 A0 01 
00 00 EA 

B] 04 eg 



C4 AC 

€2 AC 
C4 AC 
€2 AE 
D0 06 
20 9D 
4C El 
C0 01 
El C2 
D0 22 
06 EE 
3C 10 
4C 09 

03 8D 
0F CP 
00 00 
00 00 
00 AC 
60 A0 
A5 FB 
C6 FC 
F0 BF 
C3 C9 
60 EE 
60 00 
€0 01 
20 91 
85 FB 
Bl FB 
D0 03 
60 EA 
FB 60 
00 A0 
FB A4 
FC EA 
F0 13 
C3 C9 
8C 00 
FB 60 
00 00 
A9 20 
C0 00 
00 Bl 
SB D0 
m 03 
60 Eh 
00 00 
4C 26 
90 03 
D0 0D 
A9 EA 

04 CF 
C4 A2 
88 4C 
€9 41 
03 CF 

15 CF 

16 €F 
E0 01 
34 AD 
A2 IF 
A2 27 
95 C6 
A3 A2 
3F C6 
00 C6 
6C 13 
BE C6 
6C 13 
FB 85 
90 8D 
D4 A9 
8D 04 
8S 04 
Bl 04 
C5 C9 
C9 5E 
57 D0 
D0 03 
03 4€ 
€9 42 
A0 00 
eC 07 
20 Ee 
42 D0 



BS 
F7 



00 CF P3 
0D CF AD 
00 CF 52 
0B CF BD 
20 DA El 
C3 AC 0C 
C2 AC A8 
D0 06 F0 
20 25 83 
AS A2 0E 
03 CF DC 
08 A9 8F 
C3 €9 14 
03 CF 18 
AC 10 EF 
00 00 67 
00 00 9F 
00 CF 2A 
00 A9 6A 
E9 28 48 
A0 00 23 
C9 58 SA 
42 F0 34 
00 CF 88 
00 00 F9 
D0 01 BC 
FB 18 3A 

90 02 
C9 20 
4C 33 A0 
CE 00 5E 
00 00 0D 
00 A9 4C 
FB €0 B3 
A0 00 06 
C9 58 0B 
3E D0 9 3 
CF 60 99 
00 00 D2 
00 00 59 

91 FB 61 
D0 03 D9 
FB C9 13 
03 4C IC 
4C A3 0F 
A9 41 CE 
AS FE AF 
C4 AD F4 
4C 26 CI 
78 A9 99 
8D 15 89 
C0 00 09 
FF CA 74 
36 C4 BA 
D0 03 70 
D0 03 09 
CD 16 4B 
6€ 13 99 
D0 3F AB 
3F €6 3A 
86 A3 DE 
8E 3F 46 
4C A3 30 
06 86 E6 



AC 

Ba 



A2 27 
6C 13 
CF E0 02 
6C 13 2P 
CF 00 0E 
04 A5 48 
04 D4 84 
AA 8D A3 
D4 38 C3 
B0 02 9D 
€9 51 AD 
58 D0 37 
D0 03 CB 

03 4C 35 
4C 76 82 
A0 C8 97 
D0 04 71 
A9 42 9S 
CF 60 22 
C0 A0 29 

04 A9 68 



C540120 

€548 t AD 

C5S0J00 

C5S8:00 

C560:28 

€568:20 

C570!04 

C57BtCA 

C5B0ID0 

0588 1 8C 

€5 90 iA9 

€598:00 

C5A0I00 

C5A8tE0 

C5B0:D0 

C5B3i85 

C5€0:B1 

C5Ca!F0 

C5D0IF0 

C5D8iF0 

C5E0ID0 

€5E8iD7 

C5F0JA9 

C5F8:05 

€600 iA2 

€608(11 

C610IEA 

C618i3B 

C620.D0 

C628JCP 

C6301CF 

€638 i4C 

C640te5 

€648 iCF 

C6S0:0A 

€658 (4C 

C660t76 

€668 i€F 

C670I7D 

€678 I CF 

€680 tA3 

0688105 

G690:C6 

€698 I B0 

C6A0t00 

C6AB 1 91 

C6B0I00 

0688:00 

0600 :CF 

€6C8t8E 

O6D0:FC 

€6D9iCF 

C6E0I95 

C6E8iF2 

C6P0111 

C6F8iE9 

C700IE8 

0708 140 

C710I5E 

€718 iC7 

C7 20IE0 

€7 28 :4C 

C7 30101 

C738iOF 

C740:A3 

€748iA0 

C7S0:4C 

0758:00 

C760 14C 

€768:76 

€770:07 

C778:B1 

€780:91 

C7 88 ! AE 

C790117 

€7 98iEE 

C7A0:€F 

€7AB:00 

C7B0:8D 

C7B8iA9 

€7€0:8E 

0708: E8 

C7D0:18 

C7Da:8D 

C7E0 :A9 



91 04 A0 

06 CF 09 
CF 8C 07 
00 00 00 
Bl 04 09 
91 04 A0 
EE 05 CF 
€0 A0 28 
04 A9 20 

07 CF 60 
D8 85 05 
91 04 E6 
D0 03 E6 
DB D0 ED 
E7 60 E6 
04 A9 04 
04 C9 51 
26 C9 41 
IE C9 5E 

16 E6 04 

03 E6 05 
A6 05 £0 
20 91 04 
60 00 00 
00 8E 12 
OP A2 lA 
EA EA EA 
€6 A0 00 

04 A9 20 
F0 03 4C 
E0 01 D0 
91 €6 18 
A3 90 02 
A0 00 Bl 
E0 02 F0 
35 C6 C9 

07 C9 41 
8C 11 CF 
€6 C9 58 
BC 11 OF 
4C AE €7 
D0 06 CE 
38 AS A3 

02 06 A4 
Bl A3 C9 
06 4C 5B 
00 00 00 
00 00 00 
F0 03 4C 
18 CF AS 
85 A4 AD 
A2 03 38 
A3 B0 02 
18 AD 11 
CP AE 11 
29 85 A3 
E0 18 D0 
3A 07 A0 
F0 06 AE 
AE 11 CF 
06 10 07 
2P 07 A9 
D0 07 80 
60 18 AS 
90 02 E6 
00 Bl A3 
3A C7 €9 
OF 80 11 
6A C7 €9 
C7 A9 5E 
00 00 00 
04 €9 42 
04 A0 00 

03 CF E0 
CF 40 9B 

17 CF 8€ 
9€ 07 CF 
00 00 00 
0B D4 A9 
0F 9D 0D 

08 D4 A9 
E0 IF D0 
CF EE 18 
0B D4 A9 
0F BD 0D 



00 EE 06 
0A 30 03 
CF 4C €A 
00 00 00 
42 D0 04 
00 A9 20 
ac 07 CF 
Bl 04 €9 
91 04 A0 
A9 50 85 
AD 02 CF 

04 Ae 04 

05 EA A6 
A6 04 E0 

05 60 A9 
85 05 A0 
F0 2A €9 
F0 22 C9 
F0 lA €9 
A6 04 E0 
EA E0 E7 
07 D0 Dl 

40 DA €5 
00 77 00 
CF A2 06 
BE 18 CF 
EA EA EA 
Bl A3 09 
91 A3 AE 
84 C6 AE 

06 EE 12 
AS A3 69 
E6 A4 CE 
A3 09 51 
03 4€ 3B 
42 D0 03 
D0 0€ 8C 
8C 03 CF 
D0 07 80 
60 A9 56 
AE 11 CP 
12 CF 4C 
E9 27 as 
EE 11 CF 
51 D0 03 
€6 00 00 
00 00 00 
00 00 AE 
0B C7 A2 
FB 85 A3 
00 OP 80 
A5 A3 E9 
€6 A4 CA 
CF 69 12 
OF 38 A5 

B0 02 ce 

F0 8E 11 

00 Bl A3 

11 OF 40 

E0 17 F0 

A9 20 91 

56 91 A3 

03 CF 80 
A3 69 26 
A4 CE 11 
C9 51 D0 

41 D0 0C 
CF 8C 03 

42 DB 03 
91 A3 40 
00 00 A0 

00 04 A9 
A9 20 91 

01 D0 06 
C7 EE 17 
11 €F 8C 
40 CA €0 
00 00 A9 
0C 90 0€ 

04 AE 18 
11 8D 0B 

05 A2 19 
CF 60 A9 
0€ 6D 00 
D4 AE 18 



CF 62 
80 66 
C0 07 
A0 84 
A9 90 
91 6B 
4€ C3 
42 A3 
00 8A 

04 B9 
A0 OD 
E0 IB 

05 55 
EB 84 
50 66 
00 FE 
42 7A 
S6 90 
2A 29 
00 B6 
00 3E 
60 38 
E6 00 
FF FC 
SE 75 
EA 67 
4C FE 
56 0P 
12 08 
11 AC 
CF EA 
29 62 
11 24 
D0 B8 
C6 F0 
4€ 76 
00 38 
40 7C 

03 EB 
91 18 
E0 7P 
3B 1£ 
A3 19 
A0 IE 
4€ CB 
00 26 
00 3E 
11 B4 
32 86 
AS DA 
11 19 
F0 5B 
00 7F 
BD 92 
A3 30 
A4 30 
CF FF 
€9 27 
2F 46 

04 9P 
A3 A8 

E0 eE 

11 9F 
65 BD 
CF €6 

03 D0 
BC 10 
CF 05 
40 ED 
D6 CA 
28 40 
20 49 

04 E2 
EE 7E 
CF DA 

03 0€ 
00 28 
10 9B 

04 82 
€F €4 
D4 78 
8E 69 
10 23 
D4 AA 
CF EC 



€7 E8 I BE 
C7F0ICE 
O7Fa:00 
€900 :AE 
C808:A9 
Cai0:A3 
CaiBill 
C8201A3 
0828 iA3 
€830109 
0638:40 
Ce40 sAE 
0648:11 
C850:EE 
C85e:51 
C860:D0 
C868SA3 
0870:80 
€878 tAE 
C8B0:aC 
€888 :0A 
O890:€F 
€898 ;FF 
C8A0:A0 
€8A8:A9 
C8B0:91 
€988:60 
0800 :€0 
CBca:A2 
C8D0 14C 
€808:68 
C8E0:60 
C6E8:A2 
€8F0:A2 
C8F8 : CE 
€900:00 
€908:88 
€910:78 
€918:8D 



08 04 A0 
18 €F 60 
00 00 00 
11 €F F0 
23 8D IB 
A9 05 85 
CF 40 4E 
C9 2A D0 
€9 SB F0 
A0 00 A9 
ca A0 00 
11 CF E0 
CF 80 03 
11 CF A0 
00 03 4C 

03 4€ A0 
A9 10 8D 
00 D4 A9 
IB CF 6E 
0B 04 E0 
40 BE C8 
60 FF FF 
FF FF FF 
28 Bl 04 
20 91 04 

04 EE 0A 
11 CF BC 

00 00 00 

01 6E 19 
00 BE 92 
€0 6E Bl 
AE 19 CF 
Bl BE 4€ 
9C 6E 6B 
93 00 60 
00 02 A0 
CI FF FF 
A9 5C 8D 
15 03 58 



11 8C 0B 
00 00 00 
00 00 00 
03 4C ID 
CF A9 90 
A4 A9 01 
ca A0 00 
IB A0 01 
0D 09 5A 
20 91 A3 
A9 5A 91 
27 D0 07 
CF 60 E6 
00 Bl A3 
47 C8 €9 
ca A9 2A 
0B 04 A9 
0F 6D 0D 

08 04 A0 
23 00 05 
A2 23 BE 
FF FF FF 
FF FF FF 

09 42 00 
A0 00 A9 
CF 8€ 03 
07 CF 4C 
00 00 00 
CF A2 A9 
€0 A2 06 
C0 EE 93 
E0 00 30 
C0 6E 92 
C0 BE BL 
EE 19 CF 
27 Bl 02 
FF FF FF 
14 03 A9 
60 00 00 



04 0C 
00 ED 
32 BA 
ca 82 
85 36 
80 32 
Bl 0F 
Bl 57 
F0 4D 
40 E3 
A3 AD 
6C 8C 
A3 99 
€9 79 
42 IF 
91 81 
0C IC 
04 9E 
11 30 
A2 €C 
18 67 
FF 22 
FF 2A 
04 FP 
20 02 
CF 11 
CA 72 
00 B2 
8E 3A 
BE DE 
00 £6 
14 lA 
C0 F4 
C0 E7 
C0 31 
4€ 62 
FF 50 
02 71 
00 A0 



All programs 

listed in 

this magazine 

are available 

on the 

GAZETTE Disk. 

See elsewhere 

in this issue 

for details. 



COMPUT£rs Qeame January 1967 119 



COMPUTER CENTERS OFAMERrCA'S 




O NEW YEAR BLOWOUT SALE! 



WY HOO-01 

■ 256K RAM SID. EXPANCWBLE TO 
640K ■ ONE 360K HALF-HEIGHT DtSK 
DRIVE ■ 9.54 MHZ. 8088-1 PROCESSOf? 
WITH SOCKET PROVIDED FOR 9,S4 
MHZ B0B7-I ■ 4.77 MH2 COMPATIBILITY 
MODE ■ MS DOS 3 1 WITH GW E«IC 



CCA GOES 
CLONE CRAZYI 




keW- 



WY 1400-02 

DUAL DISKETTE DRIVE. SAME AS WY 1400-01, WITH 
ADDIT.'ON OF A SECOND HALF-HEIGHT, 360K DRIVE, 
64 OK RAM ON MAIN PROCESSOR BOARD. 



'999' 



NEVtf! 



WYSE 

I I I I 



\X/Y 1400-20 

WITH ONE ?OMB HARD DRIVE. SAME AS Wf 1400-02 WITH 

ADDIIION OF A HALF-HEIGHT 20MB HARD DISK DRIVE. 



1399 



99 



^E commodore 
1571 DISC DRIVE 



^239^^229 



95 




ft commodore 

64C INCLUDES 
• GEOS/SOFTWARE 

M69« 



FREE IN BOX / 




J 



INTERFACES 

PPI '34" 

XETECJR "39" 

XETECSR 'S9« 

M-W. 350 I OK BUFFER 69" 



MAGNAVOX 




V^MEAS 
COMMODORE 

1807 



8505 

■ RGB TIL RGB ANALOG, COMPOSITE 
INPUTS 

■ 390 DOTS RESOtUTION |RGB| 
HORIZON W. 

■ 240 LINES RESOLUTION (VERTICAL) 

■ 40 X 25 CHARAQER FIELD, 
1000 CHARACTERS TOTAL 




6562 

■ RGB TJL RGB ANALOG. COMPOSITE 
INPUTS 

a 640 DOTS RESOLUTION (RGBl 
HORIZON lAL 

■ 240 LINES RESOLUTION [VERTICAL) 

■ 80 ;< 25 CHARAOER FIELD, 2000 
ChWRAOER TOTAL 



JL 



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f 




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PERSOfSJAL COMf 

$2499 


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5 



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Filar 128 

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NL-IO 

• D.'JAFr 120 CPS • NLQ 30 CPS • SK SUFFER ■ 

DOT MAIRIX • PLUG -IN JNIERFACE CARTRIDGES 

■ S1ANCW?D FRICTION TRACTOR FEED 

•FULL GRAPHICS 

:249^ 729" 
NX-10 

- DRAFT 120 CPS ■ NLO 30 CPS - SK BUFFER 

• DOT MATRIX • EASif FRONT PANEL OPERATION 

. FRICTION AWD TRACTOR FEED ' PARALLEL 
INTERFACE ■ FULL GRAPHICS 

^24^^ M89" 

SB-IO 

• 24 P(N • [X3T MATRIX ■ DRAFT QUALITY 144 CPS 

- LETTER OLLALITY 54 CPS • FRICTION AND 
TIWCTOR FEED ■ PARALLEL INTERFACE • 

PROPORTJOMAL CHARACTER SET 

LV-T2I0 

• 120CPS • DOT MATRIX • FRICTION AND TRACTOR 
FEED • NEAR LE HER QLIALI TY • FULL GRAPHICS 

IBM COMPATIBLE ^69"*' 
WHILE SUPPLY /----.^ *149" 



$2995 

for the Commodore 128 



FOR ORDERS ONLY 

IN ISI.V. STATE 

CALL TOLL FREE 

1-800-221-2760 

OUT OF STATE CALL 

1-800-631-1003 

FOR ALL OTHER INFO 

516-349-1020 




SP-IOOO 

• Built-in Commodore interf^e 

► 2- Year Warranty 

' Near Letter Quality Mode 

:js^ '154" 

SEIKOSHA 

LIMirED TIME OIVLV 
SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY PRICE 



GEOS 



TM. 



GRAPHIC ENVIRONMENT 
OPERATING SYSTEM 

• 5 DIFFERENT FONTS • DESK 

TOP • GEO PAINT • GEO WRITE • 

DESK ACCESSORIES 

,t=>ji FONT -PACK 
^ DESK - PACK 

FOR THE COMMODORE 64 

.CALL FOR PRICE, 



^r commodore 

64£ PACKAGE 

INJaUDB: 
•Commcxtoce 64 Computer 
•Commodore 1541 Disc Drive 
• A Color MonitOf with Cables 

CAU. FOR PRICE 




CQKIPUTER 

CENTERS OF AMERICA 
81 TERMINAL DRIVE 
PLAINVIEW, NY 1 1803 



Chech. Money OnW. MC or VISA KCCpttd- No 
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itUpptng find rurxlling InfcxTrutlon \ NYS mkVnti 
KM appilcabie h*h tai / Prk« and Jvjilstjillty are 
vJbiea to change wllfiout notke ; All facicny hesh 
merchandlie wtlh irwnuf.xiuref'i warranty. Ov-aler} 
We<come. CaJI for r«enl pcke retJucttoni and r*w 
rc<»te Inf onnjljon- Plui ^tifjftt^ *xl handtlng- rUc 
retumi wtthoui frium authodiatlon mwriber- 

•IN CON!JM£NIA[ LftA OfJiy Af-O nXf, FPO [XT»A 



YOUR COMMODORE 
CONNECTIOr^^ 



AMIGA SYSTEM PACKAGE 

Includes: AMIGA 1000 CPU, 512K, Mouse, Amiga ENTIRE 

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Kaleidoscope, and Voice Synthesis Library. $11 QQOO 



COMMODORE 128 SYSTEM 

INCLUDES: CB128 Computer, CB1571 
Disk Drive, Magnavox 515 
RGB/Composite Monitor, $759®® 



COMMODORE 
System Package 

INCLUDES: CB64 Computer, 

CB1541 Disk Drive, Taxan 220 
Color IVIonitor 




ENTIRE 

SYSTEM 

$47900 



DRIVES 

CBM1541C., S19900 

C8M1541 SiaS" 

C8M1571 5249'«' 

MSD-1 S259M 

MSD-2 S4690'' 

INDUS-GT (64/128).. ..Megoo 



MODEMS 

Anchor Volksmodem...,*59»'' 

Anchor Omega 80 siagoo 

Anchor 6480 (64/128) 

300/1200 Baud S11900 

CBM 1660 (C-64) *59" 

CBM 1670(C-128) SISSO" 



MONITORS 

RGB/COLOR 

Taxan 220 composite*179'><' 

Magtiavox 515 S289'"' 

Amiga 1080 Hi-Res...s26900 
(\^agriavox Monochrome ^7990 

Teknika MJ-22 S279<«> 

Commodore 1802 M99o= 



PRINTERS 

EPSON Homewfiter lO.sggw" 
OKIDATA Okimate 20*119«' 

OKIDATA 182 »219<« 

STAR SL10C *199« 

TOSHIBA 321 »479>» 



DISKETTES 

MAXELL SS/DD 5'/4(10) (Il" 

NASHUA SS/DD 5Vv!(10) '9«» 

Sony SS/SD 5V4(10) »9" 

Sony DS/DD 3V2(10) 29" 

GENERIC DS/DD w/Flip'n File 
10 Disk Holder »11" 



ACCESSORIES 

CompuGuard Surge and Spike Protector 81409 

Curtis SP2 Surge and Spike Protector S39*» 

Curtis Safety Strip with 6 Outlets »19"* 

Curtis Universal Printer Stand «14»» 

Computer Specialties Power Plus. •54" 

Amaray Disk Tubs aVs or 5Va" «9»* 

CB128 Universal Monitor Cable *16»» 



INTERFACES 

Orange Micro Grappler *g9»» 
PPI Printer lnterface,,..*34»» 

Xelec 8K «69" 

Micro Rao MJ350 *44" 



SOFTWARE 

ATAHISOFT/Commodore 

Cenllpede '4" 

□onkey Kong ^A" 

BRODERBUND 

The Prim Shop 'aS" 

Graphics Library 1,2.3 ea,..»17" 

Bark Street Wfiler »34»* 

Gfaptites Comparion 124" 

Music Shop »29" 

COMMODORE 

Jano-integralod (12B) »39»" 

Geos tor 64. 64C. 128 »49" 

Assembler 64 '9" 

Piiol 64 .S9» 

Screen Editor <9*» 

Pet Emulator '9" 

Super Expander ROM 'B** 

DATA SOFT 

Genesrs 'S** 

Dallas Quest »5" 



FOR 64/128 

HES 

Benji Space Rescue '3" 

HES Games/Olympics sa" 

Professional Software 

Fleel Systems fl C128/6^. .»49" 

Fleel Systems III 0126 •59"" 

Trivia Fever 'IS" 



PFS 



File.. 



.'32»» 



SPRINQBOARO 

The News Room 132" 

Clip Arts ..•19« 

Clip Arts II »27" 

SUBLOGIC 

Flighl Simulator II »37" 

Jet Simulator C64 •37" 

SPINNAKER 

Rhymes & Riddles *9" 

All Cocor Caves '7" 

Bubble Burst .*9»" 

Trains '9" 



SOFTWARE FOR AMIGA 



ACTIVISION 

Borrowurt Time S32»s 

h.icker S32" 

Mind Sh.ldow S32" 

AEGIS DEViLOPMENT 
^r^n^fl^■'.,^ CALL 

BATTERIES INCLUDED 

kJlur Pmlfolio Syilf^m •ISO" 

COMMODORE 

TORtcr-lIt w/GFOphic CriilL '59" 

Musiciati >70" 

TLC Logo 179" 

Amiga Pascal '79" 

Lattice "C" >]-|9s<i 

Assembler syg" 

usp s-tse" 

Mindwalkei s39" 

MICRO SYSTEMS 

Aralyie 'S9" 

SciibWe "59" 

On.Linc/Comm •49" 

Orgilmio Dalo Baso •59" 

Analyze Vorsln 2.0 »129oi> 

V.I.P, 
V.ir> ProlesBlonal 113900 



DISCOVER SOFTWAHE 


M-iraudCJ" II arick'up 


•32" 


ELECTRONIC ARTS 






. 'sa" 


Aichon 


..131" 


One on One 


.,'31" 


Sky Fen , 


..•31" 


Fmanci.il Ciwhbook 


.,<37»» 


Severn Cilioa o( Gold 


..•31" 




..•31" 




..•74" 


Instant Music 


•34" 


Daluxe Video 


.S69" 


INFO COM 






• 31" 


HitcMiiker's Quids 


..•31" 




.-•31" 


F^lanellall 


..•31" 


Witness 


•31" 


MICRO lUUSIONS 




Dynamic.Caii 


•31 BOO 


MINDSCAPE 




Halloy Proiec! 


..•310* 


Doja Vu 


..•34'« 


Keyboard Cadel 


..•29" 



When you want to talk computers. When you want to talk price. 

Call tollf ree: 1 800 233-8950. 

Outside the U.S.A. 717 327 9575 Telex 5106017898 

Educational tnstltutlons call toll^rreo 1 800 221^4283 

CMO, 477 Eaat Third Street, Dept. A401, WHIIam»port, PA 17701 

All m&iOT credit cards accepted. 

POUGY; Afld S^t (iTiinirfLfli^ .B7 00J i^rpfiing ara handi-rig Lilfger srnoments msY nequirp add't'Ofial efi^fges 
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POWER SUPPLY (C-64) 29,95 

1541 (Alignment) 35,00 

CM (Repair) . 44.95 

C-120 (Repair) 95.00 

1541(Repair& Alignment) 75.00 

1571 (Alignment) 40,00 

1571 (Repair & Align) 135,00 

POWER SUPPLY (C-128) 99.95 

PARTS C-64 & C-12fi CALL 

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SMirriNC; A-Ml lUSElLING. ADD tt.H CO.D.'S ACCmU} 
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Al LASTr A FULL IIIPLEMEWTATION of Iti* o/ifllnal EUZA pto- 
aram is now avaiidble to fun on your Commodor* 641 
CrcDled al MIT In ISOS, ELIZA hat became Itie world'-a most 
celFbratedartiric-al inleltigenca demonstraEion progrsin ELIZA is a 
Tion-diTeciive psychotherapist wtio ififily^es 6&£h statemarit as 
you Type ii in anij thfji Tesp'Onds witn her own comment or 
quesiiori--ard har remarks are oftffn amAnngl:^ appropnalie' 
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bcon avdilablfl 1o perianal compuEer uiirs eicept in greAilr 
stripped down vsriioni lachlhQ tne ftctphiitkdtion which rnado Ihe 

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Now, our new Commodore 64 varsfon potiossiing Iha FULL power 

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does it {or teecti tisr lo do miore] we will incEude Ihe oOmpEete 

SOURCE PRO^ftAM lot only $20 adc^itional 

Order your copy ol £LiZA today arid you'll never sgam wonoer how 

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"Much more than a mere game. ..You'll t}0 impressed wiE^ 
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-fC UAGAZifiE 
"Qollgihlful 9rMailainmont...An Ideal mediur> For 9howin{] off vaur 
Syftem' --WCfiOCOMPUTINQ MAGAZINE 

'EliZA IB an aitPunding piece oUoltware . . Afatcinaimg prooratrt 
1 u je and study ' ' - BAROfi 'S MiCPOCOMPU 7£R R£POR T$ 
"ELIZA n a greAl way lo inlroduca your Ff lends lo compulefi. . . A 
very funny party game," ^FETERA. McmLLtAMS 

"ELIZA IS an ejcepTional program, one that's lij>n lo use. shp*! off 
your machine, and rias great hlsloncal interest" 

-POPULAfi COUfUTiNG MAGAZINE 
"This version of EUZA is Ihigbesi we have seen. As a party gamp, it 
itunmalched ' -HOME APPUCATIONS fOR THE CS4 

ELIZA IS AVAILABLE IN THE FOUQWtNQ FORMATS: 
(Plsai* ifwcify Dlikk or Casseilfl) 

1 Protected Vernon $25 

jProtecled Version can tii run bul nol Itttedl or modified] 

J Un - protected Co mjnod pie 64 BASIC Sou rceveral on S46 

(Source Veritpn can 6e luted and mod<iied as well as jun) 
Both versions Include a six page user manual. 
Pfcase add $2.00 shipping and handling lo atr orders 
(CallFornia residents please add 6'/^% sales lax] 

ARTJFICJAL irfTELUGENCE RESEARCH GROUP 

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(213) 656' 7363 (2i3>6M-22t4 

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Incliiaes: "CWlaier," "TriptoWiantis." "Meriyn" 
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538 So. 2nd St. > Albion, NE 68620 

CommMlore 64 is a tis<Jemarn o) commooiiie eleclronics lid. 



Commodore 64 OfllV 

SOFTWARE $4/Disk 

r 003 Best ofTpug-Ulilities, Term 64 (modem 
program) $4 

Z 034 Public '4 - Sampler of various games 
and utilities S4 

C 035 Best of Canada -Games and music S4 

i_. 0S9 The Accountant- Spreadsheet, Checl<- 
tiook balancer, Graphics, Mailing lisl S4 

^. 066 Best Utilities V.I - Copy disks with a 

single drive in 4 minutes $4 

. 075 T he OHIca-Wtordproces5or,C64 Data- 
base, 7 games. Special disk utility program 
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: 1 OSO Superstar Utilities - Dish recovery, La- 
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Space plus 8 other popular games S4 

~ 094,095 Best Utilities V.2 (2 disks) - Com- 
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THE 

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MlEJEIE(n)IE 



$24.9S 

NO FINER OR MORE /VDVANCED ARCHIVAL COPIER AVAItABt£ AT 

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EASY TO USE. DOES NOT CAUSE DRfVE HEAD TO KNOCK. 

COPIES UP TO 41 TRACKS. 

PERIODIC UPDATE POLICY. 

AUTOMATICAUYMAKES BACK-UP COPIES FROM VIRIUAU.VAU. 

PROTECTED SOFTWARE. 

NIBBLES, HALF TRACKS. COPIES EXTRA SECTORS AND EXTT?A TRACKS, 

REPRODUCES ALi DISK ERRORS AUTOMATICAllY. 

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OR COMMODORE 128 AND 1571 DRIVE 




THE ULTIMATE CONTROL INTERFACE 



Compatible with C64, 
C128 in 64 & 128 modes, 
and CI 28 in CP/M mode 



Universally applicable dual 6522 Versatile interface Adapter fVI A) 
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SYMBOL MASTER MULTt-PASS 

SYMBOLIC DISASSEMBLER 

The original and best is now even better with Version 2,0! 
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program into beautifii I source. Includes bath C64 & CI 28 native 
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compatible with your MAE PAL, CBM, DQVOlop.C4, IJ\DS, Merlin or 
Panlher assembfer, ready (or re-assembly and editing, 100% 
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PROFESSIONAL UTtUTIES & RESOURCES 

• 064 Source Code. Most complete available reconstructed, 
enlensively commented and cross-referenced assembly language 
source code lor Basic and Kernal ROMs, all 16K, In book form, 242 
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• PT D-65 lOSymbollcDebuggerfor C64. Anextremelypowerfuilool 
with capabilities far beyond a machlne-languago monitor. lOO-pago 
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• MAE64 version 5,0, Fully professional 6502/650)2 macro 
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SCHNEDLER SYSTEMS 

1S0t N. tvanhoe, Dept. Q-1, Arlingtgn, VA 22205 
Information^eiephone Orders (703) 237-4796. V ISA/MasterCard 




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LATEST 

PRICE 



COMMODORE 1 2B II J 

ttddcmaik Df Commodore Elfctronki, Ltd, 



1571 

DISK DRIVE 

T902 
MONITOR.. 

MPS lOCX) 
PRINTER .. 



1670 
239 MODEM 129 

1 750 RAM 
.279 EXPANDER .169 

1350 MOUSE 
.239 CONTROLLER. 4 4.95 



COMMODORE^ 




NEW 

COMMODORE 64C 

WITH GEOS ... 185 



1350 

MOUSE . .44.95 
1 54 1 C DISK 
DRIVE . . . CALL 



1 802 C 

MONITOR. .209 
1660 
MODEM . 54.95 



j^ EST. 1982 -^^ - 



P.O. BOX T 7882 
fMILWAUKEE,WtS3217 



ORDER LINES OPEN 

MON.-FRl. 1 1 A.M. - 7 P.M. CST 

SAT. 1 2 P.M. - S P.M. CST 



TO ORDER CALL TOLL FREE 



FOR TECHNICAL INFORMATION, 
ORDER INQUIRIES, ORFORIWIS. ORDERS 

800-558-0003 414-351-2007 

ORDEniNQ INFORMATION FOR FAST DELIVERY. SEI4D CASHIER'S CHECK. 
MONEY ORDER OR DIRECT BANK TRANSFER. PERSONAL AND COMPANY 
CHECKS ALLOW 14 BUSINESS DAYS TO CLEAR. CHARGES FOR COD, 
ARE $3,00 IN CONTINENTAL U.S.A. INCLUDE 4'A SHIPPING ON ALL 
ORDERS, MINIMUM S4.0O. MASTER CARD i VISA ORDERS PLEASE 
INCLUDE CARD K, EXPIRATION DATE AND SIGNATURE, Wl RESIDEI^S 
PLEASE ADD 5% SALES TAX. HI, AK. FPO, APO. PUERTO RICO AND 
CANADIAN ORDERS PLEASE ADD 5'/. SHIPPING AND HANDLING. 
MINIMUM $5.00, ALL OTHER FOREIGN ORDERS PLEASE ADD 15%, SHIPP- 
ING, MINII^UM $10.00. ALL GOODS ARE NEW AND INCLUDE FACTORY 
WARRANTY. DUE TO OUR LOW PRICES ALL SALES ARE FINAL, ALL 
DEFECTIVE RETURNS MUST HAVE A RETURN AUTHORIZATION NUMBER. 
PLEASE CALL 414.351-2007 TO OBTAIN A RA« OR YOUR RETURN WILL 
HOT BE ACCEPTED FOR REPU\CEMErn OR REPAIR, PRICES AND 
AVAILABILITY SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE, 

NOTE ON ALL ORDERS OUTSIDE CONTINENTAI. U,S,A. WE SHIP ALL 
ORDERS FIRST CLASS INSURED U.S. MAIL. IF SKIPPING CHARGES 
EXCEED THE MINIMUM AMOUNT YOU WILL BE CHARGED THE ADDI- 
TIONAL AMOUNT TO GET YOUR PACKAGE TO YOU QUICKLY AND SAFELY. 



NO SURCHARGE 
ON CREDIT CARDS. 



m^^i^^i^m-j^iMM 



C6MMOOORE 

SUPER PRtltrrER 
PACKAGES 

NX- 10 PRINTER 

S XETEC ,,„ 

SUPER GRAPHIC ZOV 

PANASONIC toeOI 
aXETEC .-Q 

SUPER OH APHIC £37 



PRINTERS 

PANASONIC 1091 ...219 
SEIKOSHAIOOOVC CAR 
PANASONICIOeOi ..219 
PANASONIC t091l ..279 

OKIMATE20 139 

CITIZEN ROD ....CAU 
OKIDATA120 .... CAU 



COMMODORE 64 & 1 28 



mUOAYCOMMODOSE 128 PACKAGE 

' COMMODORE 128 • MAGNAVOX 8562 

■ t57T DISK DRIVE CT 30 RGB/COMPOSITE 
/ 3 V MONITOR 



ij^j^t^jsi^g^^l^J^ 



551 



AMIGA COMPUTER SYSTEM 
CaH for Price and Availability 



K 



AMIGA SOFTWARE 



X 



STAR MICRONICS 

N>WtO«trf>RICtX 

MX'io tm 

NL-fOC 1T> 

NU-IO CAi-L 

NX-IS J29 

SD-tO 3(K9 

SD-II «I9 

IR-tO 4S« 

SR-IS .' SS9 

POWIRTYPI M9 



• coMMODoRt tza 

COMPUTER 

• 1S7T DISK DRIVE 
•tfrJO MODEM 

■ I90JA RGB MONITOR 

• I7SD RAM EXPANDER 

• USD MOUSE 
-MPS 1000 PRINTER 

CAU. Fos Lf rar psias 



XETECSUPERGRAPHIC 
INTERFACE 69.05 



Hatlltr mii 

Mindihadow i^.'JS 

SorfowecTTrme ..,. 29.95 
Lit°l Comp. People . . 34.95 

Muiic Studio 39,95 

Mastrrtype 27.95 

AOjryif 2,0 94.9S 

VIP PfofesKonal ..169.95 

Racttr 29.95 

WOJia Gjnwi 27.95 

Or-Line 44.95 

ScrltjUr 64,95 

Gamt^taf B;iskett>dll 29.95 

Afchior , 27.95 

One on One 27.95 



7 CitiMOfGoJd 2 7 95 

Siafdfel I 38 95 

Microleague B3!eljall39,95 

Impact 1 29 95 

Computer Baseb^l 27,95 

Shanghai 29 95 

BaUnst o( Power .34 95 

Sfcyfon 27,95 

Artie Foi 27,95 

Marblt MadneM .34 95 
Beturn/AIJijntJi , . . 29,95 
fu\ CookCook - , , . 34.95 
Adventure Consr .27S5 
Cfiessmailet 2000 32.95 
Charrtpionship Goll 36.95 



Celuie Prim 69,95 

Deluxe video 69,95 

Deluxe Paint 69.95 

Pcrnl Ulilrly 1 20,95 

Print Utility 2 20.95 

Aegil Draw I 29.95 

Aegil Anrmat(3r/ 

Image! 9*.9S 

The Pawn 29,95 

Organise , 64.95 

PFjntmasier 32.95 

An Gallery t or 2 , . 19,95 

King Quest II J4 95 

Black Cauldron 34,95 



Ultima3 41.95 

Maxiplan , . , 99.95 

Maitflesk 49.95 

Maxitom 39.95 

Fligtlt Simulator fl .34.95 

Silent Service 37.95 

Mean IS Z7.9S 

Leader Board 27,95 

Wlmet Gamei 27.95 

Rt>gue , , . , , 27.95 

Apifial Tritogy 27,95 

strip Pokef 29.95 

BraiaccdS 34.95 

HaBey's Project 29.95 



MONtTORS 

MAGNAVOX AMBER 89 
MAGNAVOXe562 

RGB/COMP 257 

SAMSUNG 14- 

COMPOSITE 149 

THOMSON 14" 

RCB/COMP ...,,,279 
COMMODORE 

I902A 279 



COMMODORE 64C 
W/GEOS ..CALL 



1541C 

DISK DRIVE CALL 



MODEMS 

Corrmodore 1660., 54,95 
Conmodoie 1670 ... 129 



SAMSUNG 1 4' COLOR : 
COMPOSirE .__-^ 
MONITOR '1 49 



SUPER 



ACTIVISION 



I HOME COMHJTER a>TWARE J 



SPECIALS 

FORC:-64/C-12S 



COMMODORE 
ABASCUS 64 

Clurtpak 31,96 

Cad. Pax 31,95 

Powerplan 31,95 

Super C Compiler ., 44.95 

Super PascH 44.95 

Bajic Compiler ..,,3!. 9 5 
Forth 31.95 

ACCESS 

M.icti V-Catl 21.95 

Lf.nlcr Board 24,95 

TouinJment Drsk . . 16.95 

Tenth Pr,ime 24-95 

Executive Dilk , , . 16,95 
Rat>otrc WdrkLhop C a 1 1 
Triple Pak 14,95 

ACTJVISrON 

SEE SUPER 
SPECIALS 

BERKLEY SOFTWORKS 

Geos 39.95 

Geopubldh 34,95 

Geof.te 34.95 

Geocaic 34,95 

Writer's Wortstiop 34,95 

Geoctian 27.95 

Qeodex 27,95 

Deskpak I 23,95 

Font Pale I 20,95 

BRODERBUrVD 

fl^nk Strret 

Sffi«-£a 34 95 

Graph Libf. 

1.2,3or4 17.95 

Pn. Sh^op 

Companian 27.95 

ToyShcsp 39-95 

Hallcf.ay Gr^ph 

LrOrary ........ 17.95 

Thrnking Cap 34.95 

EPYX 

Fast Lo.id.eart 24,95 

Winter Camel 24.95 

Summer Games 11 ,, 24,95 

Vorpal Utility 22,95 

Mowie Morister .... 24.95 

World Karate 19,95 

Stjper Cycle 24.95 

Champion Wrestling 24 .95 

Worid Games 24.95 

Destroyer ..,.,,.. 24.95 
Graphics Scrapbook 

lorJI 17 95 

: ■ ■ ■ JSjyrtheiPTX srew'j -'"'^^ 
JoyvitfUiv !jn!v :t? ')f, 

W*Wfl Comiirvrd With 

^■.. Any ytiwrt fVWuie . :. 



64 SOFTWARE 
ELECTRONPC A.1TS 

Archon I 1,95 

Aichon li 24 95 

Mule 11,95 

Murder/Zinderneuf 19.95 
Music Construe t ron 11.95 
Prnbal Construction I 1 ,95 

Sky(Oji 24 95 

One on One . , ,.1195 
Seven Cities o) Gold 11,95 
Mail Old, Monilers 11.95 
Martiie Madness . . 22, 9S 

Arctic Fox 24,95 

Amnesia 27,95 

Bards Tale li 27.95 

MoetJius 27.95 

Murder Party 24,95 

RotKit Rascal 27.95 

Uiiimai , , ,27.95 

Racing Destruction TI,9S 
Adventure Conttr. 27.95 
Fin, Cooktiook , , . 27.95 

Bard's r.lle 27.95 

Europe AWa/e 33 95 

ToiKhdown Football 1 1 ,95 
Lords ot Conquest 24.95 
Chessmaster 2000 27.95 
Ultimate Wizard , . . 24.95 
Super Boulderdash 1 1.95 

AutOduel 34.95 

Ogre 27.95 

Heart ot Africa II. 95 

America's Cup 23.95 

Scrabble 23.95 

INFOCOM 

Cantor Items .irntprrcei 

ELEaRIC DREAMS 



TRANSFORMEKS 21.9S 

GAIMMAKERUBRAR* I4,9S 
ROCKT HORROR SHOW 18.95 

JPINDIZIV IB,9S 

TITANIC ie,95 

CRtETlNaCARO 

MAKER 21.95 

LAIrRINTM .,,. 21,95 

HOWARD THE DUCK.. 21.95 



■SUPER SPECIAL PRICES EFFECTIVE NOW 
THRU JANUARY 31, 1987 



CAMEMAKER 


, 24.9S 


LITTU COMPUTER 




PEOfLt 


, 2t.9S 


2 bN 2 BASKETDAIL 


, 21.95 


MURDER ON THE 




MlUISSim 


. II.9S 


HACKERII 


. 21.95 


TASS TIMES 


. 2I.9S 


SHANOMAI 


. 21.9! 


CHAMPIONSHIP 




SASEMiim .... 


. 21.9! 



MINDSCAPE 

Crossword Magic . 34-95 
Perfect Score ... 49.95 

Hailey Project 20.95 

High Rollet 20,95 

Snadowfire 20 95 

Lords or Midnight , 20,95 



MFNDSCAPE 

IntiliratOf 20.95 

Bop 'N' Wreltle 20 95 

Spell/Destruction 20,95 

Faltllght 20.95 

Irwoor Sports 20-95 

American Chailenge 20,95 



EST. 1982 



PO Boi 178K. MilwrnkM. W( 53217 
OHDEn LIKES OPEN 

Mt)H-Fii 11 .1 m -7pm CST •Sal 12 p in - 5 ( tii CSI 



To Order Call Toll Free 

800-558-0003 

For Technical Info. Order 
Inquiries, or lor Wise, Orders 

^^J^¥ 414-351-2007 

SPECIALS 

MICROPROSE 

Silent Service .,,..- 23.95 

Gtinjhip 23.95 

Accrojet 17.95 

TopGunrwr . 17.95 

F-ISSirikeBagle . 23 95 
Kervwdy Approach 17.95 
Crusadeinfurope 27.95 
Conflict in Vietnam 27.95 
Decision in the Desett 27,95 

■ 



OHDERING INFORMATION: pi-'.ih spitiir sisim Fa, lw 

titilive'V ^H^Ki t:i^,iiM- !, ^hech or moiie'/ urd^r Personal iiid 
company cfitcks a-io^. 14 tiu^ir>ess dayi lo clear. Scliool PQ s 
welr.oriie CD clijrgti iri S3 tK In Conitnenial USA incliideSS DO 
(ill sollwaie oiUfii ■V. sliipnmo fui iiaidwaie. mrirmim MOO 
Master Caid anil Visa urcJerspleasEinciiiidecaidir frx[tiia1iori.ilalt> 
iii'ii'.iil[i.iiiiti< WiieMilenlspii'a«eiiitMe5 salitslii HI AK,FPa 
iM^d PiiMiKj Rico tiiiiJ Caiiin1i,an oiilt^ra plcaMi add 5',. shippirio 
rninimurn UOO All rilli^i Ivcgn urilin idtl IS^i tKljtpinB. nlnlRMjm 
S1DQ0. All r^rilrfs snipped CKiETide [tie Ciirilineni.il J S A aie stiip^ 
liiit cUsi in&uiei! U S mail. II Ituwigii shipping clinrflBS cxceeiJ me 
iniiiireiumaiEiciiitit yriit Aillb^rcliarged tlifaddiliunalamuunl logct 
y[3ui eacKa^c Id yd^i [fiLickly ini salely All gootls arc nc'A ar,d 
incliidolooloiv^^'arrFiiily Dii^lpouilowpilcesallsalesarelinal i\ll 
delectlvc relurnt tnuit hive a rBturn amhtirltititn nirailjer, Pl1^^e call 
■ nj iiT-2^'ifj7roobraiiiarjRA if,i >oiirreri,rnrtiiifiott»paccepi^Ej 
I'liii", .iiiil .iv.iiliiWiiy suli|Ktlocliaiii|u wll tnalia: 



Kid I.i!k 39,95 

Speller flee , - 39,95 

Paper Clip Elite S4.95 

Degas Elite 52.95 

Jet 34.95 

Hacker II 34,95 

Zumalont 1.2 or 3 21,95 

Dtlblo 23,95 

SonfK 47 95 

Defender of the 

Crown 34.95 

S.DJ 34.95 

Gato 31 95 

Winnie TJie Pooh ,19,95 
Infocom , , , Call 



DBMan 99 95 

LJlticeC 94 95 

LPDWnter 79.95 

LPD Planner 79,95 

LPD nier 79,95 

Superbase Amiga , . 99.95 
Super Huey 27,95 

Gijmo 34 95 

Digital Link 54,95 

Logistics ,- 169,95 

AutOduel 34.95 

Bard'J tale 34,95 

Music Constr, 20, 69,95 
Aegis Alt vol, I 23,95 

Coveted Mirror , . . 20.95 



C- 128 SOFTWARE 



SupertHSt us ...62,95 

Paper Clip II 49,95 

Wordwrtol28 ,,,44,95 
Data Manager 1 28 44,95 
Fleet Sysitm III ,..,49.95 

HomePak 34,95 

Superscript 1 28 , . . , 54.95 

P^rfea Writer 49.95 

SyMs Porter- 128 .,44.95 

Pocket Filer 2 36.95 

Pocket Writer 2 ,,.36.95 
BasicCompiler I2B 44.95 



Ch3rt-Pakl28 ,...31.95 
Cad-Pakl28 .,,.,44.95 
Super C Compiler , . 44.9S 

CotjdI28 ,. 44,95 

Speed Term 128 ..31,95 
Pocket Planner 2 ,..36,95 

MachV/128 32,95 

Perfect Filer 49,95 

Trinity 27.95 

Swiftcalcl28 44.95 

Vi2rstatt28..,,,., Call 
Partner 128 44.9S 



COMMODORE 

MISCELJJ\r\IEOUS64 

Hiichiker 24,95 

ErKittanter 24.95 

Sorcerer 27.95 

Karaleka 20.95 

Spellt)reaker 29.95 

Leather Goddess . - 23.95 

Moonmist 23.95 

Agatha Christie ,..22.95 
BusineisFormSnop 27.95 
Golden Pass , , . . 29 95 

Kill Until Dead 19,95 

Jel 29,95 

AlEernate Reaity/ 

Cily 24.95 

All. Reality/Dungeon 24.95 

Mercenary 18.95 

221 Baker Street , ,. IB.95 
NevererHjrng Story 18,95 
Fontmaiter 2 . , , , 32.95 
On Court Tennis . , , 20,95 

The Pawn 29 95 

A,C,E, , 16,95 

Ugh! Lab 34,95 

Dimcy Comics Strip 23,95 
Diiney Card* Party 2J,9S 
Dr. Ruth'sGame/Sex 23,95 
Lasser Money Mgr, 47.95 
Guild or Thievel . 29.95 
WWF Micro 

Wrejtling 27,95 

SurflHI I 34.95 

Typ« 27.95 

Battle From 27.95 

Elite 23-95 

Ikarl Warrior 23,95 

flreakthrough . ... 23.95 
Pocket Dictiorsaty , , I 1.95 

2-Pliot 16 95 

Strike Force 16,95 

TIMEWORKS 

Business Systems ., 39,95 
Wordwriter/SpeJI 34,95 
Swiftcaic/Sldeways 27,95 
Data Manager II , . . 27,95 
Sylvia Porter 64 . . . 34,95 

Evelyn Wood 27.95 

Sideways 20.95 

Partner 64 39.95 




No surcharge for MasterCard or Visa 



64 SOFTWARE 
MISCELLAAIEOUS 64 

Tracker , , . . , , , 29,95 

Pet Speed 34,95 

OjilDtd Pdscal 34-95 

HoitiePak 16,95 

I Am The 128 23,95 

Consultant 39-95 

HI- 80 Card 59,95 

Breakers 27.95 

Reach for The Stan 29.95 

Carrier at War 34.95 

Suti logic Foot ball ., 29.95 

Printmaster 21.95 

Aft Gallery I or 2 . 17.95 

Superbase 64 47.95 

Ultima ir 39,95 

UltiflB III 34.95 

Ultima IV 41.95 

Newsroom ....... 34.95 

Clip Art I or 111 19.95 

Clip Art II 27,95 

GraphictExparKJer 23,95 
Certilicate Maker .34-95 
Flight Simulator II ,.34,95 
Brimstone ... 27.95 

IheHoDbil 23 95 

Animation St.ition , . 49.95 

Karate Champ 23,95 

Kung Fu Mastef ... 23.95 

Cominando 23,95 

Tag Team Wrestling 23,95 
Sublogic Basebaa 34 95 

Blaifng Paddles 24,95 

Math Blaster 34,95 

Hardball 19,95 

Fight Night 19,95 

PSI 5 Trading Co, , , 19.95 

Deceptor 19.95 

Ace of Aces 19.95 

Accolade Football , , 19.95 

SSI 

Wizard's Crown ...27.95 
PtolessionalToor Golt 24.95 

Broadsides 24,95 

Field of Fir* 24.95 

Carrier Force 37,95 

ComputerAmt)ush 37.95 

Kamptgruppe 37.95 

Imperium Galacticum24.95 

Phanlaile 24.95 

Phanlasiell 27.95 

MethB'igade 37.95 

Rings o( 2tlflr 27.95 

Gettystjurg 39.95 

Battle Group 39.95 

Shard of Spring .... 27.95 
Roadwar2000 .... 27,95 

Warship 39 95 

Gem stone Healer , ,20,95 



COIVir>UT/\BILITY CHRISTfVIAS SPECI>\L. 



VCE miM£fe> ifMBV 




'■r,r,; 



PLAY '^^f 

AGAINST THE WORLD. 

THEN PLAY AROUND IT. 

With a liltle postage .ind a tot of luck, you could win tfie trip ol a lifelime. 
It's the GRAND PRIZE of the World Games Sweepstakes. An unforgettable 
trip for 4 to Epcot Center ^nd Dfsney Worfd on Continental Airlines. Or 
two trips for 2 anywhere in the continental U.S. And tast. but definitely 
nothing to gripe about, 100 World Games T-Shirtj. Entries must be receiv- 
ed by February 1 5. 1 987. No purchase necessary. 
A GAMEY OFFER, fluy 2 of the Games Series |one must be World GamesJ 
between September 1 . 1 986 and SarxjaxY 30. 1 987. -^ K 1 1 \ / 

and gel a third absolutely free. See specially marked f) |\l I Y 

boxes Of participating dealers for details. _ ^" 

■■ T^ EACH 



FOR COMMODORE 64/ I 28 



Caii i 



ORDER THESE NEW 
HIT TITLES TODAY 



EST. 1982" 



1 -800-558-0003 

RoxA^dies of the Ring — 

Championship 
Wrestling™ 




Championship Wrestling' 



• Take on Eight of the Meanest 
Rogues o) the Ring. 

• Every Wrestling Move Known 
to Man — and a Few That 
Aren't. 

• The Crowd Hurls Insults, the 
Ropes Vibrate on Impact — 
Real Professional Wrestling 
Action. 

• Wrestle Tougher Opponents, 
TillYoure C\K\\ V 
the Champ! WIML 1 

•One or Two $ ^ A Qi^ 
Player Game. * X ■f' 

New From EpYX 



[ 



ORDER THIS NEW HIT TITLE TODAY 



Call 



AVAILABLE FORCOMfutODOHE6V128 



EST. 1982- 



LLoinpu t(ftbLLLtu^ 

1 -800-558-0003 







THE EPYX 

500XJ™ 
JOYSTiCK 



COMPATIBLE WITH 

COMMODORE 

64/ 128 COMPUTERS 

• The only joystick actually designed to fit in the palm of 
your hand. 

• Trigger finger firing for faster, more accurate shooting. 

• Tactile response switches on top for faster, more precise 
movements, 

• Microsw/itches guaranteed for ten million uses. 

• Unique shafts switches allow you to not only feel but 
hear each move of the 

BUY THE EPYX 500XJ $ 1 ^95l 



Stock for exacting 
control. 



Call 



JOYSTICK FOR ONLY 
With the 

Purchase of 



^.yspyx 



Title 



EST. I982- 



'^oinpu t(fkbiLitu^ 
1 -800-558-0003 



Destroyer 




Life, Liberty, 
And Tlie 
i*1appiness 
of Pursuit. 

• World War \\ action- 
slmulatlon aboard a U.S. 
Naval Destroyer, 

• Graphic action and realism 
unmatched In a simulation 
game, 

■ Command the entire ship, 
or man any of 1 3 Different 
Stations: Torpedoes, Aft 
Guns, Anti-Aircraft. 

■ Seven different missions: 
from the simple Subhunter 
to the most r^ Kl I V 
difficult Con- LJIN L T 
voyEscortorj^ -gg 



Pilot Rescue. 



24' 



Destroyer™ IMew From EpYX 
I ORDER THIS NEW HIT TITLE TODAy| 

^^ nn AVAILABLE FOR COMMODORE 64/ 1 28 

Cam 

EST. 1982- 



'^omput^hiUtu^ 

1 -800-558-0003 



H USE AISLE 12 

a ORrVE UMTS M LESS 



WmUlH MTWUT IW eKEAT 



iE POUTE 

rEVBMNEHflSTOMirr 



^{ 









^3^ 



Si 



WWW"* 



lyiio needs this? 

When you can solve disk drive alignment problems 
in 60 minutes with the CSAf program. 



Disk drive alignment problems? 
Drive out of alignment again? 
Tired of waiting two weeks or 
more to get your drive fixed?? 

WE HAVE THE ANSWER I I 

Wilti mc 1541 DISK DRIVE ALIGNMENT PROGRAM yoy 
can aliQri Ihe drive yoursetl in an hour or so. Nol only that, 
you can do it at home AND no special oquipmonl is (e- 
Quired. Anyonfi with averaQo rnecnanical skills can do itl! 



Read What Computel's Gazette 
had to say. (Oct., 1964) 

". . . with 1541 Disk Ofive Alignment Irom C$M 
Software, you can tix it [the disk drive) yourself in 
an hour or so and ttie program will pay for itself 
ttre first time you use it. . No tectinioal expertise is 
required to accomplisii If^e alignrrtent procedures, 
and the manual accompanying t^e program 
thoroughly describes trte procedures " 



1541 DISK DRIVE AUGNMENT PROQRAM • VERSION 2.0 - S44.95 ptuM ahlpptng 



CAnTRIDGE BACKER II 

PACKAGE INCLUDES: 
1 EXPANSION BOARD. PROGRAM DISK 
AND USER'S MANUAL 

2. CAOTRIDQE BACKER software lo backup 99% 
ol Itie inosi popular CB* canrrdges lo disk 

3. SOFTWARE TO BACK UP MANY DISK 
PROGRAMS 

4. SOLD FOR ARCHIVAL USE ONLYi 

SS4.9S plus shipping 



PROGRAM PROTECTION MANUAL 
FOR THE G-M VOLUME U 

Not Jusi a third edition — a naw and uplo-dato manual 
covering ih« lalest advances >n program proteaion Over 
275 pages ol valuablo inlormation Topics include; 

• ENCRYPTION AND DECRYPTION 

• UNDOCUMENTED OPCODES 

• GCR RECORDING 

• CUSTOM DOS ROUTINES 

• CARTRIDGES AND EPROMS 

• PROTECTING YOUR OWN SOFTWARE 

• TIPS FROM EXPERTS ON 

PROTECTION, BACKUPihiOm 

• DISK INCLUDED 

$34.95 plus shipping 



SKAPSHOT 64tm 

SNAPSHOT 64 is a new utility tDackup program 
that literally takes a 'SNAPSHOT' of your com- 
puter's memory. This snapshot is then saved 
to disk with an autoboot so that it may be easily 
loaded back in. It does all this automatically and 
easily. 

• EASY TO USE. TAKES ONLY 
3 ■ 5 M/WUTES. 

• BACKS UP MANY MORE PRQGRAt^S 
THAN SIMILAR UTILITIES 

• SOLD FOR ARCHIVAL PURPOSES ONLY 

• EXCLUSIVE FEATURE ■ ALLOWS YOU TO 
STOP MOST PROGRAMS AT ANY POINT 
EXAMINE THE COMPUTERS MEMORY. 
AND THEN RESTART THE PROGRAM. THIS 
IS A VERY VALUABLE FEATURE FOR 
THE HACKERii 

$49.95 plus shipping 



PROGRAM PROTECTION MANUAL 
FOR THE C-64 VOLUME I 

• A MUST FOR BEGINNERS 

• THE PERFECT INTRODUCTION 

TO PROGf^AM PROTECTION 

• DISK INCLUDED 

$29.95 plus shipping 



SNAPSHOT 
ENHANCEMENT DISK 

The perfect addition to the best selling memory 
back up tool. Includes fast loader, cartridge 
maker, file examiner and more. 

$f4.00 plus shipping 



VISA AND MASTERCARD ACCEPTED 

Shipping $3.50 par item in U.S.; foreign ordeta extra 



^" is a registered tradeniark ol Commodore Business Machines. Inc. 

Available through your local software dealer or call: 

CSM SOFTWARE, INC. 

POST OFFICE BOX 563. CROWN POINT IN. 46307, PHONE (219) 663-4335 



^ 



Tha company (or 126 softwarei 

Suptr DItk LIbrtrlin ■ A full featured disk 
cataloging & library system for tlie Cf2B. 
Catalog jp to 1000 disks & 14,400 program 
names! Operates in fast mode witti SO column 
display. Catalogs 64, 128 & CP/Kfl Plus 
formatted disk directofiesf Printer output o( 
library index, full library report, master 
program list, category program list & disk 
labels. Also contains full featured disk utilities 
section includira rename a disk, copy protect a 
disk, change disk format & much, mucti morei 
Organize your disk library & more lor only 
$29,951 

1 Ml /1 571 Drlv( AHonmenl - Avoid costly repair 
Pillsl Insure maximum performance from your 
disk drive. Video & audio prompts alert you to 
the alignment condition of ttie drive. Easy to 
use! On-screen help available while 
performing alignment. No more frantic 
searches through sketchy documentation. 
Works on 1541, 1571 in 1571 or 1541 mode, C64, 
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in minutes! Only S34.9S! 

Th«GrialW!r-WWIstrate9y9amefortheC128 
in 128 mode. Manuever corps sized units 
represent ing armies of 17 countries over hi-res 
maps of 1914 Europe, Terrain, weather, 
combat effectiveness, mobility, lines ot supply, 
political considerations & your strategy are 
among the factorsthat affect the outcome. Can 
you change the course of history? Two player, 
one player & save game features included. As 
the first commercial game for the C128 in 128 
mode. The Great War is also a collector's item. 
Disk - S29.95 

BASICally Simple IZE - How to use all Basic 7.0 
commands in Basic programs. Clear, concise 
instructions, flundreds ol pre-programmed 
examples! EssentiaUor every 128 ownerl Disk 
-S19.95 

Great 64 softwarel 

Free Spirit's Music o< the Masters series is a 
must for all music lovers. An hour of classical 
music on disk for the CM orC128in64 mode. 
Mutic ol Ihe Miiint I - hiandel. Haydn. Mozart, 
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Beethoven, Chopin, Schubert & many ottiers. 
Muilc ol M Mltltrt III - Mostly Mozart. 
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S9.95 per disk, 2 tor S 1 7.95, 3 lor S24.95, all four 
disks only S31.95! 

The Winning Edga • Teaches how the experts win 
big money at gambling. The most 
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program ever olfered' Included is simulated 
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the casino. Try this program & you'll be 
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disk - $19.95 

FREE SHIPPING & HANDLING! Illinois residents 
add 8% sales lax. Send check or money order 
(o: 

Free Spirit Sohwira, Inc. 

538 S. Edgewood 

La Grange. IL 60525 



SEASONS GREETINGS 



^M< 



ABACUS 

Ada Training Course S29.95 

Basic 128 42.95 

Basic 64 29.95 

Cadpak 128 45.95 

Cadpak64 29.95 

Cadpak 64 w/ Light P8n 69.95 

Chanpak 128 29.95 

Cfiartpak 64 29.95 

Cotwl 29.95 

Personal Porflolio Manager. . . 29.95 

Powerplan 29.95 

Super C Compiler 64/f 28.. ,. 42.95 

Super Pascal 45.95 

Techinicai Analysis System. . . 45.95 

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Is Carmen Sandiaoo 29.95 

P/S Library 1-2-3 15.95 

Print Shop 26.95 

Print Shop Companion 21.95 

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General Managers Disk $24,95 

Micro League Baseball 24.95 

Team Disks 16,95 

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Brother 15, 25, 35 5.95 

Commodore 1525 6.95 

Commodore 1526 6,75 

Epson 185 6,95 

Epson 85 4.95 

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Epson mx, fx. rx, 1x80 4.75 

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Juki 600D 4,95 

Juki 6100 3.95 

Legend 880, 1080, 808 6,75 

MPS 801 5,75 

MPS 803 6,95 

OKI 182. 192 9,75 

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SG 10-15 2,25 

fW/n. 6 per order) 

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Hifchhicker's Guide 21.95 

Invisiclues (all) 6.00 

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Trinity 128 24.95 

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Superscript 128 47.95 

Superscript 64 46.95 

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Data Manager II 29.95 

Partner 128.. 42.95 

Swift Gale 128 w/Sideways. , 42.95 

Swift Gale 64 w/ Sideways. , , 29,95 

Word Writer 128 w/ Speller, . , 42,95 

Word Writer 64 w/ Speller. . . 29,95 



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Pocket Filer 128 $31.95 

Pocket Filer 64 24.96 

Pocket Planner 128.... 31.95 

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Clip Art 1 $20.95 

Clip Art II 24.95 

Newsroom 30.95 

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ACCESS 

Leader Board, ,$24.95 

Leader Board Tournament Disk.. , 14.95 

Mach 128 30,95 

Mach 5 21,95 1 

ELA 

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Lords ot Conquest 24.95 

Movie Maker 24,95 

Chessmaster 2000 26,95 

Mind Mirror 21.95 

Ultimate Wizard 19.95 



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Commando 21,95 

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Super Bowl 1985 Teams 12.95 

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Advance Music Systems 49,95 



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, 7,95 
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Consultant 64/128 $39.95 

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Infiltrator 18.95 

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EPYX 

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Vorpal 21.95 

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C-128 CALL 

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Hacker 27,95 

Mindshadow 27.95 

Music Studio. 37.95 

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Archon 29.95 

Deluxe Paint 72,95 

Skytox 29.95 

Rogue 24.95 

Temple of Apshal Trilogy 24.95 

Master Type 24.95 

Halley Protect 29.95 

Racter 32.95 

SSI 

Battle 01 Antietam $29.95 

Carrier Force 36,95 

Kampfgruppe ,. 36.95 

Phantasie II 24.95 

Rings of Zelphin 24.95 

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VizaStar 128 $79,95 

VizaWrite 128. 59.95 



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Zorkll 

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S11 
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NOTE: ALL SOFTWARE 
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Math VI 
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Science I 
S o i onoo It 



$3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
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3 
3 
3 
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IBM 5051 X.yboord BOO 

fo. IBM Clonti) 



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CYBER 

SYSTEMS 



C-128 CPM Programs 



101010:BPttEP f20\ 

'JIows preparalion olMBASIC* ascii pro- 
grams with the CPM* text editor from 
module libraries using labels instead ol 
line numbers. Eases the problems 
associated with building new programs 
and modifying old ones. 

101020: BPOST S20 

Companion program to BPHEP builds a 

module library from a working MBASIC 

program, 

I01030:BPli£P/BPOST Package S30 

BPREP and BPOST soon to be available in 
C-128* and C-64* versions. 

103010: MATH-1 SIS 

The lirst of a series of mathematics 
packages. This set computes the Exponen- 
tial, Geometric, and Polynomial Regres- 
sion of a set of points and the simultaneous 
solution of a series of linear equations. 

C'128 Programs 



203010:MATH-1 SIS 

Refer to description above. 

Send SASE for expanded descriptions and 
complete program list, 
■^trademarks: C-S4/C-128 Commodore, 
CPM-Digiial Research, MBASlC-MicroSoft 



3613 S. 75 E.Ave. 
Tulsa, OK 74145-7735 
Tel: (918) 251-5171 



3M Diskettes 

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Other 3M computer products 

S'/V 5DSDD-RH-KA S0.93 each 

3Vi" 3SSIWD-KA , , SI .36 each 

8- BSSSD-KA 51.48 each 

9" 8SSDD-KA $1 .79 each 

5'.'*' head cleaning kit H-KA. . , S4.95 each 

DC300XL-KA data cartridge ... SI 7.95 ea 

Minimum order 100 disl<etles/iO cartridges 

Credit card orders call 

aaO-U5A-DI5Kor800-CA1-DISK in Canada 
For intormation call 313-973-3888 

Communications Electronics Inc. 

P.O Bos 10a5 D Ann Arbor. Mlch'Oan 48106-1045 

Dysan 

Diskettes 

Now get wholesale pricing on Dysan 
diskettes from Communications 
Electronics Inc. while quantities 
last. Lifetime warranty and packed 
10 to a carton with color coded 
diskette ID labels, write protect 
tabs, and heavy duty Tyvek" tear 
resistant envelopes, 

5'A" SSDD BO VI 87 -KA SI. 69 each 

5Vt" DSDD 802O6O-KA $1 .99 each 

5VV DSDD96 TPI 802067-KA . , . S2.29 ea. 
Headcleaning kit DHCK-KA. .. £9.99 each 

Dysan Diskettes 

Credit card orders call 

80O-USA-0ISK or flOO-CAl -I>ISK in Canada 

For information call 313-973-8660 

Communtcations Elaclronic* Inc. 
P.O. Boi 1045 n Ann Arbor. Micnigan rtaiO6i045 




CEI now offers a once in a lifetime offer on 
100% certified and error-tree 5Vj" single 
sided double density diskettes for only 
2511 each in multiples ot 500 diskettes. If 
you want double sided double density 
diskettes these are on ly 27C each in multi- 
ples of 500 disks. Write protect iabels 
included, Auaiiable only in multiples of 
500 diskettes. Sincequantitiesare limited, 
stock up now. 

5%- SSDD MAX1 D-KA S0.25 each 

5'A" DSDD HflAX2D-KA S0.27 each 

BIG SAVINGSl 

Credit card orders call 

aooUSA-QISK or800-CA1-DISK In Canada 

For inlormation call 313-973-8888 

Communications Electronics Inc. 
P.O. Bo» 1045 D Ann Arbot, Michioiin 43106-10^6 



How to order 

To get Ihe fasEest delivery of your diskettes, phone 
your order drrectly lo our order desk and charge it to 
your credit card. Wntlen purchase orders are accep- 
ted Jrom approved governmoni agencies and most 
welt rated firrns al a 10% surcharge for net VO billing 
For maximum savings, your order should be tjrepaid 
All sales are subject to availabilily, acceptance and 
verktlcathon. All sales are lir^al. All prices are In U,S 
dollars Prtoes, terms and specilicationsare subject 
10 change without notice. No rainchecks on out ol 
stocKiterrs. Not responsible for (ypographic^ilOfrors. 
AS5.O0 addttional handling f€it? witJ bocha/gedfurall 
orders wtlh a merchandise total under £50 00. All 
Shipments aro F.O.S CEI VM^rehouso in Ann Arbor, 
Michigan. No COD's. Non-certified checks require 3 
weeks bank clearance fvlichigan residents add 4% 
sales tajt or supply yourtait ID number and reason tor 
lax exemplion. 

For ihlpplng chvrgvB addS6 00 piir 1 00 diskettes 
and/or any trjiction ot 100 S'^-mch or 3'T'tnch disk- 
ettes. Add $ t 00 per data cartridge or head cleaning 
Kit for U.P-S. ground shlpptrifj and handling jn the 
contkn^nlal U.S. For Canada. Puerto Rico. Hawaii, 
Alaska, or APO/FPO delivery, shipping is tftree times 
Ehe continental U.S. rate. 

Mall orden lo: Communications Electronics inc-. 
BoKl045,AnnArbor, Michigan*JSl0e-l045USA II 
you have a Discover, Visa or Master Card, you may call 
and place a credit ciird order. Order toll-free in the 
U.S. DihiI 800-USA-OI.SK. In Canada, ordef loll-tree by 
calling 600-CA^ DISK. ttyouarooulsidetheU S. onn 
Michignndial Jl3-973i!Dee- TtfJflK anytime 671 0155 
(8710155 CE UW> Ordoryour disks from CEI now 

Copyrlflht © 1986 CEI Ad #0524B6*KA 



Vetbatim BASF 

Diskettes Diskettes 



Take acivantage of this Verbatim Val- 
uelife triple special. As long asquan- 
titles last, you'll first get higti quality 
Verbatim diskettes at only 79G each. 
Second, on your order of Verbatim 
5V4" single sided double density disks 
you'll get a FREE plastic storage 
case that holds 10 diskettes, and 
third, you'll also get a FREE head 
cleaning kit. Order Verbatim today 

SVi- SSDD 29633-KA S0.79 eacti 

Verbatim Value! 

Credit card orders call 

SOO-USA-DISK or 800-CA1-DISK in Canada 

For Intormatlon call 313-973-8868 

Corr\munlcstlorts Electronics Inc. 
PO Bo« 1045 □ Ann Arboi. Michigan 48106-1045 



CEI iias a super special deal from BASF 
As long as quantities last, wtien you order 
BASF 5%" Single sided double density 
disks from CEI, you'll get a special price of 
only 690 eacti. And if you order promptly, 
asa (uriher bonus will le limited quantities 
last, you'll also get a free 10 pack plastic 
Ilbrarycase. Stock up now at ttiis fantastic 
tow price on BASF Qualimetric Diskettes 
with a BASF lifetime warranty. 

5V." SSDD 54974- KA S0.69 each 

BASF SAVINGS! 

Credit card orders call 

BOO-USA'DISKoreoO-CAI-DISK tri Canada 

For Information call 313-973-8888 

Communtcalloni Elactronlci Inc. 

P.O Bon 104S □ AnnAiboi. Michigan 461 06-1 045 



Super Disk 
Diskettes 

Super Disk"^ celebrates their anniversary 
with super special pricing on Super Disk 
brand 1 00% certified error- free and drop- 
out ireecofnpuler diskettes. Slock up now 
at these super special prices. Order oniy 
in multiples of tOO diskettes. 



lupw CM**. 

prl«« 



SSS5So!t Secret* «gD Rinflfl*t».i tOpAC*. MSH-tUt 

Sime At a^Mvii bui bulk ipKm w,'? *fiy«IO(]# Ufl7-KA 

DSDD Sai't3HriVM,'HubMi'^H«[ff'i iQuc-'k U«1'KA 

^^HO iot \&M PC/'^T ' tiul^ pACh H47'KA 

saNDina tf^n ■ ^uih pock tDU^KA 

DS^Diit3^ TPn ■ tMh p«Ch t33MU 

ffn*.* i»i>»tt» «ft.0icf>« ■ TOD c«f «t CVS'IU 



fl33 

6? 

ID? 

1 U 
'OOO 



SSSD - Sip^pJs S.-aoU SifljjJe Dtfts^fj. SSOO ^ Sifl^ir SiQwdDuutHe DerM^itf 

Credit card orders call 

800-USADtSK oraoO'CAIorSK In Canada 

For Information call 313 973-8380 

Communications Electronics Inc, 
PO Boa 1045 G Ann Aibor, Michigan 46 106*1 04S 

TDK 

Diskettes 
96 TPI 

If you need a 96 tracks per inch diskette, 
CEi now has an excellent price on boxed 
TDK product. This product is designed to 
store up to 780 Kb. for non-AT systems. 
300 oersteds. Lifetime warranty and 
packed 10 to a carton witti coior coded 
disl(ette tD iabels, write protect tabs, and 
heavy duty Tyvek* tear resistant envelopes. 
5V4-SSDD96TPI M1 DX-S-KA S0.89 each 
5Vi" DSDD96TPI M2DX-S-KA. . . SO. 99 each 

TDK Best Buy 

Credit card orders call 

SOO-USA-DISK or BOO-CA\-DISK in Canada 

For intormatlon call 313-973-88BB 

CommuntcationK Elactronici Inc, 
P O. Box 1045 D Ann Arbot, Michignn 481 0B-tO45 

Fuji 

Diskettes 

Fuji diskettes imported from Japan, 
are now available from CEI at a 
special price wtiilequanties last. Fuji 
diskettes are packaged 10 to a car- 
ton and come witti color coded disk- 
ette ID labels, write protect tabs, and 
heavy duty Tyvek^' tear resistant 
envelope. Order your bisks today. 
5V4" SSDD MD1 D-KA . , . S0,74each 
5V4" DSDD IWD2 D-KA ,. . S0.84 eacti 

Fantastic Fuji! 

Credit card orders call 

eOO-USA-DISK or aOO-CAI-DISK In Canada 

For information call 313-973'B888 

Communication* Elsctronlci Inc. 
P O Box 1045 Q Ann ArBof, Miciilgan 48106-1045 




EXCITING 

COMPUTER 

SIMULATIONS 



from 






Ara Avtii«b'e from SlGf^AL COMPUTER CONSULTANTS. 
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ColcHT TV at 

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Adhplad ic-t hcfnt computaini by datiEirn*r» of iyi- 
tainnt tof m.BfDc raJn^ada. UUIH HtTATCHtlt lacth" 
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Comniodor* #4 and Ala*i SOO. BOOKL vamnn* 
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CGm-c^aro &ii\2B, tnaVs cnl^ ore r&ason why its the r.sst popuar 
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en'r^ of oiinflr SYSOPs. Users :av9 B'ua Bca'fl's po^er-pack^ on- 
line (uncti&n$ ihat re^iliy lei tiem gel the messaga across, or just 
p'an have ft^i H&re a'e fjst a lew c' tie leaiu'K tTal awit ^■ou: 

SYSOP dsflrubM sysl^m m^js^jg^a and menu? * up lo 2i:i sub- 
board^ ■ full t(Fature4 us^r edltirtg ■ Mil In terminal p<omam > over 
200 us*r$ ■ ovpf SOD messages ♦ saibble" SKllon * voljng sccEipn 
• XMODcU & ASCII fiW transfer availat}l« witR ? drives. ■ 
3(H]' 1200 baud * gel ih« board mat gives you compieta conirai! 
p 

a« Bli'; rj'i en a Cf-4 or C f^fl 1,06* no*^ rtqixw OTe Of ho 1 5< 1 ff 1 &J 1 



$69 



yO pufCh«»Ofd»«*. 

i. " ^^'^ FOR btcpE HFOflMATlOM WfUTg Ofl CAUj 



■ SOTA t!ompii1anE Syslcm.s Limited BM 

3:tcn en 1 V jiki'inrr, n t | Crvj^*: w 6 , 

ifJ]i-< I (.■.iri,-.,1.i' VY<; :AS I Vi'..ic.i' 

C.e3-igi^ y PMOrJE; (504) 600-5OO9 yM.^'ivfCardy 



FREE7DISKETTES 



SAUE HONEY I C64 antt VIC 20 users can 
use the diskette (lip side, if anothef 
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TOP NOTCH - by (HJOHUH 
quickly solves ttiat problem. 
1 f^K ills like FREE DISKETTES' 
I ^^^L]_ • stainless Steel Guide 
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INDUSTRIAL STATION PO BOX 2134- CZ 
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i, $7.95 




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each 



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For your COMMODORE 128 



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Put Your Computer's Commands Where They Belong - And Your Manuals On The Shell, 

Have you ever sat at your computer with the manuat in your lap trying to 11 nd an elusive command? How much 
time have you lost searching thiough manuals to refresh your memory on how to do wtiat you wanted? Now 
you havof^way to endlhatfruslration - Leroy's Chealsheels^ 

Leroy's Cheatsheets help you got into your program rigtit away. We put the command!^ rig hi at your 
fin^enrps. actual keystrokes are in bold type, variables are shown in italics. Designed by sot^are experts, our 
durable plastic laminated overlays are comprehensive roloronco aids which documoni a product or system 
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a FREE CHEATSHEET 

We carry a corrpleta line ol software al 
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/our choicoi CALL or WRITE TODAY tor 
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Made ol sturdy vinyl coatffd >to*ls[rong enough (or an/ computer 

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Order Now and Save ... Monev. Time and Frustration 



COMMODORE 128 $7.95 ea 



DIE -CUT 



3 Basic 7.0 

G Blanks l3.h>DTlm.r^M( 

Mtf J Dila ManaQtirlSa 

a Disk 1571 

a E.isy Scrip! 

"•a Ellla 

U Fli>ut syslem 2 & 3 



U For TT^e Beg^aner 
□ Multip;a.Tl& 
»□ Pi pciback Writer 

'3 Paperclip 123 
Q Supeibass \iB 

"G SufwTBCrlpt 12B 
a WordpiotSa 



w-UI Flldhl SJmulilor 2 '••D Word Wiliw IJB 
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COMMODOHE 64 $3.95 ea 



cur CUT TOUflaiF Oh £!OTT E n lINtS 



□ Ba$ic2.a 

S Blanks iiwTu 
ma Oiti Minigef/2 
a Diik1641 

U Doodls 
G Easyscripl 
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U Floelsystem 2 
'J Flight Simolaloi 2 
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""'J OEOS 

J t.^Ljl!;plajl 

"■* J Newaroom 

""• J Paperback Wrllw 

U Paperclip 

LI Sky Travel 

□ SpOfldscript 

LJ Sup4iba3aQ4 

"» U Supirtcrlpt M 

■"" LJ Word Wrllm 



Alw IMl Mw COMMODORE MC 



PfotHjoror--'. woojMifi HOUFIS 7;30A>J SPM EjUflfn Tlih.* i^^-xi-v/y 



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C- COMMODORE SOFTWARE 

YOUR CHOICE OF THE FOLLOWING 
Z. 99 EACH 



•CM 

Blu6 Print (R) 
Clowns IR) 
Dragons Den (Bj 
Easy Finance I, II, III 
Easy Mail (D) 
English Itl (D) 
English V (D) 



English VII ID) 
Ffog master (R) 
Gortek & The Microchips (C) 
Jupiter Lander (R) 
IV& V(D) Kickman(RI 

Lazarian (R) 
Music Machine (R) 
Math Vllt (Dl 



Pet Emulator (0) 
Pilot (D) 

Screen Editor (D) 
Sea Wolf (R) 
Star Ranger (R) 
Suspended ID) 
Super Smash (R) 
Tooth Invaders (Rl 



Word/Name Machine ID) 
Visible Solar System (R| 

*PLUS-4 

Script Plus (Rl 

Letter Sequences/Lonnor shon (D/CI 
Shapes &■ Pattoms/cmup it (D/C) 
Jack Attack (D) 



TOP 

AMIGA SOFTWARE 

Leader Board Golf S 29 

Utile Computer People .... $ 29 

Music Studio $ 29 

Deluxe Paint $ 72 

Art Disk Vol. I $ 24 

Deluxe Print S 72 

Aft Disk Vol. II.. S 24 

Deluxe Video S 72 

Instant Music . . , . , S 39 

Marble Madness $ 32 

Winter Games S 32 

Hitchhiker's Guide To 

The Galaxy S 32 

Lattice C Compiler $119 

A-Copier $ 32 

Silent Service $ 32 

3-D Graphics Ubrary $ 39 

VIP Professional $159 

Marauder $ 32 

Grabbit $ 24 

Amiga Macro Assembler . . $ 79 

Amiga Pascal $ 79 

Amiga LISP $159 

AEgis Animator $1 09 

AEgis Draw SI 59 

Typing TutorAA/ord 
Invaders S 27 

HARDWARE 

256K Color Amiga 

System CALL 

256K Amiga CALL 

A1010 3'A" Disk Drive , . .CALL 

A1080 Color Monitor CALL 

A1050 256K Expansion . . . CALL 



HITS 

C64/12S SOFTWARE 

All ABACUS Titles CALL 

All MASTERTRONICS 

Titles CALL 

World Karate 

Championship S29 

Winter Games S26 

The Toy Shop $45 

Gettysburg: 

The Turning Point $45 

10th Frame S29 

World Games $29 

Road War 2000 $29 

Gemsione Healer ..,.,,..., $29 

Destroyer $29 

Shard of Spring $29 

Hardball $25 

Commando $25 

Gunship $25 

Fontmaster II $32 

GEOS $49 

F-15 Strike Eagle $25 

Fast Hack'em $29 

Merlin 64/1 28 $39 

Copy 1)64/128 $39 

Newsroom $39 

Print Shop $35 

Print Shop Companion $28 

Print Master $27 

HARDWARE 

D 64 C Computer CALL 

D 1541 C Disk Drive CALL 

C-1 28 Computer CALL 

VIC-1571 Disk Drive CALL 

VlC-1581 Disk Drive CALL 



iB 



P.Q 



ABBYS 

SUNCOM 

Party Quiz $14.95 



MINDSCAPE 
[Eduutkmal - Age 4 Id i 

Tink's Adventure 

Tuk Goes to Town 

Tinka's Mazes 

Tonk in the Land of 

The Buddy Bots 

(Age 8 to tZ) 

Mr. Pixel's Paint Set 

Mr. Pixel's Cartoon Kit . . . 
Show Director 

DATASOFT 

O'Riley Mine 

Dallas Quest 

Mancopter 



. S6.95 
.$6.95 
. $6.95 

.$6.95 

. $9.95 
.$9.95 
.$9.95 

.$5.95 
.$5,95 
.$5.95 



SPECIALS 

TIMEWORKS 

Money Manager |D&C> . . .$5.95 
Electronic 

Checkbook IDEfO $5.95 

Data Manager (D&C) $5.95 

MEMOREX DISKS 

MD-l - Work System $18.95 

(20 5W" Disks & 50 File Box) 

MD-2 - Word System .... $21 .95 
(20 5'/4" Disks & 50 File Box! 

MEMOREX PAPER 

100 Sheets 20 Lb. Ivory .$ 2.45 

100 Sheets 20 Lb. White S 2.45 

250 Sheets 15 Lb. White S 3.95 

1000 Sheets 20 Lb. White $10.95 



RIBBONS 

Commociore - 1525 . . 
Comrrodoro ■ 1526/B02 
Commodore MPSBOt 
Commodore - MPS-803 
Epson MX^RX/FX - 80 . 

Okimatc 10 -Color 

Star Powertyp© ...... 

SG-10 Black 

SG-10 Color- 

• Please State Choice of 



.5 7.50 
.S 7.00 
i 7.50 
.S 9.00 
,S 5.00 
.S 6.00 
.5 6,00 
.S 2.50 
.S 3.50 



Color 



DUST COVERS 

Amiga System Pack $29.00 

Amiga 1010 Disk Drive $ 8.00 

C 128Computof $ 800 

1541 Disk Drive S 7.00 

1571 Disk Drive $ 8.00 

1702 Monitor »10.00 

VIC 20J64 Computer * 7.0O 



PRINTERS 
Others Available - Please Call 

Star MicronicsLV-l 210 SI 79 

Star Micronics NL-10 $229 

Star Micronics NX-1 $239 

Star Micronics SG-1 OC $229 

Star Micronics SG-1 5 $369 

Star Micronics SR-15 $599 

Epson FX-aS $399 

Panasonic - 1091 $239 



a 

■■I 

B 
i 

■r 
■I 

8 

■■ 
IB 

■■ 



CALL ON THESl AND OTHtR 

PRODUCTS. WE CAEIIY A 

COMPLETE LIK OF 

SOFTWARE MO HAROWARE 



I 

■ 

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ALL TITLES ON DISK UNLESS MARKED (R) FOR ROM CARTRIDGE £r (C) FOR CASSETTE TAPE 
Order Line WE CHECK FOR STOLEN VISA £r MASTERCARD Customer Service 

1-800-282-0333 m f in « ^ j. „ ™ - q-. ku^ pt ^ °^'° Residents 

ORDERS ONLY! Sales Personnel Do ^'^ " ^""'^ P'"' ®*'*' ^^^ ^^ 1-513-879-9699 

Not Hawe Information on 37 s. Broad Street, Fairbom, OH 45324 

Previous Orders or Product Specs. ' ' 

I SOFTWARE ONLY - Prspakt iHdsrs ovsr *S0 nicsive frw shlpfilnB via UPS In CDnltnsntal U.S. Plaxa wM %l ordan undat M4. HARDWARE and all 

DfdarsraqutrlngshlpmanlvtaU.S. Poll Offkawa lubjact taaddilionat frafghl chargai. Add M for COD ofcfvr*. VISA/MaKafCard ordara add «2 larvico 

r. Ohio resldanla add B.5% anlai lax. Peraonar crmcka rocjuira a Ihrac-waok WAlt^n^ (larlod- No waitinfj whan paid tiy credit card, ceniflad clieck 

, lay ordor. All llami •ufa^cl to availability ant) ptic* chanflB. PLEASE CITE AD NUMBER WHEN OnDEHII«Q. ALL RETURNS MUST BE ACCOM- , 

PAN1EDBVAMAUTH0RIZATI0NNUMBER. 



/^■■ 




--lEpUnetheus 



[ ooPO>nAii[irj 



There is now an UNBELIEVABLY fast alternative to the 
Commodore 1 541 disk drive for loading programs! 

The ROMDISK with HYBERBOOT! 

ROMDISK is made up of 2 cartridges. The operating system 

(HYPERBOOT) plugs into the cartridge port; the actual 

ROMDISK plugs into the user RS232 port. 

ROMDISK'* toatures Includa: 



• YOU create YOUR crioice ot programs on tne flOMDISK with ftaay- 
: lo-LSO built-in menu-drivan programmer. 

• Load a 40K program in 3 SECONDS of an SK pnjgram in t/2 OF A 
SECOND. 

• The 128K byte ROMDISK oat% ba erased BIM rgprog rammed. 

• Up to 150 programs oan be stor^ on ROMDISK using menu-drtven 
software. 

• No oddilloftal powor supply Is needed. 

• Displays h custom powor-up message. 

• Basic programs auto-e«!cute, while rtieetilns language programs 
raqiiife the user to know the program execution address. 

• Works on C64 and l(w C128 in 64 mode. 

Available Thru This Ad Only: 

Send $1 79.00 (check or money order} to the address shown below 

or call (313) 26C}-^756 to place an order using your VISA or 

MasterCard. 

All epimolheus products corns with a 15-day money bacts 
guarantee, and a 90-day warranty against manutacturer defects. 

EPIMETHEUS CORPORATION 

P.O.Box 7281D8. Berkley. Mt 48071-8108 

{313} 280-2766 



FIFTEEN TIMES THE POWER! 



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Why qurchnse only l (horougfiljrfjd hancJicapping slriiie^y when you can fu^ve Iha 
POWEH of ihe 15 most popular handfcapping siraiegi&s available'' 



A new computer pfogram. clesigh&d by an M.B.A of Finance, combines innpiovecf varia- 
lions of lh& 15 most popular handicapping straiegies mio ono easy program Thts 
POWERFUL progrflm callod Multi-Slraiscnrtanalyiearac© USirtg l5slrflteQio$iii 8 Irac- 
lion ol [he time you analyze a racp using (ust 1 s(r,i!egy 



SimpI/ lype in tho answers (o ihe program aueglioh$ AH the inio is m tUfi Daily Racing 
Form The results oMhe 15 strategics wtti a utomaticaNy appiear on your screan or printer 
Mutii-StVats ihen tabulates the 15 strategy tolals to give you an ultimate number for each 
horse. 



When 1Q or more Slrale^les sete-Cl the same horse to win. that hor&e has Qvor a 90% 
en a nee ot wmnmg 



MuitiSi^ais pact^iigc includes * 1 5 strategies * 50 page booMei * 5V4' or 3"/?' Oi&k 
or Tape • Telephone hotline nymber * immediarefrrsTclnssdelivorv • QONUSffl video 

tuloriat (VHS or Beta) * QQNU5 it? Lottery Program ■* 3 y^mk money back 
GUARANTEE * All lor S12& 



Order Dy Money Order Ctieck, Vjsa. MC. AMEX, or COO to; 
Ban.ina Sort^are. Inc Dept SA 6531 Park Aver>ue. Keni. OH 



ORDERS (216) 673^6969 (24 hrs.J INQUIRIES (216^ 673-6167 (recording) 



ALL MODELS 
COMMODORE IBM APPLE RADIO SHACK ATARI COLECO 



^ commodore = 

AUTHORIZED REPAIR 

CALL FOR LOW PRICESI 



OVER 2000 



SOFTWARE TITLES 
IN STOCK 



^ commadars . 



SCHOOL P.O.'s ACCEPTED 



ra LIFETIME WAflRANTY 

&' TYVEK SLEEVES • LABELS 

WRITE PROTECTS • PACKAGED 

too up HI 99 

GENERIC SS/DD .40 .55 



NEW LOW PRICES 




..'s ^^'vWv-a - ill ^ 

CallUs 
Bofof^ You Buyl 
We Want Ynir Businesi 



K^SB 




349" 



^ 



wmGA 

AMIGA una PLUS AMIGA IWO' 

*850 

•C.P.U. IS REFURBISHED - FULL 90 DAY PARTS 

AND LABOR WARRANTY FHOIifl COtWMODORE. 

NEW AMIGA 1000. ALSO AVAILABLE 



MlcroComputar SarvlesB 
"S^^ SOO-433-77Se 

In IVIIchlgan [313] 427-0267 

IMFO S CUSTOMER SERVICE - (313} 427.0367 
HOUfiS; li^OI^ - SAT 10:00 A.IWt. - 8:D0 P M 
12864 Famiington, Livonia, Ml 48150 



Canon 

COLOR t/VK JET 

$24995 - 




SFD 1001 



FROM ^^'^QlW^ 




.1 ■ * "T 



Caff Us Last! 

^EW SUPER LOW PRICES ON STARI 



SEIKOSHA SP-1000VC 

1M000RE n 

164 



COtVlMOOORE READY 



y 



NEAR LETTER QUALITY 
FRICTION EfTRACTOH 
190 CPS • SHEET FEEDER 



R W'* 



CR-220 



$79 



__ COMMODORE HEADY 

S*S» FROM EPSON 

50 CPS • TRACTOn FEED 



We Bought 

'em All 

FAR BELOW 

DEALER COST 



RETAIL 
499,96 



REGULAR 

DEALER 

COST 

325.00 




• 100% C-64 Compatible 

• Built in Hi'Res Green Monitor 

• Heavy duty power supply and 
sturdy case 

• AM units completely refurbished 
with full 90 day warranty 

$199.95 

DEALER PniCING AVAILABLE 
AnENTIBN S(3<B0LS - BIG SPECIALS ON PETfCBM 



MCJVISA/C.O.D. 

Ptuis includa phons nymbsr. OeslEr Inqulrisi 

Invited. All prices discounted far c nth or check. 

Ddd 3% for MC/VISA. Shipping: Printers »10.D0, 

EducBior $20.00. Disks H 00 per 100. <VVest Coast 

- add $2.00 per order! Add S3.00 (or C.O.D. 

Reduced shippint) for large quantities. 

Prices and ivaiteblllty 9ub|ect to changa 

withoul notice. ALL MERCHANDISE CARRIES 

MANUFACTURERS WARRANTY 



A Printer For 
All Reasons 

Search For The Best 

High Quality Graphic Printer 

The Results Are In We ran many printers through 
our battery of tests and this one came out first in its 
class. Our SP-1000, built by Seiko is a 100 characters 
per second, {12 horizontal by 9 vertical matrix), full bi- 
directional, logic seeking, true descender printer. The 
character matrix in NLQ {Near Letter Quality) mode is 
a very dense 24 (horizontal) by 18 (vertical). 

Features That Won't Quit With the SP-1000 your 
computer can now print 40, 48, 68, 80, 96, or 136 
characters per line. You can print in scores of style 
variations. You not only have standard Pica. Elite, 
Condensed and Itahcs, but also true Superscripts and 
Subscripts. Use bold, or italics to make the words 
stand out. Or. if you wish to be even more emphatic, 
underline the words. You can combine many modes 
and styles to make the variation almost endless. 

Forms? YesI Your Letterhead? Of Course! 

The tractors are adjustable from 4 to 10 inches. You 
can also use single sheets, plain typing paper, your 
letterhead, short memo forms, labels, whatever you 
choose. Any size to 10" in width. It will even load your 
paper automatically. Multiple copies? Absolutely! Use 
forms up to 3 thick. Spread sheets with many 
columns? Just go to condensed mode printing and 
print a full 136 columns wide all on a standard 8'/;" 
wide page. Forget expensive wide-carriage printers 
and having to change to wide carriage, paper. 

An Extra Long Life {2,5 million character) ribbon 
cartridge is only Si 1 00 Order #2001 . You need 
absolutely nothing else to Start printing— just add 
paper (single sheet or fanfold tractor). 

No Risk Ofter We give 
you a 2-week satisfaction 
guarantee. If you are 
not completely 
satisfied for any 
reason we 
will promptly 
refund your 
purchase. 

The warranty has now been extended to 2 years and 
service centers are located nationwide for your 
convenience. 

The Bottom Line: 

Commodore C-64 & C-128, Order #2200, graphics 

interface & cable built in, S169.95 
IBM-PC and compatibles. Order #2100. $189.95 

plus 8' shielded cable #1103, $16.95 
Apple lie or Macintosh, Order #2300. $194,95 

with cable, specify computer 
Standard Parallel with 36 pin Centronics connector. 

Order S2400. $189.95 no cable 
Standard Serial with RS-232 {DB-25) Connector, 

Order tt2500. $189,95 no cable 

Be sure to specify the order # for the correct version 
printer designed tor your computer. 

Interfaces and cables tor other computers. 
Call 805/987-2454 for details. 

Shipping in cont US is SIO 00. UPS Blue is S22 00. 




ONLY $169.95! 



UNIVERSAL RS-232 

IMTCDCA f^C ""*^ Commodore 
lly I CnrMX^C user Port expansion. 



ONLY $39.95 



+ shipping. 



Now you can connect and communicate w(itti anyof Ihe popular HS-232 
peripherals using your Commodore User Port. You can even connect 
more than one and leave it permanently attached. This superb ex- 
pander opens a whole new world to your Commodore computer's 
capabilities. You can now connect to printers, modems and any other 
RS-232 devices. If you already have a device that connects to the 

— i ^ rn User Port, don't w^orry because the 

V Jp^^i^^^^ s;^ ~ port is duplicated on Ihe outside edge 

\ '• tt "" ^^ °^ 'fio Interface. Simply plug It in and 

■' MM.-~'-,^n I turn on the device you want to com- 
municate with. Comes complete with 
sample driver program listings. Com- 
patitile with all Commodore home 
computers with a user port. 1-year 
warranty. Order #5232. 

AprOSpand-64 ' Gives your Commodore 64 or 
128 full expandability! This superbly designed expan- 
sion module plugs into the expansion port & gives you 4 
switchable (singly or in any combination) expansion 
connectors — plus fuse protection— plus a reset buttoni 
Before you buy an expander, be sure that it has a fuse to 
protect your computer and that you can activate your 
cartridges in any combination altowed by the cartridges. 




^ 







Order ^5064 
NOW ONLY $29.95 + shipping 

111 n* la/ r 'EX TEND ER-64 "allows you to place your Aprospand-64 
f VC WWi (or any other cartridge expander) in a more convenient 
location. This device Is a 10" section of ribbon cable with male and 
female connectors that allows you to place your cartridges to the side 
of, rather than in back of, your computer. This puts your cartridges 
and switches within easy reach, 

ONLY $79.95 ^shipping 

Order #5065 

Commodore Interfaces and Cables 

Cardprint G-WIZ Printer Interface #1 108 $46.95 

Cardprint B/PS (without Graphics) *f1105 $35.95 

Amiga Printer Cable {6 ft) #3040-6MF $17.95 

Amiga Printer Cable (10 ftl #3040-10MF.,,,. $21.95 

Commodore 6 Pin Serial Cable (5 ft) #3006-5IVIIVI,..$ 6.95 
Commodore 6 Pin Serial Cable {8 ft) #3006-8IVIM,..$ 8.95 

AddShl(itilnoPo(llom:S3.00Cont.U.S. »0.0OCA^,P^.H(,AK,APO,UPSBIUf) 

ORDERING INFORMATION Caiilofma residents add 

6% tax All prices are cash prices — VISA and MC add 3% to 
total We ship Ihe next business day on rnoney orders, 
cashier s checks, and charge cards A 14-day clearing 
period IS required for checks Prices subject to change— 
CALL Dealef inquiries invited 

For information call 805/987-2454 
TO ORDER CALL TOLL FREE 

1 (800) 962-5800 - USA 

1 (800) 962-3800 ■ Calif 
Or send order to 



(8-8 PST) 



1071 -A Avenida Acaso, Camanllo. CA 93010 



DEFT. CG 




THE AMAZING 

VCICE MASTER 



ENfER 

JHBflUAL 

FROmiER 

OF 

MAN'JO-mCHINE 

COMMUNICATIONS 

Tfiere Is nothing else like 
It. Vote Master gives 
both speech output 
and voice recognition with this single horctwoie product! Youi voice 
contfDis programs, or home appliances, robots, and moie with spoken 
commands. Vertxil response bock gives status, verifies, Of requests your 
repiyl Speech output ond recognition pottems ore recorded in with your 
voice. Or use the voice of your friend, boss, teacher, rrtother, even the 
family pet I Programming 1$ simple with new comma nds added to tiASIC. 
A music bonus program lets you write orid compose musicol icotes 
simply by humming ttie turve. Unlimited applicatKjns for tun, edLx:atlon, 
ond commercial use. Design your own pfogroms tor profit. Speech and 
recognition quplity unsurpassed by even the most sophisticated 
moch i nes. On fy Covox provides this high- tec h n-iorvel ot o price less 1 hon 
most cixnrTKXi periprierals. 

TlTe CovDx Voice lAaster comes comf^ete with all hardware and software 
for onty S89.95 (Add M shipping ond trandllrig for VSA. S6 Conado, 310 
crrer seos. ) Ava ikJble for Com modore M/ 1 28, Apple II, 1 1 +, I Ic, I te. Atari SOO. 
800XL. 130 XE. Specify wtieh ordering. Visa. MosterCord phone rxders 
accepted. 

Call Of write lot FS£E Voles Mastm Inlopak 
and ipeclat combination package often. 

COVOX live, DEPT. CG 

676-D Conger Street • Eugerro, Oteoon ?7il02 • USA 
Area Code (503) 342-1 271 • Telex 706017 (Av-AlormUD) 




Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation 
a$ Required by 39 U.S.C. 3685 

1A. COMPU^rs GAZETTE 
IB. 699710 

2. 9-25-86 

3. Monthly 
3A, Twelve 
3B. $24.00 

4. 825 Seventh Areiie, New York. NY 10019 

5. Same 

6. Putilisher, James Casella, 825 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 1Q019 
Editor, Robert C. Lock 324 W. V\fendover to.. Suite 200, 
Greensboro, NC 27408 

Managing Editor, Kathleen MaJlinek, 324 W. Wfefidovec fve., Suite, 200, 
Greensboro, NC 27408 

7. ABC Consumer l\^3gazires, Inc, (Sole stockholder Capital Citiss/ 
American Broadcastng Cofnpanies, inc., 1330 Are. of the Atnericas, 
New York, NY 10019) 825 Seventh Ave,, New York, NY 100t9 

8. N/A 

9. N/A 

10, Extent and Nature of Circulation 



Afoage ix). of copits ext\ Ma) no. cofies ol 

issue Afing pfKxdrg sin^ issue pubteTiK] 

12 monttis neaitst to fine; ilatE 



A, Total no. Cooies {M Press Run) 

B, PMClCUtIt»i 

1. Sjtes Itirougti ctealers ind antta, 
street vdndois. and counter sales 
2 Mai subscnptions 

C, Total Pan Ctaiixn 

D, Free Distnbutron by mail, canier. 
Of olher mcias, samoles, comol>- 
mentary and ottw tree copies 

E, Total DEtntuum 

F, Copies EXit Distributed 

1. 0flic« ise. left crver, loacounited 
tor. spoded ^er pnrrtxiQ 

2. fiewns Irom news agents 

G, Total 



411,543 

iii,7es 

191,665 



294.917 



8,112 
108.514 
411,543 



404.504 

tosm 
mm 

277219 

1M« 

114.778 

4W,504 



I certify that the statements made by ms atxive are correct and complete. 
JatTies Casella, Publisher. 



^% 



4. 




KRACKER JAX® 
REVEALED! 

THE BOOK ^=— 



At last — Krteker Jax takes you 
beyond ttie protection barrierl The 
secrets of un-protocting softwaro are 
yours witti Kraokar Jut revealed! 

We'll stiow you exactly ttow to defeat 
live diflerent protection schemes 
encompassing scores ol currant 
programs. Our tutorial tias twenty 
specific examples to lead you, step 
by step, to a new level of knowledge. 
Here's what you gel: 

• xracksr Jsz rev a a led, 

• A reset switchi. 

• A utility disk, 

• 20 parameters an disk, 

ONLY $19.95 COMPLETE! 

Pi^ase add ^^.60 shipping A handhng, 
C.O,D. orders imusl add £t.50 mora. 
Please allow two weoks lor delivery. 



KBACKIiB JAX'' 

■ LJlIT 
DIIX 

TicrzBCTioir 



ARE YOU CAUGHT UP IN THE 
COPY PROTECTION ARMS RACE? 

DEFEND YOURSELF WITH KHACKEB JAX^ 
A REVOLUTION IN ARCHIVAL SOFTWARE! 



^\ 



You know the routing by now: yoj buy art 
oxpenslvo nlbbl^r and next montli U's 
obsolelQ, How many Umes Is your wallet 
OOing to Oe nibbl«d? 

XTAcktr J«x bs NOT a nibblar M Ja a param* 
flier copy system. Most volumes contain 
weN over 1Q0 separate copy parameters 
What 1S a parameter? Jusl a custom pro- 
gram thai allows your 1541 or 1571 disk 
drlva to strip all, and we rnean ALL, copy 
proiecHoo ffom yoor expensiva sotiware. 
leaving you wJth UNPROTECTED, TOTALLY 
BROKEN backups thai can be copied with 
even a simple fast copier. 

This sysiem has many advantages over the 
older nlbbler type oi utIIMIea. For one Wn^, 
you don't have to e)[perimerit. Each 
parameter WILL back-up the title li was cre- 
ated Tor, Period, 

For another, a back-up created with 
KTAckir JMx witi NEVER rattle your disk 
drive head. And that means less disk drive 
alignment pmblems for you. 



Check out some of ihese 
exclusive fealures: 
■ Kraelcir Jaz is Ihe BEST program ol Its 
kind! 

• Krmekar Jax will back up lltfas that Ihe 
nibblers CAN'T! 

• Kraekir Jak requires NO special 
knowledge to opsraie! 

• Eraeker Jam strips protection in a matter 
of SECONDS! 

- EratkBT Jtx Is priced RIGHT— Just 
S19,95 compteie! 

• Kraakflr Jax is UNPROTECTED— easy to 
back up I 

• Krtckir ^mx. updates are available 
QUARTERLYf 

Remember, the minule a new program is 
released, the Kraaktr Jax team will be 
developing a new parameter lor il. This 
means mat future Kraekvr lax dlsk^ will 
always contain parameters for the hottest 
new titles on the marketl Xrankir Jax le 
ihs system that cannot Ial9 behind the 
timesE 

In the copy protection arms race, XTielcer 
Jax is the ultimate delensel 



^ 



ALL NEW VOLUME FOUR 

ONLY $19.95 EACH! VOL 1-3 STILL AVAILABLE, 



^ 



ODMCITEF MART 



Program Submissions 
Watited 

Good Commissions, 
National Marketing. 



CHECKS, MONEY ORDERS OR VISWMASTEFICARD, 
Mail your order to: Connputer Marl, Dept, G 
2700 NE Andresen Road I Vancouver, WA 98661 
Phonn ordBTS walcome: 206-695-1005 
Same day sh[ppingfC,0.D,3 piease add S3.00. 




THE LOWEST 
PRICES 



THE BEST 
SERVICE 



PHONE 
LINES 
OPEN 



10-6 E.S.T. 
M-F 



ELECTRONIC ONE* 

CALL f6]4J 864-9994 • P.O. Box 13428 • COLUMBUS. OHIO 43213 



HARDWARE 

C12B COMPUTER 269 99 

MC COMPUTER 179 99 

1SJ1C DISK DRIVE 18999 

ISOZARGBMONITOfi Z79.99 

MPS 1200 PRINTER .Z'tg.as 

leOZCOLORMONtTOB 179.99 

PRIMERS 
STAR NX 10 239 99 

STAR GEMINI II . 235.99 

EPSON LXB6 (NEW) , Z29.99 

PANASONfC 1092 319.99 

PANASONIC KX3 131 269.99 

SEIKOSHASP1000VC ...179.99 

STAR SO 10 31999 

STAR SR 10 -159. 99 

STAR 1210 1B9.99 

MISC. HARDWARE 
TYMAC '-CONNECTION" 

INTERFACE 39.99 

XETEC JR. INTERFACE 39.99 
XETEC SR. (ak BUFF) 56.99 

MESSENGER MODEM 36.99 

COMM 300 BAUD MODEM 59.99 
COMM 1200 

BAUD MODEM . .149.99 

AVATE XMODEM . 76.99 

AVATEX (HAVESI 

MODEM 12<l.99 

MONITORS 
SCOTT 13TV.M0NITOR 2S999 
I902ARGB 

SAKATAI3" COLOR 14999 

SAMSUNG 14 - COLOR 149 99 



Cz. commodore 

^i SUPE 



COMMODORE 
UTILITY SOFTWARE 
PRINT SHOP 29.99 

PRINT SHOP 

COMPANION 24.99 

GRAPHIC LIB 14.99 

PRINT MASTER 28 99 

PARTNER 12B 48.99 

DATA MANAGER 128 46.99 

WORD WRITER 12B 46.99 

SVLVIA PORTER 46.99 

MCIROSOFT MULTIPLAN ..29.99 
BETTER WORKING 

SPREADSHEET 29 99 

FILE & REPORT 29.99 

PAPERCLIP 37.99 

PAPER C LI PW/S PELL 44.99 

PERFECT FILER 26.99 

EASV SCRIPT 29.99 

FAST LOAD , 26.99 

MACH5 24.99 

MACHISa 27.99 

SPELL WIZARD 19.99 

POCKET WRITER Z6.99 

POCKET PLANNER 128 26,99 

POCKET FILER 64 26.99 

JANE 36 99 

GEOS 39.99 

NEWSROOM 34.99 



DISKETTES - SALE - 10 PACK 



SONY S»S DfD 
SONY D/S DID 
MAXELL S(S DID 

MAXELL D(S O'D 
NASA DA D/S 0/D 
3M S/S D/D 
PRECISION D/S OID 
BONUS D/S D/D 
ELEPHANT S/S D/D 
ELEPHANT D/S D/D 



. 6.99 

-.8.99 

. .7.99 

. .9.99 

..7,99 

. 10.99 

7.99 

7.99 

799 

..8.99 



5Vi" 
5V<*' 
5V4" 
S'/t" 
5V<" 
5V," 

5y.'- 
sw 

5W' 



GENERICS/S D/fl 13,99 3fe" 

VERBATUM S/S D/D. . . , " 13.99 3'/i" 

MAXELL S/S D/D 15.99 3'/t" 

SONY D/S D/D 1999 3Vj" 

CENTECK(COLOR|S/S0/D 19,99 3Vi" 

03 



DISK CASE 5W OR 3W 7.99 



JOYSTICKS 

ATARI 6.99 

QUICKSH0T1 5.99 

QUICK SH0T2 7.99 

0UICKSH0T4 9.99 

GEM STICK 6.99 

UNITE 5 99 

EPYX500)U 13.99 

BOSS 1 1 99 

BAT 16 99 



RIBBONS 

NXfO 7.99 

SEIKOSHA B.99 

SGIO Z.99 

SGIO(COLOR) 3.99 

1525 7.99 

801 .7,99 

1526 7.99 

LXeO 7 99 

PANASONIC 7.99 

PROWRITER 6.99 



SOFTWARE 

KORONISRirr 14.99 

EIDOLON 14.99 

RESCUE FRAC 14.99 

COMBAT LEADER 12.99 

COMPUTER BASEBALL 12 99 

EAGLES 12 99 

FORTRESS 12,99 



SUPER CHRISTMAS 
SOFTWARE SALE 

ZORKl 6.99 

Z0RK2 6.99 

ZORK a 6.99 

KICKMAN 3.99 

ULYSSES 6.99 

DINOSAUR DIG 6.99 

DR.SEUIS 7,99 

FISHMETIC 4,99 

DUCKS AHOY 4.99 

ALF 3.99 

UP FOR GRABS 3.99 

SEAHORSE 6.99 

LOGIC LEVELS 4.99 

FISHER PRICE 

MUSIC 9.99 

ALPHABET rOO 3.99 

WEBSTER WORD GAME . . , .3,99 

JUKEBOX 3.99 

LEARNING W/LEEPER 4,99 

FRACTION FEVER 3.99 

PACEMAKER 3.99 

MR. ROBOT.. 3.99 

MATCHBOXES 3.99 

OIL WELLS 4.99 

THRESHOLD 4.99 

LUNAR LEEPER 4.99 

KID GRID 4.99 

DIG DUG 4.99 

CROSS FIRE ' 4,99 

SAMMV LIGHTFOOT 5.99 

COSMtCLIFE 3,99 

KIOSONKEYS 3,99 

MR. KOOL 3.99 



SUPER CHRISTMAS 
SOFTWARE SALE 

EASY FINANCE I 3.99 

EASY FINANCE III 399 

EASY FINANCE V 3.99 

SNAKE MAN 1.99 

INTRO BASIC 3.99 

RADAR RAT RACE 3 99 

BARBIE B99 

PILOT 3.99 

SPEED BINGO MATH 3 99 

ARGOS EXPEDITION B.99 

64 DOCTOR 8.99 

RAILROAD WORKS 8.99 

WEATHER TAMERS 8.99 

TUK GOES TO TOWN 699 

ERNIE MAGIC SHAPES .... 6.99 

MOVIE MUSICAL , .6.99 

BIG BIRD DELIVERY 6.99 

TYPE RIGHT 4.99 

CHOPPER MATH 408 

ARROWGRAPHICS 4.99 

JUPITER LJ^NDER 3.99 

JUNO FIRST 4.99 

BC QUEST FOR TIRES 6.99 

GVRUSS 499 

DECATHLON B.99 

POPEYE 8.99 

CRUSH CRUMBLE 4.99 

RECIPES 4 99 

SCREEN EDITOR 4 99 

GRID RUNNER 1 99 

ENGLISH 1-8 3.99sa. 

aBERT 6.99 

FROGGER 8.99 

TINKS ADVENTURE 6.99 

JAWBREAKERII 4.99 



ALL OUAUriES ARE LIMITED 



VtC-20 2.99 YOUR CHOICE 

- ALL aUANJIJIES ARE LIMITED - 
ALL ARE ON CART EXCEPT ULTIMA 



ULTIMA (CASS) 2.99 

SHARK TRAP 2.99 

JAWBREAKER 2,99 

CANNONSALL BLITZ 2,99 

THRESHOLD 2.99 

DEFENDER 2.99 

RICHOCHET 2.99 

MOON PATROL . . , , 

DIG DUG 2.99 

PACMAN a.fl9 

POLE POSITION 2.99 



DEMON ATTACK 2 99 

LUNAR LEEPER 2.99 

CREEPY CORRIDORS . . . 2.99 

CROSSFIRE 2.99 

K STAR PATROL .. , 2.99 

ROBOTRON 2.99 

JUNGLE HUNT Z.Bt 

MS PACMAN 2.99 

DONKEY KONG 2.99 

ATLANTIS Z.Sg 

DEADLY DUCK 2.99 



vroEo QAMES 

ATARI 2600 GAME SYSTEM 

ATARI 7600 GAME SYSTEM 

INTELLIVISION (REFURBISH) 

NINTENDO 

SEGA 

CALL FOR COMPLETE CATALOG 
FOR ALL GAME SYSTEMS 



..39.99 
-.79,99 
. . 19.99 
-119,99 
..69.99 



SOFTWARE 
WORLD GAMES 19.99 

GEM STONE WARRIOR . 12.99 

KUNGFU-FIST 14.99 

KUNG FU STICKS 14.99 

TRINITY, 19.99 

PERRY MASON 14.99 

ACE OF ACES 18.99 



SOFTWARE 
PI ND ALL CONSTRUCTION ,9 99 

ARCHON 9.99 

FOOTBALL fl.99 

HARDHATMAX 9 99 

SUPER BOULDER DASH 9.99 

ONE ON ONE 9.99 

HEART OP AFRICA .9.99 

7CITIESOFGOLD 9 99 



We can Bet 



most software 



for your 



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Cal[ or write. 



SOFTWARE 
MAILORDER MONSTER . ...9.89 

FUGHTSIMII 29.99 

JET 28.99 

INDIXR SPORTS 18.99 

HIGH ROLLERS 18.99 

MICRO LEAGE 
BASEBALL Z4,99 



HOW TO ORDERi CASHIER CHECK. MONEY ORDER, MASTERCARD- OR VISA" (ADD 4% FOR CHARGE CARDS) ... NO PERSONAL CHECKS ... NO C.O.O.'S . . , SHIPPED 

U.P.S ... ALL PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. 

SHIPPING: ADD S3.00 ON ALL ORDERS UNDER SIOO. 00 . . . ADDJ5 00ON ALL ORDERS OVER J100. 00. ACTUAL FREIGHT CHARGED ON MULTIPLE ORDERS 

tNTERNATIOHAL: ACTUAL FREIGHT CHARGED ON ALL ORDERS OUTSIDE THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES INCLUDING A P 

POLICIES: NO RETURNS WITHOUT A RETURN AUTHORIZATION ... NO RETURNS UNLESS DEFECTIVE. ALL DEFECTIVES WILL BE EXCHANGED . . NO EXCEPTIONS 

PLEASE SPECIFY . . , 

CALL OR WRITE FOR FREE CATALOG 



CALL ELECTRONIC ONE r6 1 4J 864-9994 



P.O. BOX 13428 COLUMBUS. OHIO 43213 



CASINO 
g> CRAPS 

A computir prDgnrn lor i)ie beginning or experienced ihooler. 

COMMODORE 64 or 128 DISK 
EASY TO USE: 

Completely smulaies vanaus casmos >iou;e rules a^O game viarignon'; 

Allows evf'v [)Ptt:ntj won -ivJiiaDie an a casino craps tatiif 

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As adverliseS in Gambling Timesl ^S^ -^•UZ 

It's Ihe same as the real Ifiing! ^^^ 

Orly $19.95 plus S3 OO sfiippirg and handling 

Credil cards, call l-BW-443-275) Exi 96 (USA) 

In Wyoming, l-B0O44?-2e54 FkI 96 ?4 Hour Service 

Check /Money Order to Casino Soltwsra 

505 Lewis, Rock Springs, WY 6290) 



IftTOl 








^5- ^ 




n^l^M 



The Handicapper 



Use your Commodore 64/128 to improve your per- 
formance at the track! Programs for Thoroughbred, 
Harness and Greyhound racing rank the horses or 
dogs in each race quickly and easily. All the information 
is readily available from the Racing Form, harness or 
dog track program. 

Thoroughbred factors include speed, distance, past 
performance, weight, class, jockey's record, beaten fa- 
vorite and post position. Harness factors include 
speed, post position, driver's record, breaking tenden- 
cies, class, parked-out signs and beaten favorite. Grey- 
hound factors include speed, past performance, ma- 
neuvering ability, favorite box, class, kennel record, 
beaten favorite and breaking ability. 

Complete instructions and wagering guide included. 
Thoroughbred, Harness or Greyhound Handicappers, 
$39.95 each on tape or disk. Any two for $59.95 or all 
three for $79.95. 



Federal Hill Software 
8134 Scotts Level Rd. 
Baltimore, MD 21208 




Toll Free Orders 800-628-2828 Ext. 
For Information 301-521-4886 



850 



GREAT PRODUCTS FOR YOUR COMMODORE 



promenade CI'" 
The Eprom Programmer, Thoughtfully designed, 
carefully constructed, thepromenade CI" is respected 
around the world for quality and value. The original 
software controlled programmer does away with 
personality modules and switches. Intelligent 
programming capability can cut programming time by 
95%' With Disk Software still just S99-50 



CAPTURE'- 

Take control of your '64 or '128* with this easy lo use 
cartridge. Lets you make a back-up disk of your 
memory-resident software. Your program is then fully 
accessible to you and your program can be re-booted 
from your disk 3-5 times faster. Or make an auto- 
starting cartridge using the promenade CI and a CPR 
cartridge kit. Its magic! 

,-.r,-rn,r,^.r ...-r.^r..., „ CAPTURE'" IS 3 bargain at 39.95 

CARTRIDGE MATERIALS: 

CPR-3 - Three socket board, case and 3 eproms, for use with CAPTURE" 29,95 

PCC2 - Two 2732 (4K) or 2764 (8K) eproms For '64 or '128 in 64 mode 4,95 

PCC4 - Four sockets for 2764. 27128 or 27256 {32K) eproms. Bank switching 17.95 

PGC8 - Like the PCC4 but twice the capacity. For multiple programs , 29.95 

PRB4 - Four sockets, eprom & battery backed RAM combination 24.95 

PTM2 - Basic 128 mode cartridge board. Two 2764 or 27128 eproms 5.95t 

PTM4 - Four sockets. 27128 & 27256 eproms, 128 mode bank switcher 19.95t 

PCCH2 - Plastic case (or above cartridges (except PCC8) 2.25 

Eproms - Always in stock at competitive prices. tavailable June "86. 

'when in 64 mode. 
EPROM ERASERS: 

Datarase - Hobbyist eprom eraser. 2 at a time. 3 to 10 minutes 34.95 

PE14 - Industrial quality eraser, 7 to 9 at a time 79.95 

Starter Set - CAPTURE", promenade CI and one CPR3 kit 149.95 

Deluxe Set - CAPTURE", promenade CI. Datarase and two CPR3 kits 199.95 

SHIPPING & HANDLING: USA - UPS SURFACE $3.00 FOREIGN (AIR MAIL ONLY) $13.00 

TO ORDER TOLL FREE 800-421-7731 

FROM CALIFORNIA 800-421-7748 

TECHNICAL SUPPORT 916-823-3284 

FROM OUTSIDE USA 916-823-3285 

MC, VISA, AMEX WELCOME 



E3 



JASON-RANHEIM 

1805 INDUSTRIAL DRIVE 
AUBURN, CA USA 95603 



13S COMPUTEI's Gaiette January 1987 



Software Discounters i^oca; 

l#l ^VIII"il^O •Free shipping on orders over 

For Orders Only— 1-800-225-7638 $100 in continental USA 

PA Orders— 1-800-223-7784 -No surcharge for VISA/MasterCard 

Customer Service 412-361-5291 •Your card is not charged until we ship 



ABACUS BOOKS 

C12Q Basic 7 (niemals 

C12Blnt(!rn9ls CALL 

CIZBPeeks&PDhesFOR 

CIMTrickj 4 Tips PRICES 

CPM 128Usors Guide 

1571 fntflrnala 

GEOS-lnsldo e, Oul 

ABACUS SOFTWARE 

Basic 128 

Cad Pak 64 or 128 

Chan Pak 128 

Cobol 64 or 128 

Power Pian64 CALL 

SoeedTBrm 128 FOR 

SupEi C 12B PRtCES 

Super Pascal 64 

ACCESS 

Exacullve Laador Board 

OaiiiDisk su 

Lsadsr Board Golf |D)S25 
Leader Board 

Tourn Diskdl ... .114 
TenthFramB(O) . . . .*2S 
ACTIVISION 

Cnristiti8sKll(D). . . .»1fl 
Cross Counlry Road 

Race ID) »n 

QarnQmaHer Library Disks 

Sporls t14 

SclFi 114 

Garry Kitchon's 

Gamemaker fD) . .325 

Hackef2|D) t23 

Labyrintri{D) S23 

Little Computer 

People (Dl 123 

Music SluOio (01 MJ 
Shanghai (0) .123 

Spac«Snul1ia(OI tM 
Tass Times (D) t23 

Transformers (Di (23 
ACCOLADE 
Aceo)Aces{D) , , .Hi 

FighlNiQhMD) t19 

Haraaall (D) 119 

PSI-5TradlnoCo.iD).t19 

AMERICAN 

EDUCATIONAL 

AN Tiller AvailaWa Call 

ARTWOnx 

Beach Blani^et 

VolloybalUD) 112 

BrldQe 4.0(D) t18 

Police Cadet ID) $12 

StripPok(jr(0) - -. .J21 

Ttiai Boxing (D) St2 

DalaDiskHi tamaia .St4 
DalaDisk*2maie . . .1)4 
Data Disk Il3lemale t14 
ARTWQRX PX 
HolelnOneGolMDl XT 
Pro Boxing (D| . .S7 

AVALON HILL 
Super Sun()a>'(0) SIS 
SBS 1984 Team Disk S14 
SBS 1 985 Toorn Disk »14 
SBS Cfiamps Disk . tu 

Spiltlre'40(D| 123 

Title Bout ID) 119 

TournamenI Golt (D) . J1S 
A VANTAGE 

Desert Fox (Dl . S12 

DeceploriDi J»I 

Spy vs Spft S2(0) t12 
BATTERIES INCLUDED 
Consultant (64 or 128)136 



Home Pak (0) t14 

Paperclip w/Spell 

[64 or 1281 M7 

Paperclip II 128 $49 

BERKELEY SOFTWORKS 

Gsos128 Call 

Geo364(D) S39 

'Geos Desk Pak (Ol .S23 

'Gao-Dox(D) »2S 

■Geos Font Pak(Dl. .t19 

• Wrilofs Works hop (O) J33 

* Geos aftd'On programs 
onlyl 
SnOOERBUND 

Bank SI Serios Clll 

Carmen Sandlego (□) S23 

Print Shop (D) $28 

PS Companion (0) .$23 
P.S. Graphics LIDrary 

r(1,K2,or»3 . . .$18E«. 
P.S. Graphics Library 
Holiday Edition .$16 

KaratekalD) $19 

ToySnop(O) ..$39 

Type' (D) ..$25 

CBS 

ArgosEipooittoniD) $7 
Big Bird S[JC Del (R) JT 
Dream House ID) 17 

Ernie's Big Splash (Df IS 
Ernie's Magic Shapes (R) $7 
Mastering the SAT (O), 144 
Math Mileage (O). . . .17 
Railroad works (0) ...17 
Rich Scarry's Eleclronic 
Word Book (D) . . .112 
Sesame St Pals 

Around To«n(Dl . . .19 
Success wiAigebra Call 
Success w/Malh. . . -Call 
Timebound(Oi. . $7 
Weather Tamers ID) 17 
CDA 

America Cooks Series: 
Americari(D). . . .$9.9S 
Chinese (0) ..$9.95 

French (□) $9.95 

Italian (0) . $9.95 
Mexican (Dl $9.95 

CMS 

General Acct 128 1119 
DATA EAST 

Commando (D) $23 

Kuno Fu Master (Dl. .$23 
Tag Team Wrostlln(j{D) $23 
OATASOFT 

Alt. Reality; City (Dl. 125 
Alt, Reality: 

Dungeon (D) $25 

Mercenary (Dl $19 

Never Ending Story (D} $19 
Theatre Europe (Dl . .123 
Video TidoShopiD) (19 
DAVIDSON 

Math Blaster ID) 133 
Spoil II (Dl $33 

Word Attack (D| $33 

DIGITAL SOLUTIONS 
Pocket Filer 128 
Pockol Planner 128 
Pocket Writer 128 
'Your choice . 129.95 Ea. 
ELECTRONIC ARTS 
Software Clatilc Series: 

ArchOh(D| $9.SS 

Cut & Paste W.P (01 ia«e 
Heart ol Africa (D) $9.88 



Mall Order 

MonsterslDI . 19.98 
MULE (D) J9.se 

Music Const. Sel (Dl . 19.88 
One-on.One |D) 19.88 
Pinbail Const. Set (DlW.8a 
Racing Dest. Set (0)19.88 
Seven Cities Gold(D| S9J8 
Super Boulder 

Da3h(D) $9.88 

Touchdown 

FDolball(Dl $9.88 

ELECTRONIC ARTS 
Adv Ccnal SeMDi $26 
Amnosln(O) $26 

Archon2: Adopt (Dl 123 
Arctic Fox (Dl $23 

Bard's Tale 1 (Dl . . $26 
Bard's Tale 2: The 

Destiny Kniotlt(D). $26 

BatllBl(ont(Dl $26 

Carriers atWar(D) ..$32 
Chessmaster 2QQ0 |D)$26 
Europe Abla;ze(Dl . . .$32 
Lords ol Cor^uest (Dj . S23 
Make Vour Own 

Murder Party ID) $23 
Marble Madness (D) $23 
Movie Maker (01 . .$23 
Robot Rascals ID) . . .$26 

SkyfoxlDI $23 

star Fleet 1(0) $26 

Timothy Loary's 

MindMirror(Ol ...$23 
Ultimate Wizard ID). $19 
ELECTRIC DREAMS 
Rocky Horror Show (D| $19 

Spindii/yfDl $19 

Zords{D) $19 

EPYK 

BaroielDf $9 

Champ vViostlir)g(Dl .$23 

De3troyer(0) $23 

Fast Load |R) $19.9S 

Impossible Mission (Dl .$9 
Movie Mon3tor(D|. . .$23 

Muitiplan 128 $33 

Pilstop 11(01 $9 

P.S Graiphics ScraptBok 1: 

Sports ID) $16 

P S Graohics Scrapbook 2 

Oil the Wait ID) . 116 
Summer Games 2 (Dl $23 
Super Cycle (D| . . . .$23 
Temple of Apshai 

TriloBy(D) $23 

Winter Games (Dl . . .$23 
World Championship 

Karate |D| $17.95 

World Games lO) ... .$23 
Ft HE BIRD 

EiitelDl $19 

The Pawn (D| $29 

FISHER PRICE 

Alpha Build (R) $7 

OancoFBnta5y(R). . $7 
Hop Along 

Counting (Rl $7 

Linking Logic {Rl $7 

Memory Manor (R) ...$7 
Number Tumbler |Ri . .$7 

Sea Speller (Rl $7 

QAMESTAR 
Championship 

Baset)all'86 $23 

Champ Basketball (D). $23 
Star Rank Boiing|D).$19 



HES 

Microsolt Muitiplan (0) $t9 

Millionaire (Dl $12 

Proiect Space 

StatiDn(D) $19 

HI-TECH EXPRESSIONS 

Card Ware (Dl $7 

Heart Ware (Dl $7 

Jingle Disk $7 

Party Ware (Dl $9.95 

Ware w/ail Supply 

Kit $12 

INFOCOM 

A Mind Forever 

Voy.iaing128 ....$25 

Ballyhoo(D| $25 

Enchanter |D) $23 

Hitciihiker'B Guide to 

theGalaiylDI . .123 

lnliriot(D| $25 

Leather Goddesses .$23 

Maonmist(D| $23 

PlanetfaillD) $23 

Sorcerer |D) $25 

Suspect ID) $25 

Trinity 128 $25 

Wishbfinger(Dl $23 

Zork 1 10) . M3 

Zork2or3(Dl 125 

INTRACORP 
inlracourse (Compallbttity 

& Analysis Moduiosl$65 
Inlracourse iCompatibifity 

Modulel $33 

Inlracourse (Analysis 

Modulel $39 

MASTERTnONIC 

Action Biker (0) 17 

EleclraGiide(D| IT 

infinity Machine (Rl $12 
SASido Soccer ID) 17 

Klkstartl2B 112 

Knight Games |D| ... .$7 

Last VB ID) $7 

Last V.a 128 $t2 

Master ol Magic (01. . .$7 

Mirage ID) $7 

Nin|a(Dl. $7 

ProGoll(DI 17 

Speed King (D) 17 

The Slugger (0) 17 

Vegas Poker & 

jackpot IDI $7 

MICROLEAQUE 

Baseball ID) 125 

Box Score Slats (D). .$16 

General Manager (D) . $25 

1985 Team Data Disk $14 

WWF Wrestling (01 . . $25 

MICROPflOSE 

F-15 Strike Eagle (D) .123 

Gunship(Ol 123 

Silent Sen ice ID) $23 
MINDSCAPE 
Bop t Wrestle (Dl . . $19 
Color Md The Computer 
Coloring Kit|D| . .$19 

FaiitlghMOl $19 

High Roller (0) $19 

Indoor Sporls (Dl. $19 

InllllralorlDl $19 

Perfect Score SAT (Oi$44 
Tlie Amerlcao Chailenge 

Sailing Simulation (C^ $19 
MISC 
CSM 1541 

Aiisjn Kll(D) . . $29 



Central Point. 

Capy2|D) $23 

Font Master II (01 . $33 

Galo(01 ... $19 

Sargan3(D| $25 

Snapshot 64 |R| $39 

Suporbase 64 (Dl ... .$47 
Superbase 128 (D). . .$59 
Superscript 64(0} . . .$33 
Superscript 128. .. . .$47 
ORIGIN 

Aulcduel(Di $32 

Moebius(DI $26 

OgreiD) $26 

Ultimo 3(D| $32 

Ultima 4 (01 $39 

PENQUIN(POLARWARE 
Crimson Crown ID) $12 

Oo-Topos(D| $12 

Transyiiranla(Dl ... .$12 

PROFESSIONAL 

SOFTWARE 

Fleet System 2—Vt.P. 

w/90,000 word spell 

checker84or 128 139 
Fleet System 3 11261 $49 
RELEVANT 

Bilinnard Maker (Dl. $25 
Icon Factory (D| $25 

SCARBOROUGH 
Boston Computer 

Diet ID) $23 

Build A Book (Dl . . ..$18 

Maslertype(Dl $25 

Net Worth (0) $39 

SIMON a SCHUSTER 

Chem Lab(Dl $25 

Great Infi Paper 

Airplane Const |Dj $19 
star Trek: Promethean 

Prophecy ID) $19 

Typing Tutor3(D| . . .$25 

SPINNAKER 

ACE: Air Combat 

Emulator |D| $14 

Homework Helper: 
Math Word Problems $23 

Writing $23 

KungFulor2(0) .119«a. 
SPRINGBOARD 
Certificate Maker ID) 133 

Newsroom |D) 133 

N.R Clip Art Vol. 1 (0)119 
N R CiipArt Vol. 2(D)$25 
N.R. Clip Art Vol. 310)119 
Print Shop Graphics 

Expander |0) $23 

SSI 

Baltic Group (Dl $37 

Battle otAntietamlO) $33 
Colonial Conquest (O) $25 
Gems lone He aler(D| $19 
Gettysburg (D) . .137 
KamptgruppolDl . $37 
Moch BrigadelDI . .$37 

NAM ID) $25 

PhanlasiolDl $25 

Phantaaie 2 (Dl $25 

Rings olZiitin(D| . ...$25 

Roadwar 2C0a |D| 125 

ShardolSpring|Dl...$25 

Warship(O) $39 

Wira/fls Crovnn (0) ... 125 
SUBLOOtC 

BaselullfO) $32 

Flight Simulator 2 (01. $32 
F.S. Scenery Disks . .Call 



Football ID) $28 

JeKDI $26 

TELARIUM 

Ama;Dn(Ol $9 

Fahrenheit 451 |D). $9 

Dragon Worid(Dl $9 

Rendezvous w^ma (O) $9 

TIMEWORKS 

Accts. Payable (D). . .$39 

Accts. Receivable (Dl $39 

Data Managers (D) . $25 

Data Manager 128 . . $43 

Evelyn Wood 

Dyn.vnicRoader|D1125 
General Ledger (D) ..$39 
inventory Mflmt ID) . .$39 

Partner 128 (HI $43 

SwiftcaicrSidewayslO) $25 
Swiftcalcl 

Sideways (1281 ...$43 
Sylvia Porter's Personal 

FinPlannertD)e4 ..$31 
Sylvia Porter's 

Personal Financial 

Planner 128 $43 

Word Writer wf 

Speller ID) $33 

Word Writer wr85000 

Word Speller (128). $43 
UNISON WORLD 

ArtGallury 1 |Dl $16 

ArtGallury2|Dl $16 

Print Master (D) $23 

WEEKLY READER 
Slickybear ABC's ID) $16 
Stickybear Math(D| .$18 
Slickyt>ear 

Numbers (D) $18 

StickyOoar 

Opposltes|D| . . $18 
Slick yboar Reading |D) $18 
Stickybear Shapes (Dl . 1»6 
Slickybear 

Spill igrabbcr ID) . .116 
Slickybear Typing (D| .116 

WINDHAM CLASSICS 

Alice in Wonderland (Dl$9 
Below the Root (D) . .,$9 
Swiss Family 

Robinson (01 $9 

Treasure island (01 . . .$9 

Wi/.irriol 0!(0) $9 

ACCESSORIES 

Bonus SS.OD .$S.99Bl 

Bonus OS, DD. .$8.99Bji 

Bulk Disks Cfwap 

CompuServe Starter Kit 

(a $25 usage Cfedltl . $19 
Disk Case (Holds 50). .$9 
Disk Drive Cleaner ...$9 

Oisk Notchei 17 

Oow Jones Membership 

KiKShrsl 114 

EpyxSOOXJ Joystick $14 

Kraft Joystick $12 

Master! ronic Magnum 

Joystick $12 

Muppet Learning Keys Call 
Seikosha SPtOObVC 1(M 

C PS ComrTKrdore d I rect . 

connect dot matrix 

printer $179 

WicoBat Handle $17 

Wico Black Max $9 

WicoBoss $12 

xotoc Interfaces . . .Celt 



P.O. BOX 111327— DEPT. CG — BLAWNOX, PA 15238 



'plana Read The Following Ordering Terms i Condlliona Carelullir Bolore placing Your Order: Orders with cashiers check or money order shipped unrnadialBly. Per 
sohai & Cornpnny checks, allow 3 weeks clearance. No C.O.D.'s. Shipping; Continental U.S. A. —Orders under $100 add $3: free shipping on ordera ovar $100. AK, HI, 
FPO, APO—idd 15 on all orders. Canada t Puarlo Rico— add $10 on all orders. Sorry, no other international orders acccpled! PA residents add 6% sales lax on' the 
tolil amount ol order Including shipping chirgas! Prices subject to change without notice REASONS FOR CALLING CUSTOMER SERVICE— 412-361-5291 (llStatus of 
order Of back order (21 It any merchandise purchased within 60 days Irom S.D. ol A. is defective, please call tar a relurn authorization number. Deleclive merchandise 
will be replaced with the same merchandise only, NO CREDITS' After 60 days please reler to the manufacturers warranty included with the merchandise* return direct- 
ly to the manulaclurer. Cuttomer »rvlc> will not accept cotlMI call* m ctfli on S.D. OF A.'i SOOt order llrwt! REGULAR HOURS: Mon..F(l.9AM'5:30PM, Stl 10AM-4PM 
Eattem Time, CHRISTMAS HOURS: Nov. 1Dec. 16: Mon. i FrI, gAM'5:3a PM, Tues,. W»d, h Thura, BAM.8PM, Sat. 10AM,4PM EaaiemTlma. Cuilomer Senrlee Cloietl 
Saturday 1 Ewnln^t, ORDERS RECEIVED AFTER DECEMBER 161h WILL NOT BE QUAHANTEEO FOR CHRISTMAS OELIVERYI 



C\h SOFTWARE 

X^ I 11 Box60361 Houston. TX 77205 1-713-288-9090 
Only $S.00a Disk — Public Domain & User Supported Programs 



GAMES - ADVENTURE 

Pirate Adv. Baseball G1 
Slamars - Star Trek G2 
Kentucky Dortjy G3 

Yahlzee-Bridgft-Tfain GA 
Fracliqn Game G5 

Monopoly &*-AqLia G6 
Draw Pokor G7 

Racetrak Pak-Jann GB 
Spelling Game G-9 

Rat Run M^e Gpme G10 
Dixie Song GH 

MaslerGuess G12 

□ambusiers G13 

Ballleship Gt4 

WhirlyBird Cflipsufy G15 
Bingo Keno Gie 

HorscFtacoPokfif G17 
Crazy a'5 Need Cards Gia 



Triad-Brick bustflf 
Chess Tor Two 
Word Machine 
Labyrinth 
Wizards Castle 
Aiianiis Treasure 
Atncan Adventure 



G1S 
G20 

G^1 

G22 
G?3 

G25 



TUTOBIALS 
6510 OP Codes Chip 
Spped Reading 
Poruo Machines Lang 
Spelling - Typing 
Book Sort - Speed 
Tulorial Lalin 
Spanish 
Bilingual Spell 

UTILITIES 

Superman - Sorter 
Disk File 
Check Disk 
Rename- Renumber 
Fast Format 
Fast Copy 
Auto Load Fa3( 
Fast Sort 
Card Indexing 
Block Modilier 



HOME-MISC. 



11 
12 
T3 
T4 
T5 
T6 
T7 

Ta 



HMl 
KM2 
HM3 
H^M 
HM5 



Kaleidoscope 
Flower Demo 
Reference Prog 
Crteck Book 
f^rsonaliiy Teal 
M athlime-Menio raor H M6 
DietExamination HM7 
ROM Enhancemonl HM8 
Disk View HM9 

Voyager- Probe HM10 



UTl 
UT2 
UT3 
UT4 
UT5 
UT6 
LIT7 
UT8 
LIT9 
UT10 



WIIKTER - LISTER 
Wedge - Instruction 
Prelty Primer 
File to Printer 
Dynam-Data 8 
Program Lisler 
Bio-P(otlQr Printer 
□ir-Sort-Llniock 
Word Processor 



PLl 
PL2 
PL3 

PL4 
PL 5 
PL6 
PL7 
PLa 



MATH: EDUCATION 



Textmaster - Children PL9 



PICTURES SCREEN 

Slide Sho»i PSl 

Dragon PS2 

Snoopy PS3 

Donald Duck PS4 

Hopalong Cassidy PS5 



Long Division 
ReMex Timer 
Solar Syslem 
(3est Education 



MA1 
MA2 
MM 
MM 



Equations - Primes MA5 



World Capitals 
Russian Imago Cal. 
Hammurabi 
Master Mind 



MA6 
MAS 
MA9 

MAtO 



MUSIC 
Piano: Program 
Piano: Monopoly 
Sourtd Effects 
Music Sprite 
Music Yesterday 
Music Master 
Juke Box 1 



Ml 

M2 
M3 

M4 
M5 

M6 
M7 



CIA SOFTWARE P.O. BOX 60361 HOUSTON, TX 77205 



Disk Numbers: 
Ship to: 



I am enlosing £ 



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ffl 



^ MAGIC MENU ^ 2> 



Combined on this plug-in cartridge are 5 great programs creating a user- 
friendly machine from your Commodore 64 (or C-128 in the C-64 mode). 

MENU PROGRAM: automatically reads all program files from disk, then sorts & 
displays the programs on screen for easy, one-touch loading & running, 

GREAT FOR KIDS— no confusing commands or instructions to learn. 

FAST LOADER PROGRAM: loads most programs up to 500% faster. 

DISK CATALOG PROGRAM: prints a sorted catalog from the menu program. 

LABEL MAKER PROGRAM: prints unique disk labels displaying program names. 

Note; Label Maker supports Star Micron ics SG-10 and Smith Corona D200 printers, other models may also work 



^ 



•JV 



DISK UTILITY PROGRAM: displays a disk utility menu for easy one-touch 
selection of various disk operations, such as DIRECTORY, SCRATCH, NEW 
RENAME, FORMAT, VALIDATE. INITIALIZE, DISK HEADER, DISK I.D , etc. 



* 



Send check or money order for $39.00 + $3,00 shipping & handling. (Fla. residents add $1.95 tax.) 
Computer Camp, Inc., 1 202 Sioux Street, )upiter, FL 33458, (305) 746-5223 

MAGIC MENU— Copyright 1966 by Thomas Saporito — Commodore 64. C-64, and C-128 are registered trademarks of Commodore Intl Ltd. 



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C-64 or C-128 Computer 


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1541 or 1571 Drive 


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95 75 


1702, 1802 or 1902 Monitor 


75 


105 85 


MPS-801, 802, 1525 or 1526 


59 


89 69 


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And as an extra benefit — our 
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A $69.95 value — includes alignment and modification to stay in 
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For fast, expert service . . . 
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(For your convenience, have your equipment serial number and credit number ready. 
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ICOMPUTERSI 



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CLOCK/CALENDAR 

Cartridge for your 
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Combines three most needed functions in a 
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• Battery- Backed Ctock/Calendar 

• Battery- Backed RAM 

• Application ROM Capability 
Feat u ret: 

• Crystal controlled Clock keeps trme In seconds, minutss. trours, 
day of Itie week, month and year with aula leap year. 

• 8K bytes of battery-backed RAM included. 

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• 30 day unconditional money-back guarantee. 

CCSZ Cartridge $49.95 

Sttipping & Handling: 

UPS Surface (USA Only) $3.(M 

Foreign (Air Mall Only} $13.00 

Master Card, Visa, and Amex Welcome 
To Order Toll Free 800-421-7731 

From California 600-421-7748 

Tech Support 916-623-3284 

Eri JASON-RANHEIM 
^J 1805 Industrial Drive 

3 Auburn, CA USA 95603 



Copies of articles from this 
publication are now available from 
the UMl Article Clearinghouse. 

For more information about the 

Clearinghouse, please fill out and mail back 
the coupon below. 

LJu^anngnouse 



Yes! I would like to know more iboul UMl Article Clearinghouse. 

I am interested in electronic ordering tlirougti the following systemis): 

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5*1 Wfillamette Strwel 

Eugene. OH 97401 

Tel. 503-683.1154 




Kl-i 



The FSD-1 Disk Drive is a versatile and efficient 
disk drive built for the Commodore series of per- 
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directly replaces the Commodore 1541 Disk 
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Special Features 



Runs all C-64 commercial software 
Ready to run right (rom ihe box 
Full 6 month warranty 



Heavy duty construction 

Vented meial chassis 

Built especially for C-6'1 users 



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Pow'r Pak is a replacement power supply (1.5 amp) 
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We can offer you some of the lowest prices in the country on the most popular punters, mon- 
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EDUCATORS! 

We liawe a cjialog ii/si foryauf It's chack 
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rlp^ipet) tor use In scftnols .from 
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Aod heme's ttie best part: our lew, low prices 
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Call 1-800-340-2779 now 
pnd request aur Educaticfi Catalog! 



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■I covvrjLiC'rHf i?8 •\ » ii.ii^Nn,iik 1,1 c;oinirn;dc..n Ei»i:irDn>f% I la Foreign Orders idJ S'l OO flcni/y irem-i ^hiy jE jctuj" cik[ 




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Ti 



K 



102 Abacus 61,83^5 

103 Abby's Drsraunt Software 13t 

104 Absorute Entertainment Inc. , . 44 

105 Accolade 26-27 

1 06 Acorn o( Indiana, Inc. ...,,♦,,,..,. h 123 

10T ActionSoft 11 

108 AcflonSoR 12-13 

109 ActionSoft 14-15 

110 Activrslon 23.47,49^7 

111 American Intemaiional Compiiter Products - - . . 127 

112 Aprotek 133 

113 Artificial Intelligence Researcfi Group 122 

114 Atari Corp 93 

115 The Avaiofi HUl Game Company , 40 

1 16 TtiG Avalon HUl Gama Company , 42 

117 Tlio Avalon Hill Garrre Company 46 

1 1B Banana Software , 132 

1 19 Basix 75 

Batteries frtcluded 21 .63 

120 Berkeley Softworks 36-37,38-39.41.43 

121 Blackstiip Computer Suppfy 122 

1 22 Bodylog, Inc. 8-9 

Cardir>al Software , 76 

123 Casino Software ......,,.,,,,,.,,. 136 

1 24 Central Point Software 66 

125 Ctiealstieet Products. Inc 130 

126 CIA Software 136 

12T C-More Products 31 

CO.Iil.B. Direct Marlfflting Corp 96 

128 Communications Etectronics Inc 129 

129 Compumed 123 

130 CompuServe 1 

131 Computability 123.124-125 

132 Computer Camp, Inc 139 

133 Computer Centers ol America 120 

134 Computer Mail Order 121 

135 Computer Mart 134 

136 Covo!(. Inc 134 

Crown Custom Covers 128 

137 CSI^ Software Inc 125 

13a CYBER Systems , 128 

139 Data East 69 

140 db Soltwafs 76 

141 Digital Solutions Inc BC 

142 Electronic Arts IFC 

143 Electronic Arts 59 

144 Eloctronic Ono 135 

145 Emerald Component International 140 

140 Epimetheus Cofporation 132 

147 EPYX 77 

140 EPYX 79 

FasTeo 138 

149 Federal HiPI Software 136 

1 50 Firet)jrd Licensees Inc. .71 

1 91 Free Spirit Soltwa/e, Inc 126 

152 GSR Software Co 122 

Halix Institute 62 

153 HesWare 81 

154 HesWafs 83 

155 In ConTrol Irio 142 

158 Infocom ,..,..,,,. 18-19 

1 S7 Jason Rar)nelm 1 36,140 

15aKelel( ,,,,, 67 

KSofI 92 

Lyco Computer 94-95 

159 l^icroComputer Sen/ices 132 

■teo NlicroProse Simuiatton Software 51 

161 Montgomery Grant 141 

162 N.P.S. Inc 142 

NRf Schools. McGraw-Hill 33,105 

163 OkWata 4 

164 Origin Systems ^ ..,.,, IBC 

169 Prociston Data products 122 

166 Protecto 86-87 

ler Pro-Tecfilronics 90-91 

166 Quorum Intemationai, Unltd 130 

169 S a R Marketing 128 

Scfinedler Systems 123 

Second Source Engineering 122 

170 Sigrial Computer Consultants 130 

171 Silicon Express 96 

172 Software Discounters of America 137 

173 SOTA Computing Systems Ltd .130 

1 74 Star Micronice 89 

1 75 Strategic Simulations, Inc 55 

1 76 subUSGIG Corporation 7 

1 77 subLOGIC Corporation 25 

1 78 subLOGIC Corporation 53 

1 79 SubLOGIC Corporation 65 

Tektonics Plus, Inc 142 

1 80 Tenex Computer Express 143 

1 81 Tnad Computers 129 

1 82 Tussey Computer Products 28-29 

183 Ultrabyte 83 

184Unitecti 128 

1 05 Virtusonhcs CorporatiOr> 2-3 

186 Wsnger Corp 43 

1BT Xetec. Inc , 142 



Classified 



SOFTWARE 



FREE SOFTWARE for C64, CI 28, IBM, ft CPM 
Send SASA lor Info (specify computer) to: 
PUBLIC DOMAIN USERS GROUP, 
PO Box 1442-A2, Orange Park, FL 32067 



CM FINEST PUBLIC DOMAIN PROGRAMS 
*On Disk* most $1.50 'On Disk* free list 
You pick the programs You want!!? SASE 
][.H Co., Dept G, Box 67021, Topeka, KS 66507 



FREE MEMBERSHIP IN SOFTWARE CLUB. 
Top British C64 programs. Catalog and 
reviews (no strings). ARROW EXPRESS, 
Box 205 G8, Rossland, BC VOC lYO 



$S WIN WITH THOROUGHBRED, HARNESS & 
GREYHOUND handicapping software: $29.95, 
enhanced: $49,95, Professional Football 
Handicapping System: $39.95. For most 
computers. Free info. Software Exchange, Box 
53B2 CG, W, Bloomfield, Ml 48033. Call: (BOO) 
527-9467 

ALMOST FREE SOFTWARE: Excellent PD 
software. 15 prog/$2S. Send SASE for 
FREE catalog. Box 37, Bath, NH 03740. 
Looking for new PD progs for IBM & Comm. 

FREE CATALOG. Lowest priced public domain 
software available for your C64 and CI 28. 
We pay shipping. Send to: M&M SOFTWARE, 
P.O. Box 3111, Tcrrc Haute, IN 47803 

FREE! AMAZING MODEM FUN!I 
CALL**FANTASY PLAZA**TODAY! 
1-81B-840-3066 (300 BAUD MODEM} 
YOU WILL BE VERY IMPRESSED! 

COLORFUL VIDEO TITLE MAKER AND STORE 
ADVERTISING SOFTWARE USES YOUR 
PRINT SHOP (TM) FONTS AND DESIGNS,,, 
$14.95 {C6J disk) MicroAds, 145 EAST 
NOKMAN DR., PALATINE, IL 60067 

YUPPIE INDEXl ESTIMATE COST-BENEFITS 

of objectives and success! Do a market 
analysis of yourself and competition. 
C64 Disk $29.95. Order from IV-ER, 
239 Irving St., Falls Church, VA 22046 

FASTFILE ce4/12e for Home/Business. 

Customers say, "It's the best I've seen! 
It's easy to Icam, easy to use, won't hurt 
my drive, allows backups, and is 100 to 
1000 limes FASTER than popular databases!" 
Try FASTFILE with report for 15 days. 
If vou'ro not satisfied we'll refund 
35% of purchase. Send $59.95 + $4 s/h 
(WA res. add 7.8% and foreign $4 US) to: 
IMS Inc., 5312 W. Tucannon, Kennewick, WA 
99336. VISA/MC, Check, MO (509) 783-3829 

II you'd like information on the latest version 
of your soflw.ire, please call or write; 
Batteries Includeci Customer Support, 30 Mural 
St„ Richmond Hill, Ontario, Canada L4B 1B5 
(416) 881-9816 



NEW +4 and C12B SOFTWARE 
Games, educational, finance statistics. 
Write for info. CARDINAL SOITWARE, 14840 
Build America Dr., Woodbridgc, VA 22191 

CANADA, mail order software, peripherals 
large selection, popular titles, low price. 
Free info and price list: CANSOFT, 
Box 3464, Dept. G, Courtcnay, BC V9N 5N5 

COMMODORE: TRY BEFORE YOU BUY. 
Best selling games, utilities, educational + 
classics and now releases. lOO's of titles. 
Visa/MC, Free brochure. RENT-A-DISC, !-redorick 
Bldg. «345, Hunt'n, WV 25701 (304) 529-3232 

ABB BULLETIN BOARD FOR THE 64 & 128 

300-1200 Baud, Punter/Xmodcm/ASCIl, 
AUTO MESSAGE FORWARD! NG-ARB NETWORK 
Vote, Matchmaker, Quiz, 27 SIGS 
Con't Story, SOURCE CODE & More! $64.95 
(BBS) 718-645-1979 * (Voice) 718-336-2343 
L&S Computers, PO Box 392, Bklyn, NY 11229 

CONNECT 4, A 3-D TIC-TAC-TOE GAME FREE 
when you ask for your free Commodore 
Software Catalog, Panther Software, 
5425-M Albemarle, Charlotte, NC 28212 

SUPER CI 28 ALL ML SOFTWARE 'DISK ONLY* 
SuperPro Football, 128 (graphics) Drawer 
& Firescape $6 ea. or all SIO. Roy Brewer, 
5122 Mclntyre Dr., Knoxville, TN 37914 

FAMILY/BUSINESS APPOINTMENT CALENDAR 

Multi-user, 2-level security, universal 
calendar, hard copy, much more. $15.95 
for C64 or C128, $19.95 both. Disk only, 
J. Speers, 1249 Philip, Niles, Ml 49120 

PORTFOLIO MANAGER, C64, C128. Menu 
driven! 20 slocks, divs, eamgs, cap gain/loss info, 
p/e, avg price, graphs, more!! Disk $29.95, Mind 
Benders, 10331 Oliver Ln. West Palm Beach, FL 
33411 

THE GLEANER, A C64 GENEAU3CY PROGRAM 
Grp sheets, ped charts, index, 25p manual, 
selective search. $19.95 + $2 p/h 
Kudzu Software, Box 993, Morrow, GA 30260 



HARDWARE 



■ BUILD AN RS232 INTERFACE FOR THE €64 * 

CI 28 and the Vic 20 for about S.'J.OO. 
Supports pins 1-8,20,22. Plugs into user 
port. Send $4.00 for schematics to: 
Mat Karter, PO Box 7826, Nashua, NH 03060 

COMPUTER REPAIR ■ C64: $45, 1541: S50 
Parts available. MAJOR COMPUTER SERVICES, 
Rte. 6, Box 806-M, Midland, TX 79703 
(915) 561-8483 V/MC/COD 



MISCELLANEOUS 



SAVE MONHY ON SPEED OR AIJGNMHNT 
adjusting on C1541 with VIDEO instruction! 
VHS: $79,93 ea. to \l REESE, lllS^h D*ina St. 
#A, Anaheim, CA 92802 (714) 750-1850 



COMPUTErs Gazette Classified is a fow-cost way to tell over 275,000 
microcomputer owners about your product or service. 

Rstei: 125 per Imp, minimum u/ fuur lint^. Any ur all s>f thu flr^t lirn? Stft in cjpitai loucrs je nn charge. Add $15 

per linv int bold^nv words, or $S[] for ihc entire id set in boldface (any number i>f lint**-! Inquiri^ about diiipliy 

rJU">. 
TsriUBJ [*rifi4ivFrn-'iu is reu^ilrej, Chttk, money order, AmericarL l-xprfss. Visa, or MaNterC-ird is acccpied. Make 

fhfcks \\\Y^bW lo COMPUTin rublirfliions. 
Form: Ads ^re subject to pubiiiher's jpprovci] and must be either typtnJ or K^ftihly printed. One line equals AO 

ivSU'rs and spaces betvvi^en wordir Pjeasc underline words to be set in boldface. 
Qencfai Information: Advertisers using pt>st office box numbers in Iheir ads must stippiy permanent aiddress and 

telephone numbers. Orders will not be acknowledged. Ad will appear in nejtt avaiJabM? issue a^ter receipt. 
Closing: 10th of the third monfh pn?ceding cover date {Prg-, June issue closet March 10th). Send order and 

remittance toi Harry Blair, Classified Manaeer, COMPUTEI's Gazette, P.O. Box 540*, Greenshorfl, NC 27403. To 

place an ad bv-phone, call Marry Bbir at {919) 275-9S09, 
Notico: COMPUTtf Publications cannot be responsible for offers or clftims of sdvtrtJftfT?, but will attempt to screen 

out misleading or questlor.able copy. 









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Ori^ Systems, 

creators of the awardwirining Ultima® series, presents: 




Available on Apple* 




Total war against a juggernaut fighting machine 
I 1 by Steve Meuse 



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4 



A strategyr game for one or two players, 
OGRE pits an array of infantry and armored 
forces against a single cybernetic supertank, 
bristling with weapons— the OGRE. 

Adapted from the classic Steve Jackson 
board game. 
Computer 
OGRE 
epitomizes 
simplicity and 
play balance. If 
Players can [' 
use standard I 






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game maps 

or design 

their own. unrw ih« range opiton, 

Qp np cofukten ibi move and Bit 

the challenge of a lifetime is waiting 



.:»■ ■« i -! j^ ■» >^f. 



Utirw the RANGE option, a heavy Unk 
cofukten ibi move and fire rang«. 



/svsrens /uc. / 340 HARVEY ROAD, MANCHESTER, NH 03103 (603) 644-3360 






ULTIMA'- IV Is the long- 
awaited sequet to Ullima'" 
HI. The Quest of the Avatar 
is a quest to the final 
frontier— the self. 



ULTIMA- HI sends jfou on ULTIMA '- IV is the long- MOEBIUS '" lakes you 

an incredible fantasy role- awaited sequet to Ullima'" (hrough the elemenlal 

playing journey through HI. The Quest of the Avatar planes of a colorful Orien. 

monster-plagued Sosaria in is a quest to the final tal world of fantasy and 

search of the elusive frontier-the self. adventure in search of the 

^o^'is. Orb of Celestial Harmony/ 

OGRE andAulndtiet are registered tradeinariu of Sieve Jaduon Games, Incorrnraled. UUma / 

l> a r^lslered trademajit of Richard Gamatt. MoeblustsairademarkofGi^ Malontv . / 




AUTODUELTM is a hiturisMc 
fast-paced strategy role- 
playlng game where the 
right of way goes to the 
biggest guns. 



Autltort wanted. CoU in todays 




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iMmmm 




GotB 



iT^f^TTfrri JTTfni^'i mi 'tt-x- 



n do! We made our award 
and 64 comptilers even beHer! ' 



Introducing. . . Podc af Writar 2/wordfra- 
cessor Pockel P|tain«r 2/sprcrodshe«) ^ckal 

nier 2/datobase /.^jy^^^.-y - 

Our new Pocket 2 series offei^HJ|iHKsuaily found 
only in much more sophisMc<3f^|HKtions software. 
Features that indude: compotdbtft^with the new 
GEOS operating system t, abittty to work witti tlie 
Commodore RAM expander to allow o RAM disk, 
mouse support with Pull dowr menus, 1571 burst 
mode (or foster (itufflHBlncreased support for two 
single disk drives, ^ifflBKc configuration for screen 
color, format ood prim^selectiont- 

Sophistfcoled software, yes, and still easy to use. 
You can be up and running in under 30 minutes even 
If you hoven't operoted a computer before. 

Now, when you upgrode your Commodore'" 64 
to o 120, Pocket software helps moke it o breeze. The 
new Pocket 2 soltwore has both 128 ond,64 applica- 
tions on the some disk. So when you buy one you ore 
actually buying two software pockoges. The cost 
only S59.95 (U.S.). 



Serious Software 
Thafs Simple to Use 



You can buy all three Pocket 2 applicotions, % 
Pocket Writer 2, Pocket Planner 2 and (*^rt FilBi . 
In one convenient Superpak for the low^Mi» of 
only $99.95 (U.S.). Asuper woytodiscovl^^ll the 
integrated features of Pocket 2 software on<J.saye 
almost eighty dollars. , v^- .vy 

As a companion to Pocket Writer 2, a DIctionoi 
Disk containing 32,000 words (expondable to 40,0l 
Is available. The cost $ 14.95 (U.S.). 

For those of you who hove ol ready discovered the 
many benefits of owning Pocket software; we offer oil 
registered owners upgrade Pocket 2 software for only 
S19.95 (U.S.) plus 3.00 (U.S.) shipping and hondling! 
Available only by writing to Digital Solutions Inc. 

'Commodore'sMicro^ompuler^MagqiJrTe.independentre^^iewers, 
raled the original Pocltel Wrifei 128/64 and Potkel Plonner 128/64 
loftworelhe "Annuol Belief I986"inlheprodiKlivilytQtegorY. 

lnr«rnot>Onol DJJtrjbu^or f nqu'rjtl fo. 

V///J Digital 

Solutions 

2,30 Werthenn Court "A 

Richmond Hiil, Ontoiio 
Canodo UB 169 
Tst«ptione(4l6|731-B7/S 
Iol«s 06- 564501 

Fi>. :4761731.a'>l5 



SUp^lUUKS 

SolwHsnTtidt 



rriiijftiii 



wortfi of wftwore for ofily 



1-Bn0-?4S73I6 



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